Cervid's Guide to Green Multiplayer Cards and Strategy

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Cervid’s Guide to Green Multiplayer Cards and Strategy
IMAGE(http://mi.wizards.com/global/images/magic/general/verdant_force.jpg)IMAGE(http://mi.wizards.com/global/images/magic/general/spike_weaver.jpg)IMAGE(http://mi.wizards.com/global/images/magic/general/gaeas_cradle.jpg)



Table of Contents:
1. Introduction
2. Card Elements and Roles
• 2a. Cockroach Cards
• 2b. Gorilla Cards
• 2c. Pigeon Cards
• 2d. Rattlesnake Cards
• 2e. Spider Cards
• 2f. Combined Element Cards
3. Other Green Power Cards/Types
• 3a. Land Acceleration
• 3b. Mana Acceleration
• 3c. Dealing with Fliers
• 3d. Trampling
• 3e. Lands
4. Artifacts
5. Splashing other colors
• 5a. Red Cards
• 5b. White Cards
• 5c. Blue Cards
• 5d. Black Cards
6. Synergy and Strategies
7. Sample Deck Lists
8. Cards Everyone Should Have
9. Multiplayer Theory
10. Conclusion

1. Introduction

You're in the old western United States during the time of cowboys. There's a showdown on the street to take place between multiple parties. You grab your reliable revolver and head out to the scene. The problem is, when you arrive, the other gunslingers are toting tommy guns. They're ready to deal with multiple threats, and no matter how fast you can draw that revolver, your 6 bullets aren't going to be enough.



This is the situation that many duelists find themselves in when they head into a group of experienced multiplayer pilots and their decks. Sure, your dueling deck may be a finely tuned machine, capable of laying waste to a single opponent faster than you can say Force of Will. However, once you've killed that player, what are you gonna do about the other players looking at you from across the table?

In this guide I'm going to go over cards that are particularly suited for multiplayer, so that you can build your very own multiplayer deck. Many of the cards you may be accustomed to in dueling may be too narrow in scope or effect for multiplayer. Yes, counterspells can still be effective, burn can still kill creatures and players, but the cards that you choose to use may be different. My hope is to bring some understanding to those getting into the very different format of multiplayer, and my focus will be on Green.

2. Card Elements and Roles
If you're used to playing Green in dueling (mono-colored or otherwise) the biggest difference you're going to see when switching to multiplayer is less stompy creatures. Normally you'd love to play your Silhana Ledgewalker, slap on a Moldervine Cloak, and commence beating. The problem is, this isn't going to work in a multiplayer game. You have more than one opponent to worry about attacking you or dealing with your creature. In multiplayer, you're going to want cards that are good in the late game. Sure, you can still play early drops, you still want a good mana curve, but make sure those cards are more like Quirion Ranger and less like Pouncing Jaguar. You want to think <strong>BIG</strong>!
Luckily we're talking about Green, so if it's not already <strong>BIG</strong> then we can have it <strong>GROW!</strong>

2a. Cockroach Cards
Cockroach cards are those that present repeatable, persistent effects. This is especially important in multiplayer for a few reasons: games are longer, you have more card disadvantage compared to your opponents (if you have 5 opponents, they draw 5 cards every round, whereas you draw 1), and there is more removal and hate simply due to the additional number of players and cards.
Green has a plethora of cockroach cards and effects, so let's take a look:
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Persistent cards/effects:
Rancor: Green loves to make its creatures hit harder and give them trample, and this might be the best, repeatable way to do so.
Aspect of Mongoose: a persistent way to protect a creature from being targeted.
Eternal Witness: Play her and go shopping in your graveyard. Amazing card for re-using cards.
Gaea's Blessing: anti-mill, and card reccursion.
Stampeding Wildebeests/Stampeding Serow: they don't gain any benefit from returning to play, but when you combine the upkeep with Eternal Witness, Spike Weaver, or Wall of Blossoms then you begin to see the power.
Evolution Charm: I included this not because it is the best way to re-use creatures from your graveyard (green is very good at this), but because it also packages two other excellent effects.
Genesis: constantly returns creatures to your hand. Very good.
Gigapede: not my favorite creature, but its hard to say no to a 6/1 that can't be targeted and refuses to stay away for long.
Grizzly Fate: 4 creatures from one card if you use buyback, or possibly 8 creatures if you have threshold. Not too shabby.
Groundskeeper: Green likes bringing its lands into play, and it likes to sacrifice them as well. This lets you bring them back to do it all over again.
Life from the Loam: re-use those lands, then re-use the spell!
Loaming Shaman: can put your entire graveyard back into your library, but can still leave Genesis behind where it likes to be.
Weatherseed Treefolk: he beats, and if he dies, he comes back and beats some more, and if he dies, he comes back and beats some more, and if he dies...
Silvos, Rogue Elemental: Green has a lot of ways to regenerate creatures, and creatures that can regenerate. I am including Silvos because he is simply amazing.
Crush of Wurms/Roar of the Wurm: massice mana cost, massice flashback mana cost, but an equally massive effect! Good thing green is not short on mana.
Parallel Evolution: another flashback card, not cheap, but allows you to double you creature tokens a couple times.

