DM Problems! Help!

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OK, at my High School we have a D&D club. Me and some of my friends joined last fall and everything went well. Some of us had played a little 3.5 but we were all new to 4e. We had a great DM for the first couple months but he had to stop for a while because of familly issues and eventually came back later as a player. After he left we took turns DMing for the second half of school. Me and my pal really enjoyed it and decided we would be interested in doing a campaign during the summer months. 

So fast forward to the end of school and I discover my fried will be going to California for a few weeks. I managed to get a few people from the club together, set up a time and date, and dropped about $35 bucks on supplies (not much, but for a 14yr old with no job it is). Instead of taking turns DMing during the summer i got together a campaign and DMed while my buddies played. It went well until i finished up the first "main" adventure of my campaign. I had begun setting up the next bit but I wasn't ready yet, so I called up my friend who had just gotten back from California. I explained that I needed some time and that if he wanted to he could take over as DM for now. 

I don't want to sound blunt because he's a really good friend but I really hate his campaign. He's a really big fan of Final Fantasy which is fine, but he's drawn alot from it (character names, music, theme, etc.) . Now that i could live with but I just hate the way that things have been going.


Example:

DM: You enter a round room with recently killed bodies,  there are cobwebs hanging from the ceiling and you can see several urns arount the room.

 Lvl 6 Elf Rouge (me): I'm gonna roll perception and search through some of the urns. ( I roll 23 on my perception check)

DM: (rolls the percentile die) High or low?

Elf Rouge: What? I rolled 23.... fine High

DM: You find 50 gold and a piece of cloth.


Example:

DM: You see an abandoned building on the outskirts of town.

Elf Rouge: I'm going to try and pick the lock. (I roll 28 on my thievery check)

DM: (rolls the percentile die) High or low?

Elf Rouge: What? I'm just trying to pick the lock.. did or didn't I?

DM: No

Lvl 7 Dragonborn Blackguard: That's ok, I'll just kick down the door. (rolls 12 on a STR check)

DM: You kick down the door, inside is the captain of the watch, he points his gun at you and a cannon swerves at you.

Elf Rouge: Whoa! A cannon? Really? I'm gonna try and kick up dust and hide behind the door frame! (15 on a bluff check and 27 stealth check)

DM: You can't hide, it's part of my story.


Example:

DM: The guard takes you to the pope to explain the current situation to you.

Pope: We have a thief in our town, I need your help catching him.

DM: You now have the option to answer along the lines of "OK".

Elf Rouge: I don't think I really want to help.

DM: You have to, it's part of the story.


Example:

Elf Rouge: I want to get this dagger appraised. 

Blacksmith: I don't know anything about that, I'm sure you could learn more in the Capital

Elf Rouge: Ok, I'm going to talk to the stable master and go to the capital, -instert name of dragonborn blackguard here- do you want to come with?

Dragonborn Blackguard: Sure, not much is going on here.

DM: You can't go to the capital yet, you have to finish the part of the story here first.

We had to cut our session short today because he didn't have enough of it planned out even though he told me the whole thing was done and ready to play. Then he drops the bomb that "Oh yeah, I was talking with -enter name of senior member of the club who is NOT the leader of the club here- and I'll be DMing at the club this year. My campaign will probably take all of the year so I doubt you'll be able to get yours in."  -_- He tells me this after I spend two and a half months of my summer vacation writing up a back ground story, and filling up a note book with several side quests and a main quest!! 

Yell FUUUUUUUUUU

When I DMed people really seemed to like the way it went. I tried talking to him outside of our sessions, explaining that checks are there for a reason, that I don't think anybody expected a gun and cannon when they joined a sword and sorcery campaign, and that I think that people would like the campaign better if it wasn't so linear, etc. He shrugs it all off and I just want to help!

If anybody has any ideas on what I can do then please, all help is welcome!

PS: Sorry for the long post.
Okay, the first thing I'm gonna say is that you have basically two options here:

1. Talk to the DM

2. Start your own game - maybe with some of the players from this game if they're up for it

First off, I don't know what this "high or low" and percentile die business is, I just know that's not something I've ever seen in 4e.  If it's a houserule, he should have leveled with you about it before you started playing.

