So how do *YOU* re-conciliate the size of the material plane and the number of things in it?

24 posts / 0 new
Last post
I'll put this in the DM section because as a DM, I am currently faced with this problem.
I'm writing up a custom world, mainly from scratch, but i'm recycling different ideas and things i have left over from old campaigns. In the end, what I've got so far is roughly 100 pages of microsoft word material -__-.

This may seem petty, and for a lot of you I'm sure this is, but I just cannot be comfortable in saying that the campaign's material plane is the same size as Earth, yet has enough room for everything to fit!
What i'm looking for here is some imput from other DMs. If you guys can share some wisdom/a shoehorn with me i'd greatly appreciate it.  
the easiest solution that i see is relatively small population sizes.
I'll use dragons for an example. with just trying to realistically fit in the dragons alone, it just doesn't seem plausible -magic and all- that all of these things can live with massive overcrowding generally not being a thing, and yet dragon/insert random large magical creature here are still uncommon sightings for common folk. How small would a dragon's territory have to be for it to avoid basically the rest of the world for at least most of the time? A great wyrm dragon (rare, definitely, but they're out there) would basically be forced to be content with a territory of just a few dozen acres, certainly not more than a few miles. This leads me to my question; exactly how many dragons of each species are there in the world at any given time?

my conclusion says that in order for dragons -just dragons and no other races- to have enough room where nearly each adult has their own territory and lair, the population of any given type of dragon would have to be close to the low hundreds. I can accept that, it seems reasonable, if a bit low... But with the alternative, you've got a hundred thousand dragons in the world... Not encroaching on the settlements of the other races would be nearly impossible.
factor in other large predators like chaos rocs and you see the problem that i'm faced with here.

after following that thought train, i would say that reducing the larger or magical predators population to an improbably low number is acceptable in lieu of a better option. this brings me to my next stipulation. 
Humanoid races are arguably a bit trickier to brush under the rug. Since D&D is traditionally set in a medieval setting, the human population would naturally be radically lower than current real life.
Going a step further, I'll also that since they're now forced to share the world with almost uncountable other species rather than hogging the entire globe to themselves, the amount of humans in a d&d world would be even lower than it's real life counterpart for that time period.

The human population is larger than the elves and dwarves, for certain. but what of the halfings and orcs? are they fewer in number by a large maragin, or are they similar to the humans?
humans have many kingdoms set up, as do all of the other races. how do these cities not get annihilated regularly just by being in proximity to large predators?

The second apologetic here is one i'm currently using. the d&d world is twice the physical size of earth, but has equal gravity due to an equal mass and much greater density. the molten core of this world is smaller, with mass being displaced to the underdark tunnels and other empty spaces not found on our world.

currently, i took sleeping pills a little bit ago and thinking is kind of hard right now, so if this entire thing is totally illegible i'll come back and edit it tomorrow.
in the mean time, if you can understand what i was trying to say, i'm asking for your opinions.

Okay, here's my rebuttal to your points:

Earth is BIG. I don't know if you've traveled much, but if your fastest mode of transportation is horseback, it can take you forever to get somewhere. And there can be a lot in between you and the destination.

Nearly everything in the D&D world worth talking about is either a hunter, a predator or a conquerer. This means that things die, a lot.
Take your dragon example: although it doesn't always seem so, dragons are actually quite rare due to being the ultimate prize for hunters. They're also fiercely territorial, so they kill each other as well.
Orcs are another example: they breed quickly, but they have to. If they didn't, all their warmongering and infighting would've wiped out the race a long time ago. 
Combine that with medieval living conditions and the tendency for some races to live in places others wouldn't be caught dead in (underground, in forests, in mountains, on tundras, in swamps), then you'll see that the world can easily house these peoples. 

Magic. Everything you can't explain rationally, you can (and should) explain by magic. It's a fantasy world, after all. It doesn't have to conform to your standards of realism Wink
You're waaaaaaay overthinking this.

