planeswalker rules

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If anyone knows a page that has all the planeswalker rules on it let me know. I can find some things but not answers to all my questions.

Specifically, can you target a planeswalker with a Boomerang? Or any other spells that target a permanent?
Planeswalkers are permanents, so you can target them with anything that just says "target permanent."

Here's the Comprehensive Rulebook entry on Planeswalkers:
212.9. Planeswalkers

212.9a A player who has priority may play a planeswalker card from his or her hand during a main phase of his or her turn when the stack is empty. Playing a planeswalker as a spell uses the stack. (See rule 409, "Playing Spells and Activated Abilities.")

212.9b When a planeswalker spell resolves, its controller puts it into play under his or her control.

212.9c Planeswalker subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Planeswalker -- Jace." Each word after the dash is a separate subtype. Planeswalker subtypes are also called planeswalker types. Planeswalkers may have multiple subtypes. (You can find the complete list of planeswalker subtypes under "Planeswalker Types" in the glossary at the end of this document.) If two or more planeswalkers that share a planeswalker type are in play, all are put into their owners' graveyards as a state-based effect. See rule 420.5.

212.9d Loyalty is a characteristic only planeswalkers have. The loyalty of a planeswalker not in play is equal to the number printed in its lower right corner. The loyalty of a planeswalker in play is equal to the number of loyalty counters on it. A planeswalker is treated as if its text box included, "This permanent comes into play with a number of loyalty counters on it equal to its printed loyalty number"; this ability creates a replacement effect (see rule 419.1). As a planeswalker gains or loses loyalty, loyalty counters are put on it or removed from it, respectively. Damage dealt to a planeswalker results in that many loyalty counters being removed from it. If a planeswalker's loyalty is 0, it's put into its owner's graveyard as a state-based effect. See rule 420.5.

212.9e Planeswalkers can be attacked. (See rule 308, "Declare Attackers Step.")

212.9f Each planeswalker has a number of activated abilities. A player may play an activated ability of a planeswalker only during a main phase of his or her turn, when he or she has priority and the stack is empty, and only if none of its activated abilities have been played that turn. The cost to play an activated ability of a planeswalker is to put on or remove from that planeswalker a certain number of loyalty counters, as shown by the loyalty symbol in the ability's cost. An ability with a negative loyalty cost can't be played unless the planeswalker has at least that many loyalty counters on it.

212.9g If noncombat damage would be dealt to a player by a source controlled by an opponent, that opponent may have that source deal that damage to a planeswalker the first player controls instead. This is a redirection effect (see rule 419.6c) and is subject to the normal rules for ordering replacement effects (see rule 419.9). The opponent chooses whether to redirect the damage as the redirection effect is applied.

Edit: for good measure, the glossary definition of "permanent" from the Comprehensive Rulebook: "A permanent is any card or token in the in-play zone. See rule 214, 'Permanents.'" Since a Planeswalker is in play, and it's a card, then it must be a permanent.
Also see the less intimidating Planeswalker Rules and our Planeswalker FAQ.

Planeswalkers in play are permanents, you can target them with Boomerang.
If anyone knows a page that has all the planeswalker rules on it let me know. I can find some things but not answers to all my questions.

Comprehensive Rules
212.9. Planeswalkers
212.9a A player who has priority may play a planeswalker card from his or her hand during a main phase of his or her turn when the stack is empty. Playing a planeswalker as a spell uses the stack. (See rule 409, "Playing Spells and Activated Abilities.")

212.9b When a planeswalker spell resolves, its controller puts it into play under his or her control.

212.9c Planeswalker subtypes are always a single word and are listed after a long dash: "Planeswalker -- Jace." Each word after the dash is a separate subtype. Planeswalker subtypes are also called planeswalker types. Planeswalkers may have multiple subtypes. (You can find the complete list of planeswalker subtypes under "Planeswalker Types" in the glossary at the end of this document.) If two or more planeswalkers that share a planeswalker type are in play, all are put into their owners' graveyards as a state-based effect. See rule 420.5.