Secondly, it sounds like you're dealing with a guy who is a control freak in and out of the game.  In-game, he's railroading you guys badly, and out of game he's trying to muscle his way into the DM seat and muscle you out (who died and made him boss anyways?).  There is no solution to that other than talk to him, and if he continues being a control freak, don't game with jerks.

The bit about trying to appraise the dagger shows a couple of things.  First off, it's generally a good idea to skip over town scenes.  They're often boring, if only because I can go shopping in real life, so why would I want to play a game where I can be an epic dragon-fighting badass and go shopping?  Secondly, he's railroading you guys pretty transparently.
DM advice: 1. Do a Session Zero. 2. Start With Action. 3. Always say "Yes" to player ideas. 4. Don't build railroads. 5. Make success, failure, and middling rolls interesting. Player advice: 1. Don't be a dick. 2. Build off each other, don't block each other. 3. You're supposed to be a badass. Act like it. Take risks. My poorly updated blog: http://engineeredfun.wordpress.com/
I'd also add, you guys should really look into collaborative world-building.  If it's just the DM creating a world all by himself, not only is that a lot of work which could trigger DM burnout, but they also might come up with something that not everyone likes - for example, this DM pulling out Final Fantasy and cannons when you and some of the other people around the table weren't crazy about.  If you get the whole table in on the world-building process, it's less work on the DM's shoulders, and you're more likely to come up with something that everyone likes.

Finally, I'd be a little concerned about how you said you've already prepared the main quest and a bunch of side quests and created the world.  Generally, it's not a good idea to prepare the plot in advance.  First, if you already know how things are going to turn out, what's the point of playing?  Secondly, sometime over the year, no matter how many contingencies you plan for, your players will do something you haven't anticipated and take you flying off that plot you prepared in advance.  That can easily cause a lot of frustration, as now all that stuff you worked on might go to waste, or you're going to be spending your time trying to manage your party to cajole or force them back onto the invisible railroad you built over the past two months.
DM advice: 1. Do a Session Zero. 2. Start With Action. 3. Always say "Yes" to player ideas. 4. Don't build railroads. 5. Make success, failure, and middling rolls interesting. Player advice: 1. Don't be a dick. 2. Build off each other, don't block each other. 3. You're supposed to be a badass. Act like it. Take risks. My poorly updated blog: http://engineeredfun.wordpress.com/
I'd also add, you guys should really look into collaborative world-building.  If it's just the DM creating a world all by himself, not only is that a lot of work which could trigger DM burnout, but they also might come up with something that not everyone likes - for example, this DM pulling out Final Fantasy and cannons when you and some of the other people around the table weren't crazy about.  If you get the whole table in on the world-building process, it's less work on the DM's shoulders, and you're more likely to come up with something that everyone likes.

Finally, I'd be a little concerned about how you said you've already prepared the main quest and a bunch of side quests and created the world.  Generally, it's not a good idea to prepare the plot in advance.  First, if you already know how things are going to turn out, what's the point of playing?  Secondly, sometime over the year, no matter how many contingencies you plan for, your players will do something you haven't anticipated and take you flying off that plot you prepared in advance.  That can easily cause a lot of frustration, as now all that stuff you worked on might go to waste, or you're going to be spending your time trying to manage your party to cajole or force them back onto the invisible railroad you built over the past two months.

Thanks for the advice about the world building, we had kind of already done something similar but it sounds like we can expand upon what we have. With the high-low thingy.. well basically the DM asks the player "high or low" and rolls a percentile die, it's basically like flipping a coin and calling heads or tails. I'm not a big fan of it but it can be used to have players come across "random" items in a barrel, I think one of the DMs in our club started it but I really don't know for sure.

Also, I guess I misspoke when I said "plot". I have a basic idea for a plot but it's nothing TOO big, what I meant is an adventure that I've been working on for a while: pc's hired to find magic artifact and missing daughter, troglodytes capture missing daughter and steal magic artifact, missing daughter is about to be sacrificed to a blue dragon the troglodytes have mistaken for a god, artifact turns out to be something that will make the dragon uber-powerful! A little cliche but I've had fun making it and the players seem interested.