Trying to introduce things like "realism" and "physics" and "science" to D&D is a recipe for disaster.
DM advice: 1. Do a Session Zero. 2. Start With Action. 3. Always say "Yes" to player ideas. 4. Don't build railroads. 5. Make success, failure, and middling rolls interesting. Player advice: 1. Don't be a dick. 2. Build off each other, don't block each other. 3. You're supposed to be a badass. Act like it. Take risks. My poorly updated blog: http://engineeredfun.wordpress.com/
I think that if I were a player in your game, I would not concern myself with the population bottleneck of mature dragons and the difficulty in finding diverse enough breeding stock to perpetuate the species while also resolving the need to find adequate roaming territory to feed.

I would concern myself with makin' them dead and takin' their loots.
I believe the answer to all of your questions is "A wizard did it."

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
DMs: Don't Prep the Plot | Structure First, Story Last | Prep Tips | Spoilers Don't Spoil Anything | No Myth Roleplaying
Players: 11 Ways to Be a Better Roleplayer | You Are Not Your Character     Hilarious D&D Actual Play Podcast: Crit Juice!

FREE CONTENT: Encounters With Alternate Goals | Full-Contact Futbol  |  Pre-Gen D&D 5e PCs | Re-Imagining Phandelver | Three Pillars of Immersion | Seahorse Run

Follow me on Twitter: @is3rith

You're waaaaaaay overthinking this.

Trying to introduce things like "realism" and "physics" and "science" to D&D is a recipe for disaster.



This.



Don't worry about realism.  Make the world as big as you need.

Right. Consistency is more important than logic and realism in D&D.

Consistency is a way for the group to be able to make informed decisions; logic and realism are usually a stick to beat down other people's ideas. And silly to boot consider we're playing in an imaginary world with magic and dragons.

No DM has ever looked more ridiculous than when they try to tell a player "no" and use logic and realism to back up their reasoning. You can literally detect the eye-rolling from space.

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
DMs: Don't Prep the Plot | Structure First, Story Last | Prep Tips | Spoilers Don't Spoil Anything | No Myth Roleplaying
Players: 11 Ways to Be a Better Roleplayer | You Are Not Your Character     Hilarious D&D Actual Play Podcast: Crit Juice!

FREE CONTENT: Encounters With Alternate Goals | Full-Contact Futbol  |  Pre-Gen D&D 5e PCs | Re-Imagining Phandelver | Three Pillars of Immersion | Seahorse Run

Follow me on Twitter: @is3rith

Earth is BIG. I don't know if you've traveled much, but if your fastest mode of transportation is horseback, it can take you forever to get somewhere. And there can be a lot in between you and the destination.

This.  In the 19th century during US expansion west, it could take six months to a year to get from the eastern states to California.  Furthermore, who said your world has to be the size of the Earth; it can be bigger you know .

and...
You're waaaaaaay overthinking this.

Trying to introduce things like "realism" and "physics" and "science" to D&D is a recipe for disaster.

This.  In high fantasy, magic explains all.

 

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/19.jpg)

Are you really "entitled to your opinion"?
RedSiegfried wrote:
The cool thing is, you don't even NEED a reason to say yes.  Just stop looking for a reason to say no.
There are lots of whales in the ocean. But I've never seen one there.

Time was, forests were considered dark and forbidding, and they were everywhere. People rarely left their own villages to see for themselves that there weren't monsters everywhere. So, "common" doesn't have to be that common for it to seem common to most people, as long as they're too fearful to find out.

Or: The world doesn't have to be a sphere. Make it an infinite flat plan. Heck, if you want to stick to physics, make it like ringworld, but with an artificial sky. Even if you limit yourself to 1 AU radius and give it a width one 600th of that, you've got a surface area of about three-million Earth-sized planets. Of course, the material it's made out of is magically strong, but fortunately magic exists.

Which is all you need for any solution to this. Heck, if anything with the power of gods exist (or very powerful wizards, as mentioned) then people only know what they gods want them to know, no explanation needed.

[N]o difference is less easily overcome than the difference of opinion about semi-abstract questions. - L. Tolstoy

You're waaaaaaay overthinking this.

Trying to introduce things like "realism" and "physics" and "science" to D&D is a recipe for disaster.



You mean recipe for fun!
My username should actually read: Lunar Savage (damn you WotC!) *Tips top hat, adjusts monocle, and walks away with cane* and yes, that IS Mr. Peanut laying unconscious on the curb. http://asylumjournals.tumblr.com/
One more note, even the Earth's continents were at many points in pre-history a Pangaea (a single landmass).  Imagine a landmass that size in your world; it could take several years to cross.