Repeatable cards/effects:
Doubling Season: put one token into play? No. Put two into play!
Centaur Glade: create centaurs an instant speed without having to use up a card. The more you create, the better card advantage you achieve.
Exploration: not sure if this counts as repeatable, but it does allow you to repeatedly lay an extra land each turn.
Survival of the Fittest: not good in every deck, but a deck built around it can be quite good.
Tranquil Grove: repeatedly clear the board of enchantments.
Squirrel Nest: repeatedly make squirrels. If you're feeling cheap you can combine this with Earthcraft.
Jedit Ojanen of Efrava: extra cats.
Living Hive: extra insects.
Nacatl War-Pride: an army of cats.
Nemata, Grove Guardian: repeatedly make saprolings. Very good card in a saproling deck!
Squirrel Wrangler: more squirrel making.
Wurmcalling: create wurms and buyback. Very nice.
Arashi, the Sky Asunder: cards with multiple uses are always good in multiplayer. This guy likes to clear the skies.
Quirion Ranger: simply an amazing creature! There are so many tricks with this elf.
Ursapine: pumpatron!
Skyshroud Elf: mana fixer at a 1:1 ratio for colorless into or .
Orochi Leafcaller: mana fixer at a 1:1 ratio for into any color.
Kamahl, Fist of Krosa: repeatable land animate and overrun. Hello, card advantage!



2b. Gorilla Cards
Gorilla cards/effects are those that pound the board and gain you massive card advantage in one fell swoop. Let me say, that this is not Green's forte. Green doesn't deal in destroying creatures (unless they have wings, don't ask me why). It will destroy lands, but not all of them. However, what Green does do, and has grown incredibly efficient at doing, is destroying enchantments (and to a lesser extent flying creatures and artifacts). Not only does it destroy them, but in addition to using the clumsy, unguided dirty bombs that other colors use, Green has developed an array of cruise missiles that can be much more specific about its mass removal of enchantments. Let's take a look at the Hall of Fame of enchantment hate:

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Tranquility: don't care, don't wanna know, they're all dead. The Wrath of God of enchantment removal.
Multani's Decree: destroy them all, and gain life too.
Calming Verse: destroy everyone's but yours (if you play it correctly).
Primeval Light: destroy all...but only target player's.
Root Greevil: destroy all...but only of color X.
Tranquil Domain: destroy all...but only non-Auras.
Serene Heart: destroy all...but only Auras.

Seeds of Innocence: all artifacts are gone, they can't regenerate, but their controllers get to gain life.
Whirlwind: crash and burn, fliers!
Chain of Acid: an interesting card, especially when paired with a White rattlesnake like Karmic Justice.

Lure effect plus Basilisk effect: so, I lied a little. Green will destroy creatures, but only if another creature kills them (or poisons them) on its own.

Biorhythm: I wasn't sure where to put this, but I suppose it falls in nicely here. This card will probably do more damage than any red spell will at the table.


2c. Pigeon Cards
Pigeon cards/effects are those that improve as more players sit down at the table. Their effects (or bodies) grow in relation to the number of people in your game. Green has many cards like this, so let's take a look at them:
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Verdant Force: the more people at the table, the more saprolings you'll have. One of my all-time favorite multiplayer fatties.
Verdant Embrace: give a creature Verdant Force's ability!
Awakening: the more players there are, the more everyone gets to untap! (It should be noted that this card should be used carefully, because unless your deck is built around abusing it, it will help your opponents tremendously as well.)
Seedborn Muse: the more players there are, the more YOU get to untap!
Seed the Land: lots of snakes! Fun with Brand. (Without Brand, its a "help everyone" card.)
Multani, Maro-Sorcerer: really, really big.
Lhurgoyf: more players = more dead creatures.
Stag Beetle: can get quite large.
Traproot Kami: Green is a common color in multiplay, so it goes without saying that forests will be common as well, which means this guy can get huge.
Essence Warden: more players = more creatures = more life.
Copperhoof Vorrac: absolutely huge! Combine with Awakening and slap on Rancor and swing.
Dirtcowl Wurm: more players = more land plays.
Kavu Predator: more players = more lifegain (a lot of people run some sort of life gain in multiplayer) and can be fun when combined with Reverent Silence.
Forgotten Ancient: more players = more spells!


2d. Rattlesnake Cards
Rattlesnake cards/effects are those that warn off attackers (or any sort of offensive spell against you). They can serve their purpose without ever doing anything if they are scary enough that each opponent hopes someone else will have to deal with it. Green's most common rattlesnake comes in the form of a large body. After all, who wants to attack into a Silvos, Rogue Elemental? Or who wants to suffer the wrath of Silvos, Verdant Force, and his other green buddies if your attack doesn't draw a killing blow? However, Green is not without its subtler rattlesnake effects, so let's take a look:
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Seal of Primordium: don't attack me or I'll take out one of your toys!
Basilisk effects are a perfect example of a rattlesnake effect. Cockatrice kills Akroma, how's that for saying "don't attack me!"
Spike Weaver: don't attack me, I'll just Fog.
Viridian Zealot: normally wouldn't consider a card like this to be MP friendly, but with green's ability to re-use creatures, this will make an enchantment or artifact user hesitant about ******* you off.
Elephant Grass: ya, it has a cumulative upkeep, but bear in mind that the upkeep buys you safety from more than just one attack.