Anyways, would you have any advice for setting up a long term campaign or know of anything that would help? If so it probably belongs on another thread but plz let me know if you have anything!
Anyways, would you have any advice for setting up a long term campaign or know of anything that would help? If so it probably belongs on another thread but plz let me know if you have anything!



Personally, I've kind of gotten away from long-term campaigns in favour of "mini-campaigs" of about 1-6 sessions or so, with a fairly clearly defined end point (which may end in a "to be continued").  I just find it works better for scheduling as it can be difficult to schedule around busy people's lives, and it's much more satisfying to wrap up a short campaign on a high note than to have ambitions to do a level 1-30 campaign spanning two years and stop playing by the time you hit level 5 when people run out of steam or it starts getting too hard to schedule.
DM advice: 1. Do a Session Zero. 2. Start With Action. 3. Always say "Yes" to player ideas. 4. Don't build railroads. 5. Make success, failure, and middling rolls interesting. Player advice: 1. Don't be a dick. 2. Build off each other, don't block each other. 3. You're supposed to be a badass. Act like it. Take risks. My poorly updated blog: http://engineeredfun.wordpress.com/

If a DM says "High or low" after I give them the results of a check thats strike 1,2 and possibly 3 for me. It drives me up a wall.


Explain your problems with the game to the DM and tell him that its really fun to hang out, but if he can't do something about those you aren't going to make any of the games anymore. Just because you are friends who both play dnd doesn't mean you have to play together.


Also run your own game, invite the people at the club you like, and run it somewhere else. Even invite your friend, and set it on a different day. 

"In a way, you are worse than Krusk"                               " As usual, Krusk comments with assuredness, but lacks the clarity and awareness of what he's talking about"

"Can't say enough how much I agree with Krusk"        "Wow, thank you very much"

"Your advice is the worst"                                                  "I'd recommend no one listed to Krusk's opinions about what games to play"

The percentile dice thing is sort of reminiscent of a system a group I'm in established a long time ago: when a player raises a question that the GM has not thought about and/or planned, the player and GM roll RoShamBo dice (the GM bought the group d3s with R, P, S, on them for Christmas several years ago for this purpose).  The running joke with that GM was don't raise any unnecessary questions because the answer could go against us.

When I run, I have co-opted the RoShamBo thing, but it is basically to determine something I honestly do not care about: regardless of the result I err for the players. Using the urns in the OP: if I win the RoShamBo, there's a small amount of treasure to be found; if the player wins there is something very valuable hidden in the urns.  The player(s) gets something regardless.

The rest is railroading at its worst.  That being said, if there is buy-in, railroading is OK.  In a game I am playing in, the DM prepares specific events for each session and if the players are thinking of deviating, the DM (sometimes not so) subtly explains that is not a direction he wants us to go.  Again, the running gag is when we think about diverging from the DM's plans and he says so, someone in the group states something to the effect of, "well the DM does not want us to go that way so lets go with what he's planned."  The group has bought into the railroading.  Obviously, Dotto88 (and his group) have not bought in and therefore there is a problem.  As others have said, speak to the DM.

 

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/19.jpg)

Are you really "entitled to your opinion"?
RedSiegfried wrote:
The cool thing is, you don't even NEED a reason to say yes.  Just stop looking for a reason to say no.
Dude, your friend sounds like a chump.
Sail a new boat and see who jumps on.

We had to cut our session short today because he didn't have enough of it planned out even though he told me the whole thing was done and ready to play. Then he drops the bomb that "Oh yeah, I was talking with -enter name of senior member of the club who is NOT the leader of the club here- and I'll be DMing at the club this year. My campaign will probably take all of the year so I doubt you'll be able to get yours in."  -_- He tells me this after I spend two and a half months of my summer vacation writing up a back ground story, and filling up a note book with several side quests and a main quest!! 