 

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/19.jpg)

Are you really "entitled to your opinion"?
RedSiegfried wrote:
The cool thing is, you don't even NEED a reason to say yes.  Just stop looking for a reason to say no.
This may seem petty, and for a lot of you I'm sure this is, but I just cannot be comfortable in saying that the campaign's material plane is the same size as Earth, yet has enough room for everything to fit!



A plane is a plane, and a planet is a planet.
A plane contains many planets.
To put it into RL context, our entire universe is located in the Prime, and we have yet to find other plane. 

Now, if you want your main planet to be huge, just go with that. Your planet can be as big or as small as you want it to be.
FWIW [4e designer] baseline assumption was that roughly 70% of your feats would be put towards combat effectiveness, parties would coordinate, and strikers would do 20/40/60 at-will damage+novas. If your party isn't doing that... well, you are below baseline, so yes, you need to optimize slightly to meet baseline. -Alcestis
I agree that imposing physics and other sciences on D&D can be a bad idea, but I don't think it's even necessary here.

As sven said, earth is huge. In a typical Points of Light D&D setting, the "good folk" are huddled in small settlements with vast areas of wilderness in between.

Death is common. Death by getting eaten is common. The typical fantasy world is not a world that needs to worry about overpopulation.

And yeah, dragons are typically rare. Even putting the number in the hundreds seems high to me. Many of the other iconic monsters of D&D are probably quite rare as well.

Remember, a heroic party is not just strolling through the countryside. PCs seek out areas of uncommon power and mystery. Just because they battle strange monsters every day doesn't mean those monsters are ordinary. On the contrary, the PCs adventure is extraordinary. By level 2 they have seen more than the typical commoner sees in a lifetime.

Granted, you can make whatever world you want. You can populate a galaxy-wide mobius strip with trillions of ancient dragons if you like. I just don't think the typical Points of Light setting requires an area larger than Earth to be at least reasonably in line with most basic scientific assumptions.

Hell, my Scales of War game is at level 12 and we haven't even left the valley. Sure, we've done a bit of plane-hopping, but the physical distance we've covered is pretty small. Crazy small compared to the size of the Earth.
Remember, a heroic party is not just strolling through the countryside. PCs seek out areas of uncommon power and mystery. Just because they battle strange monsters every day doesn't mean those monsters are ordinary. On the contrary, the PCs adventure is extraordinary. By level 2 they have seen more than the typical commoner sees in a lifetime.



This is a good point. It's probably very easy to imagine the world overrun with monsters and villains since that is what is "on camera" most of the time. The PCs are the stars and the action revolves in large part around their activities. It's important to remember that things that aren't cool scenes involving monsters and villains aren't actually compelling enough to get screen time and not a reflection of the population density of entirely fictional creatures.

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
DMs: Don't Prep the Plot | Structure First, Story Last | Prep Tips | Spoilers Don't Spoil Anything | No Myth Roleplaying
Players: 11 Ways to Be a Better Roleplayer | You Are Not Your Character     Hilarious D&D Actual Play Podcast: Crit Juice!

FREE CONTENT: Encounters With Alternate Goals | Full-Contact Futbol  |  Pre-Gen D&D 5e PCs | Re-Imagining Phandelver | Three Pillars of Immersion | Seahorse Run

Follow me on Twitter: @is3rith

Earth is BIG. I don't know if you've traveled much, but if your fastest mode of transportation is horseback, it can take you forever to get somewhere. And there can be a lot in between you and the destination.

This.  In the 19th century during US expansion west, it could take six months to a year to get from the eastern states to California.  Furthermore, who said your world has to be the size of the Earth; it can be bigger you know .

and...
You're waaaaaaay overthinking this.

Trying to introduce things like "realism" and "physics" and "science" to D&D is a recipe for disaster.

This.  In high fantasy, magic explains all.



Valid point. I also like the comment someone made about consistency being more important than realism, and that is actually extremely true, i agree with that comment very much.

Personally, I prefer to be able to DM with at least a few motes of both realism and, now that someone mentions it, consistency.