212.9d Loyalty is a characteristic only planeswalkers have. The loyalty of a planeswalker not in play is equal to the number printed in its lower right corner. The loyalty of a planeswalker in play is equal to the number of loyalty counters on it. A planeswalker is treated as if its text box included, "This permanent comes into play with a number of loyalty counters on it equal to its printed loyalty number"; this ability creates a replacement effect (see rule 419.1). As a planeswalker gains or loses loyalty, loyalty counters are put on it or removed from it, respectively. Damage dealt to a planeswalker results in that many loyalty counters being removed from it. If a planeswalker's loyalty is 0, it's put into its owner's graveyard as a state-based effect. See rule 420.5.

212.9e Planeswalkers can be attacked. (See rule 308, "Declare Attackers Step.")

212.9f Each planeswalker has a number of activated abilities. A player may play an activated ability of a planeswalker only during a main phase of his or her turn, when he or she has priority and the stack is empty, and only if none of its activated abilities have been played that turn. The cost to play an activated ability of a planeswalker is to put on or remove from that planeswalker a certain number of loyalty counters, as shown by the loyalty symbol in the ability's cost. An ability with a negative loyalty cost can't be played unless the planeswalker has at least that many loyalty counters on it.

212.9g If noncombat damage would be dealt to a player by a source controlled by an opponent, that opponent may have that source deal that damage to a planeswalker the first player controls instead. This is a redirection effect (see rule 419.6c) and is subject to the normal rules for ordering replacement effects (see rule 419.9). The opponent chooses whether to redirect the damage as the redirection effect is applied.

Specifically, can you target a planeswalker with a Boomerang? Or any other spells that target a permanent?

When it is In Play, it is a Permanent. Thus, it can be Targeted by anything that Targets a Permanent; Such as Boomerang.
Does doubling season affect a planeswalker? For example, does it come into play with twice as many counters?
Does doubling season affect a planeswalker? For example, does it come into play with twice as many counters?

It does come into play with twice as many counters. Playing the ability of a planewalker which adds counters does not add double the counters because it is a cost and not an effect which is placing those counters.
I'm still a bit confused about attacking a planeswalker.

If you attack with a 1/1, defending player controls a planeswalker and a 1/1. I read you can declare your attack on the planeswalker, can the defending player block the attacking creature with their 1/1 therefore preventing the damage dealt to the planeswalker? or does it not matter and the planeswalker takes the hit regardless?
Are you sure you read that [post=15147400]Planeswalker FAQ entry[/post]? This question is answered there...

But anyway, yes, the defending player can block with the 1/1.

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oh I didn't see that, thanks. I was reading this other article and it said something about how blockers don't care what attacking creatures are attacking. and it said that after an attacking creatures deals damage to a planeswalker, it continues to attack? if it goes unblocked, then it deals no damage, but defending player can block? sorry that article is really confusing.
if it goes unblocked, then it deals no damage, but defending player can block?

If the article said that, then the article is wrong. Or discussing a game other than Magic: The Gathering.

No, I am not a judge. That's why I like to quote sources such as the rules that trump judges.

If i have Ajani Vengeant and target a land but it isn't untapped, then during the same turn he taps the land does it untap during its untap step?
If i have Ajani Vengeant and target a land but it isn't untapped, then during the same turn he taps the land does it untap during its untap step?

Presuming you actually meant to say "is untapped" or "isn't tapped"...

No. Nothing about Ajani Vengeant's first ability cares whether the targeted permanent is actually tapped or not. Granted, the ability won't do a whole lot if used on an untapped permanent, but the "this doesn't untap" effect is still there, and will still have effect if the permanent becomes tapped later on. (And Ajani still gains a loyalty counter regardless.)

Amusingly, you could even play that first ability targeting Ajani Vengeant itself, which might be useful if, say, there were no other legal targets in play for some weird reason.
If i have Ajani Vengeant and target a land but it isn't untapped, then during the same turn he taps the land does it untap during its [sic] untap step?

