Shadowmoor Spolier: Mirrorweave and Scion of Oona

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My opponent has two faerie tokens from bitterblossom and a scion of oona. I have an Ink-Treader Nephilim and an ink dissolver in play. I cast Mirrorweave on Ink-Treader Nephilim. The two faerie tokens have shroud so I create copies of Mirrorweave for Scion of Oona and Ink Dissolver.
Targeting is read at time of casting and not time of resolution, yes?
So the stack looks like this
1. Mirrorweave target -> Ink-Treader
2. Mirrorweave copy target -> Ink Dissolver
3. Mirrorweave copy target -> Scion of Oona
the last copy of mirrorweave resolves and every creature becomes a copy of Scion of Oona. Does the next copy of Mirrorweave resolve or because all creatures now have shroud, does it fizzle? Mirrorweave targets on casting, but it's effect isn't targeting.

Kindly,
Andrew
My opponent has two faerie tokens from bitterblossom and a scion of oona. I have an Ink-Treader Nephilim and an ink dissolver in play. I cast Mirrorweave on Ink-Treader Nephilim. The two faerie tokens have shroud so I create copies of Mirrorweave for Scion of Oona and Ink Dissolver.
Targeting is read at time of casting and not time of resolution, yes?
So the stack looks like this
1. Mirrorweave target -> Ink-Treader
2. Mirrorweave copy target -> Ink Dissolver
3. Mirrorweave copy target -> Scion of Oona
the last copy of mirrorweave resolves and every creature becomes a copy of Scion of Oona. Does the next copy of Mirrorweave resolve or because all creatures now have shroud, does it fizzle? Mirrorweave targets on casting, but it's effect isn't targeting.

Kindly,
Andrew

Spells that target require a valid target when they are cast, and they check that target again when they are about to resolve. If the target was legal originally, but becomes illegal prior to resolution, then the spell will be countered on resolution for having no legal targets. Both items 1 and 2 in your scenario will fizzle.
I'm just a Pigment of your imagination.
ok next question, what is there was no scion of oona instead the stack looks like this

1. Mirrorweave target -> Ink-Treader Nephilim
2. Mirrorweave copy target -> Eager Cadet
3. Mirrorweave copy target -> ink dissolver

The first one resolves, checks target, sees an ink dissolver and every creature becomes and ink dissolver, the second goes to resolution but sees an ink dissolver where an eager cadet used to be. Does it still resolve or do 1 and 2 fizzle do to targeting? I'm assuming this does work becuase the name of the card isn't important, just that it's there and doesn't make the original target illegeal.
There's a huge FAQ on copying linked at the top of the page.
And copy effects are in the list of copyable effects.
There's a huge FAQ on copying linked at the top of the page.
And copy effects are in the list of copyable effects.

can you explain how copy effects are in the list of copyable effects, has to deal with my question?

Even if every creature is a copy of ink-treader, ink-treader only makes copies when spells are played, copies aren't played hence don't trigger his ability creating an infinite loop.

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just to restate the question, targeting is checked twice so

1. each copy of mirrorweave contains the info of it's original target
2. When the copy goes to resolve it will check for it's target
3. the target here eager cader is now a copy ink dissolver
4. does mirrorweave re-read the target creature eager cadet and take the info of the copy ink dissolver or does it merely check that the target is legal and then resolve changing all creatures into copies of of eager cadet?

Thanks,
Andrew
I might be able to help you if I knew what the hell Mirrorweave does.

DCI Level 2 Judge

 

"That's what's so stupid about the whole magic thing, you know," Rincewind said. "You spend twenty years learning the spell that makes nude virgins appear in your bedroom, and then you're so poisoned by quicksilver fumes and half-blind from reading old grimoires that you can't remember what happens next."

- Terry Pratchett, The Colour Of Magic

I might be able to help you if I knew what the hell Mirrorweave does.

Mirrorweave()()
Instant

Each other creature becomes a copy of target nonlegendary creature until end of turn.
All Mirrorweave cares about is that it's a creature and it can be targetted. The copies will resolve just fine. They won't do much though, they'll just turn all creatures into Ink Dissolver again.

DCI Level 2 Judge

 

"That's what's so stupid about the whole magic thing, you know," Rincewind said. "You spend twenty years learning the spell that makes nude virgins appear in your bedroom, and then you're so poisoned by quicksilver fumes and half-blind from reading old grimoires that you can't remember what happens next."