I'm well aware of how big the real world is, having traveled extensively in my youth. My biggest problem wasn't really with fitting in dragons, that was just an example. The larger beasts of D&D dwarf even the largest elephants, with some surpassing even T.Rex in size. Oh, by the way, T.Rex actually exist in D&D as well, so we have to shoehorn them in as well.

But giving each race/tribe/city/species of large predator their proper space for a realistic territory, i'm convinced that you would run out of room before you got halfway through the monster manual, let alone the later books that have even *larger* monsters within.


I'm so overthinking this. 
Earth is BIG. I don't know if you've traveled much, but if your fastest mode of transportation is horseback, it can take you forever to get somewhere. And there can be a lot in between you and the destination.

This.  In the 19th century during US expansion west, it could take six months to a year to get from the eastern states to California.  Furthermore, who said your world has to be the size of the Earth; it can be bigger you know .

and...
You're waaaaaaay overthinking this.

Trying to introduce things like "realism" and "physics" and "science" to D&D is a recipe for disaster.

This.  In high fantasy, magic explains all.



Valid point. I also like the comment someone made about consistency being more important than realism, and that is actually extremely true, i agree with that comment very much.

Personally, I prefer to be able to DM with at least a few motes of both realism and, now that someone mentions it, consistency.

I'm well aware of how big the real world is, having traveled extensively in my youth. My biggest problem wasn't really with fitting in dragons, that was just an example. The larger beasts of D&D dwarf even the largest elephants, with some surpassing even T.Rex in size. Oh, by the way, T.Rex actually exist in D&D as well, so we have to shoehorn them in as well.

But giving each race/tribe/city/species of large predator their proper space for a realistic territory, i'm convinced that you would run out of room before you got halfway through the monster manual, let alone the later books that have even *larger* monsters within.


I'm so overthinking this. 



As far as I'm concerned whatever is over the next hill doesn't exist until someone climbs the hill and goes looking. 

I do almost no preperation though, I aim to run my game with about 80% to 90% improv.

I prepare myself, not material. 
...and in the ancient voice of a million squirrels the begotten chittered "You have set upon yourselves a great and noble task, dare you step further, what say you! What say you!"
As far as I'm concerned whatever is over the next hill doesn't exist until someone climbs the hill and goes looking. 

I do almost no preperation though, I aim to run my game with about 80% to 90% improv.

I prepare myself, not material. 



Excellent notion.

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
DMs: Don't Prep the Plot | Structure First, Story Last | Prep Tips | Spoilers Don't Spoil Anything | No Myth Roleplaying
Players: 11 Ways to Be a Better Roleplayer | You Are Not Your Character     Hilarious D&D Actual Play Podcast: Crit Juice!

FREE CONTENT: Encounters With Alternate Goals | Full-Contact Futbol  |  Pre-Gen D&D 5e PCs | Re-Imagining Phandelver | Three Pillars of Immersion | Seahorse Run

Follow me on Twitter: @is3rith

Earth is BIG. I don't know if you've traveled much, but if your fastest mode of transportation is horseback, it can take you forever to get somewhere. And there can be a lot in between you and the destination.

This.  In the 19th century during US expansion west, it could take six months to a year to get from the eastern states to California.  Furthermore, who said your world has to be the size of the Earth; it can be bigger you know .

and...
You're waaaaaaay overthinking this.

Trying to introduce things like "realism" and "physics" and "science" to D&D is a recipe for disaster.

This.  In high fantasy, magic explains all.



Valid point. I also like the comment someone made about consistency being more important than realism, and that is actually extremely true, i agree with that comment very much.

Personally, I prefer to be able to DM with at least a few motes of both realism and, now that someone mentions it, consistency.

I'm well aware of how big the real world is, having traveled extensively in my youth. My biggest problem wasn't really with fitting in dragons, that was just an example. The larger beasts of D&D dwarf even the largest elephants, with some surpassing even T.Rex in size. Oh, by the way, T.Rex actually exist in D&D as well, so we have to shoehorn them in as well.

But giving each race/tribe/city/species of large predator their proper space for a realistic territory, i'm convinced that you would run out of room before you got halfway through the monster manual, let alone the later books that have even *larger* monsters within.


I'm so overthinking this. 