No.

Ajani Vengeant's first ability:
+1: Target permanent doesn't untap during its controller's next untap step.

Not that ability:
+1: Target tapped permanent doesn't untap during its controller's next untap step.

Not that ability:
+1: Target permanent doesn't untap during its controller's next untap step unless it was untapped.

No, I am not a judge. That's why I like to quote sources such as the rules that trump judges.

oh I didn't see that, thanks. I was reading this other article and it said something about how blockers don't care what attacking creatures are attacking. and it said that after an attacking creatures deals damage to a planeswalker, it continues to attack? if it goes unblocked, then it deals no damage, but defending player can block? sorry that article is really confusing.

I think what the article was probably saying is that if the Planeswalker permanent leaves play for some reason (the afore-mentioned Boomerang, perhaps) after attackers are declared, creatures that were declared as attacking the Planeswalker continue to attack, and may be blocked as normal. Any unblocked creatures attacking the now non-existent Planeswalker deal no damage, since there's no Planeswalker for them to deal damage to.
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Interesting.

So, in a multiplayer free-for-all game, it is my turn and I attack Bob with a Saproling and declare no other creatures as attacking. Tom Shocks Bob, killing him and causing him to leave the game. After all that, Tom can still Condemn my Saproling?
I'm just a Pigment of your imagination.
Interesting.

So, in a multiplayer free-for-all game, it is my turn and I attack Bob with a Saproling and declare no other creatures as attacking. Tom Shocks Bob, killing him and causing him to leave the game. After all that, Tom can still Condemn my Saproling?

Yes. (Or in a 2 player game, you Quicken + Vindicate the planeswalker I'm attacking.)

308.2g Each chosen creature becomes an attacking creature if all costs have been paid, but only if it's still controlled by the active player. It remains an attacking creature until it's removed from combat or the combat phase ends, whichever comes first. See rule 306.4.

Gerdef
Magic Judge Quis custodiet ipsos custodes? Rules Theory and Templating: "They may be crazy, but they're good." --Matt Tabak, Rules Manager*
I'm confused on the redirection rules and combat rules. say I have Story circle in play, and my opponent attacks. does the damage get routed through me, allowing story circle to prevent it, or does it go straight to the planeswalker. It seems weird to me that a planeswalker can be attacked directly, but damage spells are routed through the player.
I'm confused on the redirection rules and combat rules. say I have Story circle in play, and my opponent attacks. does the damage get routed through me, allowing story circle to prevent it, or does it go straight to the planeswalker. It seems weird to me that a planeswalker can be attacked directly, but damage spells are routed through the player.

It does seem weird, but it's correct. It's an unnecessary evil to make sure things work correctly.
So no, you cannot prevent the damage from a creature that is attacking your planeswalker.
It does seem weird, but it's correct. It's an unnecessary evil to make sure things work correctly.
So no, you cannot prevent the damage from a creature that is attacking your planeswalker.

Yes, you can prevent it. With two replacement/prevention effects trying to mess with the same event, the affected player gets to choose the order in which to apply them; if he applies Story Circle first, he can prevent the damage even if it was intended for his Planeswalker (a point on which the opponent doesn't have to commit himself until it's time for that replacement effect to take place).
Jeff Heikkinen DCI Rules Advisor since Dec 25, 2011
I'm confused on the redirection rules and combat rules. say I have Story circle in play, and my opponent attacks. does the damage get routed through me, allowing story circle to prevent it, or does it go straight to the planeswalker. It seems weird to me that a planeswalker can be attacked directly, but damage spells are routed through the player.

It's relatively straightforward to allow the combat rules to cope with creatures attacking planeswalkers as well as players - combat damage gets assigned to a planeswalker rather than a player. It does mean that Story Circle can't protect your planeswalkers from attacking creatures.