2e. Spider Cards
Spider cards/effects surprise or trap your opponent(s). Green has many cards like this (although in a few broad categories), so let's get into them:
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Fog effects: just when someone thinks they've got you after you tap out your creatures, pull this on them. This type of spider effect can lead into a rattlesnake effect, where the opponent always thinks attacking you is futile.
Lure effects: force your opponent to mass block one creature, while the rest pass by and smash face. There are creatures with this ability tied into them as well, such as Taunting Elf (it's fun to imagine big green creatures running by as the poor little, frail elf, slinging insults at his blockers, gets horribly destroyed and beaten beyond all recognition).
Giant Growth effects: Just when your opponent thinks he can safely block your 3/3 with his 3/5, you can pull this on him. Similar to the Fog effects, in that it leaves a bad taste in your opponent's mouth, and soon every card in your hand looks like a Giant Growth effect. Overrun is a favorite in this category, though not a combat trick.
Wurmweaver Coil: once again, just when it looks like you're tapped out, you can sacrifice this and put a large body in the way of an incoming attacker.


2f. Combined Element Cards
These cards combine more than one of the abilities we just talked about. Here they are, with the different aspects they embody:
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Cockroach/Rattlesnake: Green has several critters that fit this bill. Most of them do so by leaving a little present when they die.
Symbiotic Wurm: if you kill him, you have to deal with lots of little ones, which are much more fun to Overrun with than a single beat stick.
Penumbra Wurm: kill him and he comes back as a black version of himself.
Protean Hulk: here's a beatstick that no one would dare kill, but if they do, he goes and gets lots of friends.

Cockroach/Pigeon:
Molder Slug: he eats artifacts. All day long. (Included as also being pigeon because your card advantage can grow as more players are added.)

Cockroach/Spider:
Constant Mists: as long as you have lands, and a way to get them back, this baby becomes amazing
Moment's Peace: another fog ability, this time using flashback.

Rattlesnake/Gorilla/Cockroach:
Silklash Spider: trust me, fliers won't be coming your way.
Tranquil Grove: destroy all enchantments; repeatable.


3. Other Green Power Cards/Types
Green is its own unique color. It doesn't have a lot of mass destruction, it doesn't have a lot of mass damage. However, it does have tricks that no other color can pull off, so let's take a look at some of those:

3a. Land Acceleration: No other color can accelerate its land base like green. Not only does accelerating your land help you play big spells sooner, but it thins your deck so you aren't drawing land late in the game. Green is the only color that does this efficiently, and frequently. Let's look at some of the ways Green achieves this:
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Yavimaya Elder: simply a fantastic card. One card allows you to not only draw a card, but search for two basic lands and put them into your hand. You can even block with him once!
Crop Rotation: so powerful that the only format it is legal in is Vintage (where it is restricted), it allows you to sacrifice any land, to search for any land. Turns a Forest into a Gaea's Cradle or Tolarian Academy. Extremely strong, and most casual groups won't care if you include one in your deck.
Kodama's Reach: just an amazing card for land acceleration.
Explosive Vegetation: two basic lands into play tapped.
Harrow: sacrifice a land and put two basic land into play untapped! Try using this on Flagstones of Trokair for extra fun!
Hunting Wilds: nice because its two forests, and not basic lands, allowing you to search for Taigas, Bayous, Savannahs, or Tropical Islands.
Krosan Tusker: when you cycle him, not only do you get to draw a card, but you get to put a basic land in your hand as well.
Reap and Sow: good double duty. Destroy a land and/or put a land into play untapped. Note that it says land, not basic, so you can grab any land you like.
Steve: he's a great guy!
Scouting Trek+Clear the Land: always a fun way to put some basic lands into play and thin your deck!
Seek the Horizon: go grab 3 basic land.
Sylvan Scrying: pick a land, any land! This is a Demonic Tutor for a land.
Exploration: play an additional land each turn.
Gaea's Touch: play an additional land each turn, if that land is a forest.
Fastbond: restricted in Vintage, but amazing.
Azusa, Lost but Seeking: two additional lands each turn!
Burgeoning: helps get that land onto the table.



3b. Mana Acceleration: this is different from land acceleration, in that we're gaining mana resources fast, and not necessarily lands. Let's take a look (this is just a small sampling):
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Eladamri's Vineyard: free mana. Careful, it can manaburn you.
Magus of the Vineyard: same as above, but with a body.
Birds of Paradise: a classic, and for good reason.
Llanowar Elves: also a classic, and also for good reason.
Priest of Titania: can produce truckloads of mana with some elves in play; especially if some of those elves happen to be our friend Quirion Ranger.
Rofellos, Llanowar Emissary: double your forest mana, double your fun!
Citanul Hierophants: lots of creatures helps produce lots of mana, helps produce more creatures, helps produce more mana, etc.
Elves of Deep Shadow: this one dabbles in black.
Joiner Adept: create any color of mana with your lands.
Utopia Tree: the tree that birds of paradise nest in.
Vine Trellis: a blocker and a mana source.


3c. Dealing with Fliers: Although Green is an incredibly strong color for creatures, often getting more beef(P/T) for the buck(mana), Green has some issues with fliers (it doesn't have many). I'd like to talk about some ways you may choose to deal with this blindspot, because although Green doesn't have many creatures that fly, it sure has ways to bring fliers down.
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Silklash Spider: mentioned above, this spider loves to catch fliers in her nets.
Arashi, the Sky Asunder: also talked about earlier. Cards with multiple uses are always good in multiplayer. This guy likes to clear the skies.
Goliath Spider: this spider, and many others like it, are adept at blocking fliers.
Tornado Elemental: ravages fliers when it comes into play, then does its best Thorn Elemental impression.
Traproot Kami: second mention for this defender as well.
Whirlwind: bye-bye, fliers!
Hurricane: damage to fliers and players.
Dense Canopy: I can't block your fliers? Ok, your fliers can't block my guys on the ground!
Crash Landing: one of the closest things to creature removal that green has.
Downdraft: repeatedly bring down those fliers to get pounded by your fatties. Akroma looks impressive with all her abilities up in the sky, but if Verdant Force gets his hands on her, she becomes Akroma, Angel of Many Pieces Strewn Throughout the Forest.