OK think about this for a moment - remember when we first see the dinosaurs in Jurassic Park.  In that scene you literally see 50+ different dinosaurs some even larger than T-rex co-mingling around a medium sized lake on a fairly small island.  Even real predators like lions in Africa that stake out territories allow plenty of other animals to wander in and through.  It is only when the pride is hungry that they go after a herd of gazelles or zebra.  Same thing can be said of dragons (and T-rex for that matter).  So long as they are left alone, chances are (even "evil") dragons won't chase away EVERYTHING from "their territory.  And this is where adventures come from:

- the dragon that normally sleeps peacefully in the mountain is now attacking villages.  why?
- the gold dragon that protects the villages in her territory was killed by an red dragon that is now terrorizing the land.  Go deal with it.
- a young dragon wandered into the kingdom and has staked out his territory, the king does not like this.  go deal with it.

etc etc etc

 

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/19.jpg)

Are you really "entitled to your opinion"?
RedSiegfried wrote:
The cool thing is, you don't even NEED a reason to say yes.  Just stop looking for a reason to say no.
I'm well aware of how big the real world is, having traveled extensively in my youth. My biggest problem wasn't really with fitting in dragons, that was just an example. The larger beasts of D&D dwarf even the largest elephants, with some surpassing even T.Rex in size. Oh, by the way, T.Rex actually exist in D&D as well, so we have to shoehorn them in as well.

But giving each race/tribe/city/species of large predator their proper space for a realistic territory, i'm convinced that you would run out of room before you got halfway through the monster manual, let alone the later books that have even *larger* monsters within.



I still think you're making a false assumption that there's huge populations of these things. To use your example earlier, you see an Ancient Dragon being squished into a few acres of territory. Do you think an Ancient Dragon would allow that? Hell no, he'd burninate every other dragon around until he had all the room he wanted. Or die trying. And so would every other self-respecting dragon. Hence the low population.

The compendium turns up 401 creatures huge or larger, but the vast majority of those are solos, and most of the rest are elites. This classification makes them rare by definition. They are non-standard monsters.

Filter out elites, solos, and swarms of smaller creatures (sorry, Angry Mob) and we're left with ~35 huge+ standard creatures. Of those 35, it looks like about 20 are predators. That seems totally doable to me, especially considering some of these monsters are aquatic.

It also helps to remember there used to be giant creatures all over Earth too. Not just during the dinosaur era, but later there were all kinds of giant sloths, bears, and other creatures that are relatively recently extinct. And those time periods lasted waaay longer than the anomalous blip that is the world as we know it today.

 One thing to bear in mind is the number of differences between what a "medieval" world would be like and what our own world is like...

  In the US today , a population of 20,000 is a pretty small town. In medieval Europe it was a good-sized city.

  In WWII, 150,000 troops landed on the beach at Normandy during a single military operation. That's roughly about half the troop strength of the entire Roman Empire at one point, including all their conscripts and allies.

 Today, a person can hop in their car and drive several hundred miles in a day. Until the 1950's, the average person never got more than 25-50 miles from home.

 Today we can open our phones and find out exactly where we are in the world down to the last foot and how to get to anywhere else in the world. In the old days, maps were vague and many people couldn't tell you how to get to the capitol city of their nation beyond pointing in it's direction.


 Even today, there are still huge areas of the US where nobody has ever been, vast areas of wilderness still uncharted (except by satellite, lol). The world hasn't changed completely.
 I live in New England, in a place that's just outside the suburbs of a fairly small city.
 Every year, at least one or two people still die from the winter cold and another one or two from the summer heat. There are poisonous spiders and snakes in the woods behind my house. There are herds of deer and wild turkeys in the area, and I've seen a young black bear before - hell, I even came face to face with an extremely lost young moose one winter twenty-five years ago... There's several small mountains within 30 miles of here, a couple of swamps, the ocean, large areas of woodlands and lots of local farms. And I live just five miles from the downtown area of a 40,000-person population.

 In any event, the thing to take away from this post is that an earth-sized planet is huge when viewed from the perspective of a medieval society and in its ability to support wildly diverse ecosystems even within a small geographical area, and there's more than enough room for a dragon on a remote mountain to range for several hundred square miles without coming into ecological conflict with another dragon.

Show

I am the Magic Man.

(Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.)

 

I am the Lawnmower Man.