 FUUUUUUUUUU




Honestly, this sounds about perfect.
He has given you sufficient notice that he'll be doing his own thing and he won't be in your game. Which also means he won't dm in your game.
Let him DM in the club...
Take your summer players and carry on with the same (or new) game/story. If they enjoyed your game more than his,  than it shouldn't be an issue for any of them.
FWIW [4e designer] baseline assumption was that roughly 70% of your feats would be put towards combat effectiveness, parties would coordinate, and strikers would do 20/40/60 at-will damage+novas. If your party isn't doing that... well, you are below baseline, so yes, you need to optimize slightly to meet baseline. -Alcestis
Thank you everybody, I didn't expect to get this much help. It seems like unless I can figure something out with him I'll just "Sail a new boat and see who jumps on."
Thank you everybody, I didn't expect to get this much help. It seems like unless I can figure something out with him I'll just "Sail a new boat and see who jumps on."



I would also suggest that if you are writing a lot of material and its taking a sufficient amount of time to prepare that you aren't 'ready yet' then you are writing too much and wasting your time. 

Try running your game more improvisationally and worry less about having it ready ahead of time.  Its more fun and a lot more freeing.  Remember that ultimately the players are unlikely to care at all about anything you write before the start of the game....they care about their story, the story of their characters.  They care about what they want to do, and about accomplishing their own goals....and very little about the background of NPC's in the world. 

So show up ready to make the game about them.  They are the stars of the show.  If you are preparing that much material ahead of time, you are likely focusing on the wrong things. 

I hope this helps...and yes, launch your own game.  Drop that guy.
...and in the ancient voice of a million squirrels the begotten chittered "You have set upon yourselves a great and noble task, dare you step further, what say you! What say you!"
About the whole preparation thing I want to raise a small voice in its favour. I kinda like when there is at least somewhat of a plan in place. Yes the players can, will and should do imaginative stuff but having a decent story and maybe a cool dungeon or three ready is how Im used to play with my GMs... and when I GM its always ready adventures from a book or magazine. Bottom line. Play it like you and your friends like it.
About the whole preparation thing I want to raise a small voice in its favour. I kinda like when there is at least somewhat of a plan in place. Yes the players can, will and should do imaginative stuff but having a decent story and maybe a cool dungeon or three ready is how Im used to play with my GMs... and when I GM its always ready adventures from a book or magazine. Bottom line. Play it like you and your friends like it.



I'm not saying no prep at all, but from the sound of it hes overworking himself.
...and in the ancient voice of a million squirrels the begotten chittered "You have set upon yourselves a great and noble task, dare you step further, what say you! What say you!"
 Lvl 6 Elf Rouge (me): I'm gonna roll perception and search through some of the urns. ( I roll 23 on my perception check)

DM: (rolls the percentile die) High or low?

Elf Rouge: What? I rolled 23.... fine High


Elf Rouge: I'm going to try and pick the lock. (I roll 28 on my thievery check)

DM: (rolls the percentile die) High or low?

Elf Rouge: What? I'm just trying to pick the lock.. did or didn't I?

DM: No


This, I just don't get.  What does this mean anyway?  What IS it that he's doing here... or do you not know either?  

DM: You can't hide, it's part of my story.


DM: You have to, it's part of the story.


DM: You can't go to the capital yet, you have to finish the part of the story here first.


This is the obvious problem part.  I would explain to him (attempting to be diplomatic as I do so) that I'm not playing the game to play out an unchangeable story that he's already written.  I'm here to play my character's adventures, not his NPC's adventures.  I'm the one who makes the decisions on what my PC does and why - NOT HIM.  My characters actions and the details of the unfolding adventure will not be pre-destined by him but determined by my characters reactions to the situations he presents.  Really, if he said anything along those lines just one more time after that I'd politely collect my stuff and go home.  One thing I will not abide is having the DM tell me what my character can't do just because he's planned it differently.

Old School: It ain't what you play - it's how you play it.

My 1E Project: http://home.earthlink.net/~duanevp/dnd/Building%20D&D/buildingdnd.htm

"Who says I can't?" "The man in the funny hat..."

 Lvl 6 Elf Rouge (me): I'm gonna roll perception and search through some of the urns. ( I roll 23 on my perception check)

DM: (rolls the percentile die) High or low?

Elf Rouge: What? I rolled 23.... fine High


Elf Rouge: I'm going to try and pick the lock. (I roll 28 on my thievery check)

DM: (rolls the percentile die) High or low?