- Terry Pratchett, The Colour Of Magic

Are you sure about that? The target was read before the first one resolves, so you're saying that when mirrorweave rechecks the target before resolution it would then change to the copied charateritics? Let's go through this again really quickly:

1. Mirrorweave 1 target -> Ink-Treader Nephilim
2. Mirrorweave 2 copy target -> Eager Cadet
3. Mirrorweave 3 copy target -> ink dissolver

3. Mirrorweave 3 resolves, all creatures become indissolver
2. Mirrorweave 2 rechecks it's target, the target is now an inkdissolver, hence mirrorweave 2 now changes it's information from eager cadet to ink dissolver?
3. Mirrorweave 2 resolves and all creatures become ink dissolver, again

from the rules section:
413.2a If the spell or ability specifies targets, it checks whether the targets are still legal. A target that's moved out of the zone it was in when it was targeted is illegal. Other changes to the game state may cause a target to no longer be legal; for example, its characteristics may have changed or an effect may have changed the text of the spell. If the source of an ability has left the zone it was in, its last known information is used during this process. The spell or ability is countered if all its targets, for every instance of the word "target," are now illegal. If the spell or ability is not countered, it will resolve normally, affecting only the targets that are still legal. If a target is illegal, the spell or ability can't perform any actions on it or make the target perform any actions.
Example: Aura Blast is a white instant that reads, "Destroy target enchantment. Draw a card." If the enchantment isn't a legal target during Aura Blast's resolution (say, if it has gained protection from white or left play), then Aura Blast is countered. Its controller doesn't draw a card.
Example: Plague Spores reads, "Destroy target nonblack creature and target land. They can't be regenerated." Suppose the same animated land is chosen both as the nonblack creature and as the land, and the color of the creature land is changed to black before Plague Spores resolves. Plagues Spores isn't countered because the black creature land is still a legal target for the "target land" part of the spell."

I was under the impression that when a spell checked the second time it was merely looking for legality of target and that the original information it picked up on targeting wasn't changed.

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I was under the impression that when a spell checked the second time it was merely looking for legality of target and that the original information it picked up on targeting wasn't changed.

Aside from the check for legality, there is no "original information it picked up on targeting".

413.2f If an effect requires information from the game (such as the number of creatures in play), the answer is determined only once, when the effect is applied. If the effect requires information from a specific object, including the source of the ability itself, the effect uses the current information of that object if it hasn’t changed zones; otherwise, the effect uses the last known information the object had before leaving the zone it was expected to be in. There are two exceptions: (1) if an effect deals damage divided among some number of creatures or players, the amount and division were determined as the spell or ability was put into the stack (see rule 402.6), and (2) static abilities can’t use last known information (see rule 412.5). If the ability text states that an object does something, it’s the object as it exists—or as it most recently existed—that does it, not the ability.

Let's call the creatures C1, C2, and C3. Originally we have:

C1 is named Ink-Treader Nephilim (and has the corresponding characteristics)
C2 is named Eager Cadet
C3 is named Ink Dissolver

The original Mirrorweave's target is C1. The copies target C2 and C3 in that order (i.e., the copy targetting C3 is on top of the stack).

The top copy resolves. The characteristics of C3 (name Ink Dissolver, etc.) are copied to C1 and C2.

C1 is now named Ink Dissolver
C2 is now named Ink Dissolver
C3 is still named Ink Dissolver

The next copy resolves. The characteristics of C2 (name Ink Dissolver, etc.) are copied to C1 and C3.

C1, C2, C3 are still named Ink Dissolver

The original resolves. The characteristics of C1 (yadda yadda yadda) are copied to C2 and C3.

C1, C2, C3 are still named Ink Dissolver
No, I am not a judge. That's why I like to quote sources such as the rules that trump judges.
I was under the impression that when a spell checked the second time it was merely looking for legality of target and that the original information it picked up on targeting wasn't changed.

You thought wrong. A spell does NOTHING until it resolves. Nothing. You don't need the comp rules to tell you that. It's simple common sense. (And before anyone says "Storm", that's an ability of a spell, not the spell itself.)
Ok gotcha. Yeah, I thought that with copying it read the information at time of targeting, I didn't know about rule 402, I thought this mostly because Shapesharer has a rule that states even if the target it's copying becomes illegal it still becomes a copy of the target. Anyway, didn't know.

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Ok gotcha. Yeah, I thought that with copying it read the information at time of targeting, I didn't know about rule 402, I thought this mostly because Shapesharer has a rule

It doesn't have any rules.
that states even if the target it's copying becomes illegal it still becomes a copy of the target. Anyway, didn't know.

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If the target it's copying becomes illegal but is still present, the current copiable characteristics of the original are copied.
No, I am not a judge. That's why I like to quote sources such as the rules that trump judges.