Now, of the few fliers that green does have, there are a few that stand out:
Jugan, the Rising Star: big flying dragon. He also synergizes well with the recent simic/graft themes.
Killer Bees: starts small, but can get really big, really fast.
Unyaro Bees: similar to the killer bees above, but this guy can sting at instant speed. However, as with real bees, they die when they do.


3d. Trampling: Since we don't have many creatures that fly, we don't have shadow, we don't have fear, but we do have lots of muscle, we trample. Oh, do we ever trample! As a Green player, your signature evasion ability isn't very subtle. You want your creatures to run straight at their blockers, hit them, knock them down, walk on top of them, and use their body as a spring board to smash face. You are going to trample over. Think Incredible Hulk, think Godzilla, think King Kong, think Waterboy. Here's how you're going to do it:
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Tacklin' Fuel:
Rancor: if your creatures didn't start out with trample, they have it now, and a little extra muscle, too.
Berserk: a classic, and out of reach of most budgets, but it is incredible.
Gaea's Embrace: this is a permanent Giant Growth, Regenerate, and Primal Frenzy all rolled into one.
Wild Size: is another combat trick that gives trample and pumps.
Mythic Proportions: this card's title not only describes its effect, but also its mana cost.
Overrun: "Let's roll."
Predator's Strike: it's a Giant Growth, but for :1: more we add trample.
Primal Rage: I trample, you trample, we all trample.
Strength in Numbers: attack with 7 saprolings and a Verdant Force, then hit any unblocked critter with this bomb (or a blocked critter if you want to kill something badly).
Sylvan Might: this gets mention because its good, and it serves double time.
Baru, Fist of Krosa: gets excited when forests come into play.
Kamahl, Fist of Krosa: hands out Overrun juice boxes.
Brawn: in his memory, everone decides to trample.
Cytospawn Shambler: he deals in +1/+1 counters and trample.

Notable Linebackers (creatures with trample):
Silvos, Rogue Elemental: the best singular beatstick at your disposal. He's undercosted (converted mana cost of 6), huge, regenerates, and tramples.
Spectral Force: huge body with trample with a drawback thats easy to overcome with Quirion Ranger, Seedborn Muse, or Awakening.
Stampeding Wildebeests: not the biggest bodied trampler, but has a nice ability that combos well with "comes into play" creatures.
Weatherseed Treefolk: just a solid, recurring, trampler.
Bringer of the Green Dawn: trampler that creates little beasts.
Child of Gaea: another drastically undercosted regenerating trampler, but this time with a small upkeep of .
Force of Nature: undercosted trampler, but with a hefty upkeep of .
Force of Savagery: undercosted, but you need an effect like Gaea's Anthem to keep it around, but you can tell by its P/T investment that it likes nothing more than to trample.
Groundbreaker: its a green Ball Lightning. A nicely costed, one-turn trampler.
Kavu Predator: starts small, grows fast, tramples.
Kodama of the North Tree: another undercosted trampler, this one has shroud.
Living Hive: not only does it trample, but it makes little insect tokens when it does.
Molimo, Maro-Sorcerer: with all those lands you'll be grabbing, he'll be big.
Panglacial Wurm: since we're searching our library for lands, might as well grab a fatty.
Penumbra Wurm: if he dies, he comes back to trample all over again.


3e. Lands: The following is a list of specialty lands that you may want to use in your decks.
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Boseiju, Who Shelters All: if the players in your meta like to run counterspells, this should help you get out some of your non-creature spells.
Flagstones of Trokair: if you're playing any combo of Green and White, this is the perfect land to target with your Crop Rotation or Harrow.
Gaea's Cradle: a personal favorite; lots of mana.
Kor Haven/Maze of Ith: good protection from creatures.
Pendelhaven: classic land for Green. Does the same job as a forest, but saves your elves from many board burning, or targeted burn effects.
Shivan Gorge: another good one when splashing colors.
Yavimaya Hollow: regenerate any creature; very nice.
Arena: if you just need to kill that one creature your opponent has out, here's your answer.
Cloudpost: not that green has any trouble with mana, but...
Forbidden Orchard: the drawback is fairly diluted in multiplayer. You may even make an ally.
Heart of Yavimaya: not quite Pendelhaven, but its ok.
Llanowar Reborn: good syngery with grafting.
Novijen, Heart of Progress: more synergy with +1/+1 counters.
Okina, Temple to the Grandfathers: if you're playing with enough legendaries.
Skarrg, the Rage Pits: pretty solid.
Swarmyard: could be useful in the right deck.
Svogthos, the Restless Tomb: same as above.
Thawing Glaciers: an oldie, but a goodie.
Tower of the Magistrate: say no to artifacts.
Vesuva: simply good.
Vitu-Ghazi, the City-Tree: puts saprolings into play.
Wirewood Lodge: untapping Priest of Titania or Rofellos, Llanowar Emissary is a beautiful thing.