Elf Rouge: What? I'm just trying to pick the lock.. did or didn't I?

DM: No


This, I just don't get.  What does this mean anyway?  What IS it that he's doing here... or do you not know either?  

DM: You can't hide, it's part of my story.


DM: You have to, it's part of the story.


DM: You can't go to the capital yet, you have to finish the part of the story here first.


This is the obvious problem part.  I would explain to him (attempting to be diplomatic as I do so) that I'm not playing the game to play out an unchangeable story that he's already written.  I'm here to play my character's adventures, not his NPC's adventures.  I'm the one who makes the decisions on what my PC does and why - NOT HIM.  My characters actions and the details of the unfolding adventure will not be pre-destined by him but determined by my characters reactions to the situations he presents.  Really, if he said anything along those lines just one more time after that I'd politely collect my stuff and go home.  One thing I will not abide is having the DM tell me what my character can't do just because he's planned it differently.

Sorry I didn't write back sooner, I've been kind of busy lately. The "High Low" deal is kind of like flipping a coin except with a percentile die, 0-49 = low 50-100= high. It basically throws skill checks out the window and replaces them with random chance.
I think the dm percentile is really just a smoke screen to appear that something random is happening.  In actuality he's just playing out the plot he has in his mind and and he beleives that the percentile covers up the blatant approach.  As a close friend there probably isn't an easy way to not bruise his feelings.  

The best you can do is try and broach the subject in a way that doesn't verbally beat him over the head with "your game is dumb"  Getting around to saying that you would prefer that the rules be used more in the line as they are written can be done by encouraging other aspects of the game.  Or simply starting a different game until his dming skills evolve into something you find more compatible.
I think the dm percentile is really just a smoke screen to appear that something random is happening.  In actuality he's just playing out the plot he has in his mind and and he beleives that the percentile covers up the blatant approach.  As a close friend there probably isn't an easy way to not bruise his feelings.  

The best you can do is try and broach the subject in a way that doesn't verbally beat him over the head with "your game is dumb"  Getting around to saying that you would prefer that the rules be used more in the line as they are written can be done by encouraging other aspects of the game.  Or simply starting a different game until his dming skills evolve into something you find more compatible.

But his game tottally is dumb, btw.
I'm curious for a status update!

I've only ever seen percentile rolls used in very specific situations in D&D. I've only ever been in one single group where the DM ever said, "high or low" in referrence to a percentile roll, and it was absolutely a home-brewed mechanic, and it was in the second worst group that I've ever been in, with the second worst DM. I've heard of other groups doing this, and in each case the group had had prior experience with the palladium system which runs almost entirely on percentile rolls, modified by character statistics.

If you want to keep playing with him, (If it was me, not only would I stop playing with him, I'd do so in an incredibly rude way and likely hold a seething, health-ruining grudge for years afterwards.) then I would first talk to the rest of the group, ask if they share any of your feelings, and if they don't, tell them that this is something you need to talk to the DM about and they shouldn't worry about it. If they do, come up with an argument explaining why this isn't working for you guys, ideally distilled down into a couple of main points. For those, i'd stick to, "This feels to much like rail-roading for us," and, "we feel like this percentile system you're using is edging out the actual game mechanics." Then outline the kind of game you want to play. Make sure you present all of this in a calm, non-hostile manner, and be clear that you're expressing your gaming needs, not critiquing his performance as a DM. In essence, what you should say is, "We know you've worked really hard for x, but we don't really want x. We would feel a lot more satisfied with our games if you could do y instead."

Personally, I think your best option would be to tell your group that you're going to start doing your own thing outside of the club, and when they see how much better that is, the dissatisfaction that the group will subtly be expressing in the other guy's game will be obvious to him unless he's really obtuse.

Oh all the money that e'er I spent,I spent it in good company And all the harm that e'er I've done, Alas, it was to none but me, And all I've done for want of wit, To memory now I can't recall, So fill to me the parting glass. Good night and joy be with you all

The only time we do high-low rolls is for scenarios that are so far beyond the rules that we use it to arbitrate, or when we get silly and ask, "can I find flour?"  But, never once I have I rolled a for a skill check to be met with a high-low roll.  The instance the OP discusses would cause me to drop from a game almost automatically.  The same goes for basically everyone else in my group.

