Discard

2 posts / 0 new
Last post
You play Chain of Smog and then the opponent copies it and you discard Guerilla Tactics. Does it deal 4 damage?
Yes. Your opponent is the controller of the copy.
rulebook quotes
Control, Controller
A permanent’s controller is whoever put it into play unless the spell or ability that put the permanent into play states otherwise. Other effects can later change a permanent’s controller.
A spell or activated ability on the stack is controlled by whoever played it. A copy of a spell is controlled by the player who put it on the stack. A triggered ability on the stack is controlled by the player who controlled its source at the time it triggered, unless it’s a delayed triggered ability. The controller of a delayed triggered ability is the player who controlled the spell or ability that created it.
Objects in zones other than in play or the stack have no controller. If anything asks for the controller of an object that doesn’t have a controller, use its owner instead.

503.10. To copy a spell or activated ability means to put a copy of it onto the stack; a copy of a spell or ability isn’t “played.” A copy of a spell or ability copies both the characteristics of the spell or ability and all decisions made when it was played, including modes, targets, the value of X, and additional or alternative costs. (See rule 409, “Playing Spells and Activated Abilities.”) Choices that are normally made on resolution are not copied. If an effect of the copy refers to objects used to pay its costs, it uses the objects used to pay the costs of the original spell or ability. A copy of a spell is owned by the player who controlled the spell or ability that created it. A copy of a spell or ability is controlled by the player who put it on the stack. A copy of a spell is itself a spell, even though it has no spell card associated with it. A copy of an ability is itself an ability.
Example: A player plays Fork, targeting an Emerald Charm. Fork reads, “Put a copy of target instant or sorcery spell onto the stack, except that it copies Fork’s color and you may choose new targets for the copy.” Emerald Charm reads, “Choose one — Untap target permanent; or destroy target non-Aura enchantment; or target creature loses flying until end of turn.” When the Fork resolves, it puts a copy of the Emerald Charm on the stack. The copy has the same mode that was chosen for the original Emerald Charm. It does not necessarily have the same target, but only because Fork allows choosing of new targets.
Example: Fling is an instant that reads, “As an additional cost to play Fling, sacrifice a creature.” and “Fling deals damage equal to the sacrificed creature’s power to target creature or player.” When determining how much damage a copy of Fling deals, it checks the power of the creature sacrificed to pay for the original Fling.