4. Artifacts
Artifacts can be used to make up for weaknesses that cannot be filled by a green card. So, let's think. What can't Green do (in general)?
• Destroy creatures
• Direct damage
However, artifacts can also be used to bolster our strengths. If we have more land/mana, then we can play more expensive effects. If we have bigger, stronger creatures than anyone else, than we want take advantage of that. Here's some artifacts you might consider using in your Green Multiplayer deck:
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Mind's Eye: at 5 mana, it can be expensive for some colors, but not for Green. Here's all the card draw you'll ever need.
Akroma's Memorial: expensive, but it sure makes for some tough little saprolings.
Coat of Arms: makes your elves, saprolings, insects, beasts, etc. all bigger.
Bubble Matrix: now Akroma can block Silvos, and Silvos can still trample over for 2. Also protects elves and saprolings from nasty things like a cycled Slive and Dice or a Pyroclasm.
Cold Storage: use to save your creatures.
Erratic Portal: another way to save your creatures.
Lifeline: creates interesting effects.
Loxodon Warhammer: solid equipment for MP.
Masticore: really nice when you have all that mana.
Powder Keg: accurate destruction artifact with a rattlesnake effect.
Slate of Ancestry
Crucible of Worlds: re-use those lands.



5. Splashing other colors
Playing Mono-Green is great fun, but there are only so many things you can do while staying inside Green. In order to accomplish some fancier tricks, cover weaknesses, and explore different options, we have to branch out into other colors. Luckily, Green matches well with any color, because one of the biggest problems with going multicolor is making sure you can produce enough mana of each color to play the spells in your hand. But, what does Green do best? That's right, we accelerate land and mana. So, let's see what each other color can bring to help us.

5a. Red Cards
Green has some similarities with Red, and some differences. They both like to destroy land and artifacts, but Red, unlike Green, has no qualms about blasting the **** out of a creature with fire or lightning. In my opinion, Red doesn't bring a lot to the table that Green can't already do. The real main thing that Red adds to Green is burn spells. However, there are some goodies, so let's look at them:
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Artifact Mutation: kill an artifact and put some saprolings into play, all for 2 mana. Always a good time.
Borborygmos: he's big, he tramples, and he gives gifts to all of your creatures when he gets to smash face.
Burning-Tree Shaman: always a good time.
Decimate: if you've got the targets to make it work, this is a great spell. Just be careful not to **** off too many people.
Feral Animist: an amazing little creature, and he's fun to throw at things.
Fires of Yavimaya: its like a Concordant Crossroads with a rattlesnake pump effect.
Frenzied Tilling: destroy a land to get a land, it's a two way swing.
Giant Trap Door Spider: a spider with a rattlesnake effect .
Hull Breach: multiple effects for one card = good in multiplayer.
Killer Instinct: a little like Sneak Attack. You could easily build around this card.
Radha, Heir to Keld: taps for mana, attacks for mana, what's not to like?
Rumbling Slum: one damage to each player in a multiplayer game can add up real quick. Also acts as a bloodthirst enabler.
Savage Twister: Earthquake and Hurricane had a baby, but left the players out of it.
Shivan Wurm: 5 for a 7/7 trample? Sure. Return my Eternal Witness to my hand? Sure.
Simoon: it's a mini-inferno that only one opponent gets to "enjoy".
Skarrgan Skybreaker: big body with a rattlesnake effect. I like him.
Stonebrow, Krosan Hero: remember when we talked about trample? This guy likes it too.
Wilderness Elemental: he gets real big, real fast
Magus of the Arena: Always fun to throw a poor little utility creature or shadow creature into the arena with a big fattie.
Shattering Spree: strong artifact destruction.


5b. White Cards
White is another of Green's "allies" so to speak. White gives Green some powerful gorilla effects that it lacks, along with some strong creature removal. Let's take a look:
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Ancient Spider: another good spider, this time with first strike.
Armadillo Cloak: Spirit Link on top of some muscle. Never a bad combination.
Aura Mutation: more destruction involving saprolings, this time an enchantment is the target.
Aura Shards: combine this with Verdant Force, Squirrel Nest, or just creatures frequently coming into play, and you'll quickly while the board of all things unnatural.
Autochthon Wurm: he's huge, and he can be convoked.
Congregation at Dawn: pretty solid tutor for creatures. Can combo well with top of library effects.
Gerrard's Command: pretty cool spider effect.
Glare of Subdual: strong control card.
Glittering Wish: amazing wish card!
Juniper Order Ranger: pretty decent growing card.
Mirari's Wake: amazing, amazing, amazing enchantment.
Phantom Nishoba: undercosted beatstick with a Spirit Link effect.
Phytohydra: imagine him with a Lure effect.
Privileged Position: strong board protection.
Selesnya Guildmage: saprolings or pumping, or both!
Simple: gives us a new targeted gorilla effect.
Tolsimir Wolfblood: helps all your creatures, and even gives you a new one.
Wrath of God/Akroma's Vengeance: gives us some new gorilla effects, but you have to be careful, because wiping the board may not be in your best interest unless your deck is built to deal with it.
Armageddon: another gorilla effect. Impact on yourself lessened by Green's mana producing creatures, and you can take advantage of it with Terravore.
Worship: tons of fun.
Swords to Plowshares: one of, if not the best creature removal spell in the game.
Humble: spider effect, and a strong one at that!
Akroma, Angel of Wrath: duh?



5c. Blue Cards
Despite being one of Green's "enemy" colors, Blue fills some interesting gaps for Green. From Blue, we gain counters, strong bounce, and strong library manipulation and draw. Let's look at some multiplayer additions we can garner from Blue:
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6. Synergy and Strategies
Now that we have some basic tools to work with, let's take a look at how we can shape this into a synergistic machine. I will provide a couple examples that take advantage of Green's strengths.