When it comes to other ways of damaging planeswalkers, you can't just say "anything that could affect a player can also affect a planeswalker" - there are too many things the game can do to a player that don't really make sense for a planeswalker. You could go with just letting things that actually say they affect planeswalkers (or some group that includes planeswalkers, such as permanents) but then either all the old cards like Shock would be unable to affect planeswalkers, or you'd need a wave of mass errata adding "or planeswalker" to a lot of cards. The option to redirect noncombat damage from a source you control from an opponent to one of that player's planeswalkers was an elegant solution to the immediate problem - that of letting over a decade's worth of old cards treat planeswalkers as though they'd always been a part of the game - though probably not how it would have been done had they been included all along.
M:tG Rules Advisor
Yes, you can prevent it. With two replacement/prevention effects trying to mess with the same event, the affected player gets to choose the order in which to apply them; if he applies Story Circle first, he can prevent the damage even if it was intended for his Planeswalker (a point on which the opponent doesn't have to commit himself until it's time for that replacement effect to take place).

[indent]212.9g If noncombat damage would be dealt to a player by a source controlled by an opponent, that opponent may have that source deal that damage to a planeswalker the first player controls instead. This is a redirection effect (see rule 419.6c) and is subject to the normal rules for ordering replacement effects (see rule 419.9). The opponent chooses whether to redirect the damage as the redirection effect is applied.

310.2b An unblocked attacking creature that’s attacking a player will assign all its combat damage to the defending player. An unblocked attacking creature that’s attacking a planeswalker will assign all its combat damage to the planeswalker it’s attacking. If the creature isn’t currently attacking anything (if, for example, it was attacking a planeswalker that has left play), it will assign no combat damage.[/indent]

With combat damage, it's assigned directly to the planeswalker. There is no redirection, so no chance to apply Story Circle etc.
M:tG Rules Advisor
Sorry, I lost track of the context there for a bit.
Jeff Heikkinen DCI Rules Advisor since Dec 25, 2011
I want to make sure I'm understanding the redirection of spells that would target the player, such as Shock.

If Shock is played on a player who controls a Planeswalker AND Story Circle, could he prevent the damage using Story Circle? Because technically the damage would have to be successful to be redirected towards the Planeswalker, yes? Or would you be able to redirect Shock before Story Circle would be able to prevent the damage? Here's the reason I ask...

[INDENT]212.9g If noncombat damage would be dealt to a player by a source controlled by an opponent, that opponent may have that source deal that damage to a planeswalker the first player controls instead. This is a redirection effect (see rule 419.6c) and is subject to the normal rules for ordering replacement effects (see rule 419.9). The opponent chooses whether to redirect the damage as the redirection effect is applied.[/INDENT]

...The way it looks to be worded seems to state that the damage has to be successful to the player before it can be redirected, but since the redirection is in place so the Planeswalker can be targeted by cards that were in circulation before the Planeswalker was it could also mean that a source of damage originally targeted to a player may now "target Planeswalker."

My theory is that Story Circle wouldn't prevent Shock because it'd be redirected to the Planeswalker.
My theory is that Story Circle wouldn't prevent Shock because it'd be redirected to the Planeswalker.

Wrong.

If the Player plays the ability of the Circle, then there's a Replacement effect (from the Planeswalker) and a Prevention effect (from the Circle) trying to modify how the Shock deals them damage.
They, being the affected player, chooses which Replacement/Prevention effect to apply first.

If they choose to apply the Prevention effect first, then the 2 damage the Shock would deal is prevented, and there's nothing for the Replacement effect to redirect.

However, if (in the HIGHLY unlikely chance) they choose to apply the Replacement effect first, then the Opponent who controls the Shock will choose whether nor not to Redirect the Shocks Damage to the Planeswalker. If the Opponent chooses to, then the Planeswalker is dealt 2 damage and there's nothing for the Prevention effect to prevent. Of, if the Opponent chooses to not have the Damage redirected, it'll be prevented by the Prevention effect.
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