 

 

1. It doesn't seem your problems come from a Final Fantasy themed genre. They come from a DM who "Railroads" you around.

 

Railroading is bad.

 

2. It seems like most of your ideas are getting blocked as you move from one railroad to another.

 

Blocking is bad.

 

So, what we have is a DM who takes elements of the world and turns them into conductors. You come up with something unplanned, and "No." - you finally reach a decision and you are presented 3 ways to say "Yes, I will help!!" and the DM really cares about whether you Kick in the door or pick the lock. The DM in your game also biases the consequences toward his own story. He seems more concerned about telling you his story than he is about you having a good time, or making your own story within the game - I mean, "His" game.

 

Talk to him about your problem, tell him you feel that you don't have much control over yourself in the world. Discuss the kind of things you want to do in the game, and offer your own idea about what the game should be about. The group and you need to be on one page. It almost sounds like the DM and you aren't "watching the same movie".

 

If he isn't reasonable, start your own game with your other friends, and once they have more fun in your game than his, offer him to join your game.

 

Oh, and... Whenever I use percentage checks, I often allow the character to "enhance" their percentage with a D20 roll of some kind.

 

I like the idea of High-Low rolls but I wouldn't use them very often.

Within; Without.

dotto88 wrote:
Thank you everybody, I didn't expect to get this much help. It seems like unless I can figure something out with him I'll just "Sail a new boat and see who jumps on."

Detoxifier wrote:
Thank you everybody, I didn't expect to get this much help. It seems like unless I can figure something out with him I'll just "Sail a new boat and see who jumps on."

 

 


I would also suggest that if you are writing a lot of material and its taking a sufficient amount of time to prepare that you aren't 'ready yet' then you are writing too much and wasting your time. 

Try running your game more improvisationally and worry less about having it ready ahead of time.  Its more fun and a lot more freeing.  Remember that ultimately the players are unlikely to care at all about anything you write before the start of the game....they care about their story, the story of their characters.  They care about what they want to do, and about accomplishing their own goals....and very little about the background of NPC's in the world. 

So show up ready to make the game about them.  They are the stars of the show.  If you are preparing that much material ahead of time, you are likely focusing on the wrong things. 

I hope this helps...and yes, launch your own game.  Drop that guy.

 

 

As a player I really like it when a DM has prepared the world and "potential plot" so the "figuring things out" part is more complex and in depth.  The more "things are connected" and thought out the more interesting I find it and enjoy play.

 

I would say a balance of preparation and ability to improvise would be the ideal for me. 

dotto88 wrote:
OK, at my High School we have a D&D club. Me and some of my friends joined last fall and everything went well. Some of us had played a little 3.5 but we were all new to 4e. We had a great DM for the first couple months but he had to stop for a while because of familly issues and eventually came back later as a player. After he left we took turns DMing for the second half of school. Me and my pal really enjoyed it and decided we would be interested in doing a campaign during the summer months. 

So fast forward to the end of school and I discover my fried will be going to California for a few weeks. I managed to get a few people from the club together, set up a time and date, and dropped about $35 bucks on supplies (not much, but for a 14yr old with no job it is). Instead of taking turns DMing during the summer i got together a campaign and DMed while my buddies played. It went well until i finished up the first "main" adventure of my campaign. I had begun setting up the next bit but I wasn't ready yet, so I called up my friend who had just gotten back from California. I explained that I needed some time and that if he wanted to he could take over as DM for now. 

I don't want to sound blunt because he's a really good friend but I really hate his campaign. He's a really big fan of Final Fantasy which is fine, but he's drawn alot from it (character names, music, theme, etc.) . Now that i could live with but I just hate the way that things have been going.


Example:

DM: You enter a round room with recently killed bodies,  there are cobwebs hanging from the ceiling and you can see several urns arount the room.

 Lvl 6 Elf Rouge (me): I'm gonna roll perception and search through some of the urns. ( I roll 23 on my perception check)

DM: (rolls the percentile die) High or low?

Elf Rouge: What? I rolled 23.... fine High

DM: You find 50 gold and a piece of cloth.