Growth
Green is all about growing, and it is something that is unique to the color. We have the ability to make our land base and mana bases grow faster than others, and we can make our creatures grow faster too. So, let's see what cards we would pull from if we were thinknig about making a deck designed to grow:

Land/Mana Growth
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First, let's look at how we want to grow some land:
There are many strong synergies between cards that search for land, cards that put land into play faster, and cards that benefit from land coming into play. We've already looked at many of these options. However, what are we gonna do when we have all that land out? Sure, we could use it to play a big creature, but what else? Well, there's always the option of attacking with them! But first, you might want to make them a little bigger with some help from this guy and this guy. Suddenly those forests are 6/6 tramplers.

We can also use our lands to gain life, or discard them from our hand to deal damage.

Second, lets look at how we can set up a powerful mana acceleration. My favorite four creatures to use for massive acceleration are: Llanowar Elves, Priest of Titania, Rofellos, Llanowar Emissary, and Quirion Ranger. The synergy here is several fold. First, they are all low cost, meaning you can accelerate and cast spells at the same time. Second, they are all elves, so they all feed into Priest of Titania's power. Third, two of them are massively powerful when you can untap them with Quirion Ranger, and if you haven't played a land that turn, you can get a free mana from replaying the land. This quartet can power out some massive mana in very little turns.

A common way this can play out is this:
1st turn: Forest, tap for , play Llanowar Elves.
2nd turn: Forest, tap both forests for mana, play Priest of Titania, tap Llanowars for mana, play Quirion Ranger.
3rd turn: Forest, (You now have a possible 10 mana available to you on your third turn. Don't see how? Tap your three forests for mana, tap Llanowar Elves for mana, tap Priest of Titania mana, activate Quirion Ranger's ability, returning a forest to your hand and untapping Priest of Titania, who you can then tap for mana again. That, folks, is 10x. I'll leave it up to you as to how you wish to use that mana.)

So, now you can see what Green mana acceleration can look like. It can get even more ridiculous if your third land drop is a Gaea's Cradle. Believe it or not, that type of acceleration is not uncommon by any means. It is actually spectacularly consistent. You could substitute a Rofellos for the Priest, or another Llanowar for the Ranger, and still end up with 8 mana on turn 3.


Creature Size/Number Growth
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Finally, let's look at how Green's creatures can grow out of control. We will first look a singular creature growth, and then later focus on growing tons of little dorks.

One common theme for size growth that works well for multiplayer is growing via +1/+1 counters. What cards might we use (inside Green)?

Forgotten Ancient
Fungal Behemoth
Spike Weaver
Cytoplast Root-Kin
Kavu Predator
Doubling Season

Now, these are just a small number. If you look at the Simic guild from Ravnica (Experiment Kraj, Plaxcaster Frogling, Vigean Hydropon, Simic Guildmage), or any of the bloodthirst creatures (Scab-Clan Mauler, Skarrgan Skybreaker), you can quickly make a very synergistic deck that grows very quickly. How quickly? Well, consider that when you move a +1/+1 counter with Doubling Season out, you add another counter to the creature you're moving it to, which with a little mana and some spells cast can get out of hand in a hurry. Think how likely it is for 5 spells to be cast between each of your upkeeps in a 6-8 person multiplayer, and then consider that moving 5 counters to the same creature with the season would give that creature +10/+10. And, of course, you can use mana and land acceleration to further facilitate growth and speed.

Growing in numbers is another Green specialty, and my personal favorite that I will use as an example, is saprolings!
Yes, these little buggers literally crawl out of the woodwork to ruin your day. There are endless ways to put them into play and make more of them, and they all become doubly numerous with Doubling Season.

Better Elves and Gardens
The obvious favorite saproling king is Verdant Force himself, and his warm, loving embrace. However, other stars in this walking forest of paper cuts are Nemata, Grove Guardian, the hermit, Verdeloth, and the farmer.

I have never been a fan of the fungi. They seem a bit slow, even with their recent bolstering. I would much prefer to put Verdant Force into play with Primal Order on one of my first few turns than wait around for fungi to spore me to death. I've already mentioned it, but Doubling Season deserves another mention. It is a very powerful card for Green.


Simple Combos
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Sometimes the best synergy is that between 2-3 cards. It's simple, it's to the point, and its not too hard to get into play. I'll go over some basic 2 and 3 card combos that you may want to consider in your deck:

2-card combos
Scouting Trek + Clear the Land: always a fun combo. Remember when I mentioned you could have up to 8 or more mana on turn 3 with your mana acceleration. Well, if you don't wanna scare the table too fast with laying down a huge trampler, you could always use 5 of that mana to pull this off and lay out 5 additional lands. Chances are you'll help some other people at the table too, so there shouldn't be any ill will towards you.
Stampeding Wildebeests + Wall of Blossoms/Spike Weaver/Eternal Witness/(enter "comes into play" or "leaves play" creature here): a classic combo. Allows you to turn the wildebeest's upkeep into a benefitial ability.
Oath of Druids + Gaea's Blessing: originally a 1v1 combo, but with a little effort you could adapt it to multiplayer.
Doubling Season + anything that puts a token or counter into play: absolutely fantastic!
Squirrel Nest + Earthcraft: if you use this in your group, don't tell them I gave you the idea. It is a rather cheap (and I don't mean the cost) combo, but it does work.
Nacatl War-Pride + sacrificing: this guy gives you a lot of free tokens that go away at the end of the turn...unless you send them to their graves sooner.
Quirion Ranger + creature with powerful tap ability: obvious combo, but worth mentioning.
Lure effect + Basilisk effect: simple. As old as Magic itself.
Seed the Land + Brand: much fun.
Awakening + Copperhoof Vorrac: I think you get the idea.
Kavu Predator + Reverent Silence(alternate cost): this makes me smile every time I think about it.
Crucible of Worlds + Constant Mists: constant fog.
Meloku the Clouded Mirror/Uyo, Silent Prophet + Azusa, Lost but Seeking: fun combo
Spectral Force + Quirion Ranger: money.