(I AM GOD HERE!)

 

I am the Skull God.

(Koo Koo Ka Choo)

 

There are reasons they call me Mad...

Remember, a heroic party is not just strolling through the countryside. PCs seek out areas of uncommon power and mystery. Just because they battle strange monsters every day doesn't mean those monsters are ordinary. On the contrary, the PCs adventure is extraordinary. By level 2 they have seen more than the typical commoner sees in a lifetime.



This is a good point. It's probably very easy to imagine the world overrun with monsters and villains since that is what is "on camera" most of the time. The PCs are the stars and the action revolves in large part around their activities. It's important to remember that things that aren't cool scenes involving monsters and villains aren't actually compelling enough to get screen time and not a reflection of the population density of entirely fictional creatures.



One of the things I have planned for the game I would like to run is explaining to the players that unless I describe otherwise alot of the ground they cover is populated.
When they go from major city A to Large city B there will be merchents and travelers and sheperds on the road and they will pass through 1 horse villiages and past large farm steads on the way but unless there is an ambush or a mysteriously empty road I am not going to point out each and every one.
The sea looks at the stabillity of the mountian and sighs. The mountian watches the freedom of the sea and cries.
Remember, a heroic party is not just strolling through the countryside. PCs seek out areas of uncommon power and mystery. Just because they battle strange monsters every day doesn't mean those monsters are ordinary. On the contrary, the PCs adventure is extraordinary. By level 2 they have seen more than the typical commoner sees in a lifetime.



This is a good point. It's probably very easy to imagine the world overrun with monsters and villains since that is what is "on camera" most of the time. The PCs are the stars and the action revolves in large part around their activities. It's important to remember that things that aren't cool scenes involving monsters and villains aren't actually compelling enough to get screen time and not a reflection of the population density of entirely fictional creatures.



One of the things I have planned for the game I would like to run is explaining to the players that unless I describe otherwise alot of the ground they cover is populated.
When they go from major city A to Large city B there will be merchents and travelers and sheperds on the road and they will pass through 1 horse villiages and past large farm steads on the way but unless there is an ambush or a mysteriously empty road I am not going to point out each and every one.



And that is fairly normal with the exception of heavy traveled roads.  My game world map has many cities, but the players pass through numerous small villages that are not on the map, usually dedicated to some sort of argricultural endevour or some mining venture.  And encounter merchant caravans traveling from one locale to another.  But, in the middle ages most roads were only seasonally heavily traveled, specifically when harvests came in.  Much of the time, roads were empty, hence travelers always being on the alert for "highwaymen."

 

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/19.jpg)

Are you really "entitled to your opinion"?
RedSiegfried wrote:
The cool thing is, you don't even NEED a reason to say yes.  Just stop looking for a reason to say no.
I loved "The Highwayman" with Jako and the Orson Wells opening naration.
The sea looks at the stabillity of the mountian and sighs. The mountian watches the freedom of the sea and cries.
I'm surprised no one has mentioned this, but the creatures presented as "natural" in the monster mannuals seem to occupy a relatively small majority, when you facotr in all the elemental, immortal and shadow creatures your left with only a handful actual inhabiting the world constantly, the others can be assumed to be travelers, vacationers etc. I've always assumed creatures such as displacer beasts and gorgon's rarely enter the "natural" world and instead remain with then Feywild, shadowfell or equivalent there of. Also, the world's of D&D are rarely two dimensional, you also have sprawling subterranean caves and passages that can be populated. Also, of those creatures that are considered natural, not all of the need to eat, Warforged and golems are both "natural" but neither actually eats anything.

Further, not all creatures that do eat consume the same things at the same rate as we do. For instance reptiles don't eat nearly as often as we inefficient mammals, a snake can go for a week or so between meals, combine this with the magical natre of a dragon and factoring in the fact that a dragon may spend years, even decades in sleep / contemplation and a young dragon may only emerge from its cave every month or so the gobel up a boar or two before heading back home. Similarily, most plant monsters would subsist on sunlight for the majoirty of there life and only dine on adventurer or peasant from time to time.

Finally, there is no reason to include EVERY creature inthe monster manual in your world, they are merely there so that if you wish to use them you can. If you don't want halflings or any of the goblin races, you don't need to have them.