Example:

DM: You see an abandoned building on the outskirts of town.

Elf Rouge: I'm going to try and pick the lock. (I roll 28 on my thievery check)

DM: (rolls the percentile die) High or low?

Elf Rouge: What? I'm just trying to pick the lock.. did or didn't I?

DM: No

Lvl 7 Dragonborn Blackguard: That's ok, I'll just kick down the door. (rolls 12 on a STR check)

DM: You kick down the door, inside is the captain of the watch, he points his gun at you and a cannon swerves at you.

Elf Rouge: Whoa! A cannon? Really? I'm gonna try and kick up dust and hide behind the door frame! (15 on a bluff check and 27 stealth check)

DM: You can't hide, it's part of my story.


Example:

DM: The guard takes you to the pope to explain the current situation to you.

Pope: We have a thief in our town, I need your help catching him.

DM: You now have the option to answer along the lines of "OK".

Elf Rouge: I don't think I really want to help.

DM: You have to, it's part of the story.


Example:

Elf Rouge: I want to get this dagger appraised. 

Blacksmith: I don't know anything about that, I'm sure you could learn more in the Capital

Elf Rouge: Ok, I'm going to talk to the stable master and go to the capital, -instert name of dragonborn blackguard here- do you want to come with?

Dragonborn Blackguard: Sure, not much is going on here.

DM: You can't go to the capital yet, you have to finish the part of the story here first.

We had to cut our session short today because he didn't have enough of it planned out even though he told me the whole thing was done and ready to play. Then he drops the bomb that "Oh yeah, I was talking with -enter name of senior member of the club who is NOT the leader of the club here- and I'll be DMing at the club this year. My campaign will probably take all of the year so I doubt you'll be able to get yours in."  -_- He tells me this after I spend two and a half months of my summer vacation writing up a back ground story, and filling up a note book with several side quests and a main quest!! 

Yell FUUUUUUUUUU

When I DMed people really seemed to like the way it went. I tried talking to him outside of our sessions, explaining that checks are there for a reason, that I don't think anybody expected a gun and cannon when they joined a sword and sorcery campaign, and that I think that people would like the campaign better if it wasn't so linear, etc. He shrugs it all off and I just want to help!

If anybody has any ideas on what I can do then please, all help is welcome!

PS: Sorry for the long post.

How do you DM?

 

Some people might say  'Well, I'd get them to follow my story, but I'd be far more subtle about it' - for them, it's just goes around comes around.

 

If the dude is not the leader of the club where you are, who cares? He's talking up how he's going to do something which he hasn't gotten permission to do.

Princes of the Apocalypse Actual Play Accounts ( Over seven of 'em! For one campaign! )

 

"In the game there is magic" - Orethalion

 

Only got words in my copy.

 

Philosopher Gamer

@Noon

Any reason for the random old thread necro?

Currently working on making a Dex based defender. Check it out here
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Need a few pre-generated characters for a one-shot you are running? Want to get a baseline for what an effective build for a class you aren't familiar with? Check out the Pregen thread here If ever you are interested what it sounds like to be at my table check out my blog and podcast here Also, I've recently done an episode on "Refluffing". You can check that out here

Matyr wrote:

@Noon

Any reason for the random old thread necro?

Because you refer to your evaluation of a thread necro and possibly it's better to ask pluvious or thadian the question even more so.

Princes of the Apocalypse Actual Play Accounts ( Over seven of 'em! For one campaign! )

 

"In the game there is magic" - Orethalion

 

Only got words in my copy.

 

Philosopher Gamer

Noon wrote:

 

Matyr wrote:

@Noon

Any reason for the random old thread necro?

 

Because you refer to your evaluation of a thread necro and possibly it's better to ask pluvious or thadian the question even more so.

 

True.  They seem equally pointless thread necros.  Yours was just the most recently relevant.

Currently working on making a Dex based defender. Check it out here
Show
Need a few pre-generated characters for a one-shot you are running? Want to get a baseline for what an effective build for a class you aren't familiar with? Check out the Pregen thread here If ever you are interested what it sounds like to be at my table check out my blog and podcast here Also, I've recently done an episode on "Refluffing". You can check that out here
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