3-card combos
Natural Order + Dork = Fattie of your choice : ahhhh, one of my favorites. Four mana is so easy to accelerate to, and once you do, it doesn't hurt to kill your Llanowar Elves to get a Silvos, Rogue Elemental or Verdant Force into play. If you like splashing colors, then you could always search directly for a Autochthon Wurm or Sisters of Stone Death. See the power?
Crucible of Worlds + Armageddon/Death Cloud/Wildfire + Terravore: he's big

There are a ton more, this is just a small sampling.


7. Sample Deck Lists
I've included some decks here from some different players to hopefully give you an idea of what a complete deck looks like for multiplayer. Please note that while you could copy these decks, I'd advise against it. You will get more more pleasure from playing your own creations than from playing the creations of others. Now, if you want to borrow themse, combos, I would applaud that. But, please, take multiplayer as an opportunity for you to be creative.

Cervid's Saproling Farm


SEND ME YOUR DECKS!!!



8. Cards Everyone Should Have
There are some classic Green cards that everyone should have. These aren't high budget, they're not super rare, these are just some solid Green cards. Everyone needs a way to accelerate their land and mana base in a cheap and efficient way, so Llanowar Elves and Kodama's Reach should be your basics. To protect yourself, you'll want cards like Moment's Peace and Spike Weaver. Eternal Witness is another card that everyone should have. It can grab any card in your graveyard when it comes into play, and with all the different ways to return it back to your hand to play again, or sacrifice it and get it back, this is a cornerstone of Green reccursion. Stampeding Wildebeests/Stampeding Serow is another card you should have, because it works so elegantly with "comes into play" abilities! Also, since we're playing Green, make sure you have at least a few quality fatties: Verdant Force, Silvos, Rogue Elemental, Thorn Elemental, etc.

NOT Cards Everyone Should Have
Green, fortunately or unfortunately, is also home to lots of sharing cards. While I, personally, don't recommend using them, I will list them for you. By the way, the reason I don't recommend using them, is because Green already accelerates out faster than any other color, so I don't see why you'd want to use your strengths to play a card that gives everyone super acceleration (except in a deck designed around it). Anyhow, here they are, in all their ridiculous glory:
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Hypergenesis: everyone, everything, on the table.
Liege of the Hollows: when she dies, everyone becomes a squirrel lover.
New Frontiers: everyone gets lots of land.
Oath of Druids: if your deck isn't built around it, this is all kinds of help for other people.
Rites of Flourishing: "play an extra land and draw an extra card...but, ummm, you guys can all go first, I'll wait til my turn comes around again."
Shizuko, Caller of Autumn: free mana for everyone, and it doesn't cause burn!
Upwelling: stupid ridiculousness.
Veteran Explorer: its a 1/1 thats easy to kill and gives everyone a going away present of 2 lands.
Weird Harvest: everyone gets to grab their creatures.
Weird Harvest: "I'll play this decidedly weak creature (compared to what you could play) and let everyone play out their bombs."
Eureka: more ridiculousness.

[rant]Now that we've discovered new ways to help people win, let's talk a bit about why this is stupid. Unless your deck is purposefully built around taking advantage of these cards effects in some way, these are going to hurt you far more than they will help you. Consider this; you're at a 6 player FFA chaos game, and you play Hypergenesis. Now, your goal, your opponent, is 5 other people. Sure, they may help you by beating eachother up a bit, but to win you have to defeat "your opponent" which is 5 other people. When you play Hypergenesis, you are giving massive card advantage to your opponents. This is never a good thing. Rites of Flourishing is worse than playing a Howling Mine. [i]Everyone/[i] at the table benefits from this card before you do (except the extra land you might get to play). Some at the table might even find it humorous to destroy it at the end step leading up to your turn. I know I would, and it would serve you right for playing it if you don't have a way to specifically abuse it. [/rant]

So, use these cards at your own insanity.


9. Multiplayer Theory
Allow me to preface by saying that everyone's multiplayer group is different. You meta might be different, your average skill level of players may be different, the number of players you play with (3 person multi? 8 person multi?), your rules may be different (FFA Chaos? Attack to the left?), etc. For the purposes of this multiplayer theory, I will be assuming four or more players at the table, playing FFA Chaos.

What I know about Multiplayer theory is largely drawn from my own experience in my multiplayer group and articles I've read here or at StarCityGames.com.


For the purposes of this Multiplayer Theory, I'm going to concentrate on politics of multiplayer. If you're not used to multiplayer, then learning politics would be a great way to quickly increase your chances of doing well in a multiplayer game. In dueling, you have one opponent. One person's permanents to destroy, one person to **** off, one person to beat. You draw one card to his one card, your counterspell on his spell creates a 1:1 trade, giving you no net gain or loss in card advantage. However, let's add...2 more people. Now you have 3 opponents, totalling 60 life, who draw 3 cards to your 1, and your counterspell on opponent "A"'s spell gives you a net loss of card advantage, because you and that opponent both lose a card, but the other two players at the table do not. While counterspelling can sometimes be a good idea to protect your interests, you can't use it to stop every threat on the board.

Making Friends/Making Enemies
Coming out too strong: Let's say you have a fabulous hand that, on turn three, nets you 8 mana to play your Living Hive with. You slap that card down, it resolved, you're feeling good about your board. I mean, look at what you have out...everyone else on the board certainly is! The problem you've just created for yourself is that if you're so far ahead of everyone else, guess who the guiltless target is? No one wants you to start swinging and making a bunch of tokens that you could Overrun with next turn and kill 2 people. You are going to be the target, and no one is going to feel like helping you. Except a removal spell to target your fattie before it becomes your turn again.

Targeting something because you can
Let's say you play an Orim's Thunder targeting Player A's Mind's Eye, a good target, and one you probably should get rid of. However, because the kicker is there, you pay an extra and kill Player B's Birds of Paradise. Now, you're improved your card advantage by taking out two targets with one spell. This would be a good play in dueling, but in multiplayer it's a bad move. By targeting B's Birds of Paradiise, an unthreatening creature in the grand scheme of things, you've created ill will towards you. Player B was probably glad to see Mind's Eye bite the dust, but he's not happy that you took out his mana source in the same breath.

A couple things happen here. First, not only do you create an enemy by targeting a non-threat, but Player B may be upset enough by the move, that he counters your Orim's Thunder, saving the Mind's Eye, and creating an ally in Player A. Had you only targeted the artifact, Player B would probably have been pleased with you. He would probably be pleased enough to see it go that he may counter anything Player A does to attempt to prevent its demise. By paying one and targeting his Birds of Paradise you could have very well lost yourself the game. No, I'm not exaggerating.

Using your cards to help another player/Using another players cards to help you
You'd be surprised at how many people don't look at the advantages/disadvantages of using one of your own spells to benefit one of your opponents, or purposefully keeping an opponent around to fill a gap that your deck can't. Sure, we're talking about FFA, but what if Player A has a benefitial spell out that's helping keep you in a good position. I remember being in a game where I was playing my Sunburst/Ion Storm deck, and the only reason I hadn't been killed yet is because another player was severely crippling everyone's creatures, but since I didn't need my creatures to win, it didn't bother me as much. I rode a delicate balance that game of making sure he didn't die (but not helping him so much that he'd win), while setting myself up for a position to kill the other two players that were highly interested in his demise. I ended up winning that game by eliminating the other two players on the same turn, and then finishing off the player who had basically won me the game.

People will be willing to give aid if you help them. You don't have to outright discuss alliances, in fact I'd frown upon such things. However, alliances and enemies set themselves up in every multiplayer game. You know which decks you stand the best chance of beating, and which ones can beat you, but you may know that another player can beat your biggest enemy. You can then set out to help that player in hopes that he will in turn aid you.

Equal and Opposite Reaction
It's true in physics and it's true in multiplayer magic. If you want to be successful at your multiplayer table, contemplate what effect each of your plays is going to have. Are you going to create an enemy? Are you going to create an ally? Are you going to create an enemy and an ally? How do you feel about that? In the end, you're going to end up ******* off someone, so once you have, you might as well continue to **** them off. What I have seen a lot of players do, and I am guilty of this myself, is spreading the hate thin, and hoping no one gets too annoyed. You know what I'm talking about, the guy who attacks Player A, then Player B, then Player C (because he has already hit A and B, and now it's C's turn). Well, while this might seem like you're making less enemies, because you're making an attempt to even out the pain, in the end no one is happy about getting attacked, and if given a choice of where to send their attack first, don't be surprised if it's you because "well, you attacked me already".

Not too hard, not too soft, but just right...
No deck is capable of winning it all in a smart multiplayer group. Players learn to sniff out combos and stop them, and they won't let a freight train build up enough momentum that it can't be stopped. You win multiplayer games by not losing them. That may sound strange, but what it essentially comes down to is you want to ride the fence between a strong board position and a weak one. You don't want to be so weak that you can't defend yourself, but you don't want to be so strong that everyone wants to take some off the top, you want to be...just right. The Goldilocks approach is a strong one. I have seen decks that do nothing but defend with rattlesnake effects out and wait for others to make enemies and forget they are there. They win by letting others kill eachother, and then coming in later to clean up the scraps. I've seen this so often. The guy who gets burned down to 2, then left alone out of pitty who ends up as one of the last two players contending for the win. Is your group guilty of the, "You're still at 20? How?" realization? I know mine still falls for it now and again.

Have fun!
This is the most important aspect of multiplayer, and I'd like to illustrate it by telling a story.

Planar Chaos
On this Tuesday evening of multiplayer, I decided to tear apart my stupid red burn deck (which never wins, but always managed to take a couple people down with it) and rebuild my coin flipping deck. It's the kind of deck that sometimes wins, usually pulls off some interesting things, and is always a lot of fun. So I started out the game with a Krark's Thumb and a Mogg Assassin. I had activated the Mogg a couple times, to no success, but the Mogg was still alive and missin' because its targets' controllers had decided to send the Mogg elsewhere. Fun times. So then I draw a card: Planar Chaos. I had forgotten that these were in the deck, and I chuckled to myself as I played the enchantment and watched it resolve. Initially the response was more akin to "aww, shucks" than a "kill that bastard!" and I sat back to see what would happen. Well, by the time that it was my turn again, Planar Chaos had countered about 6 spells (one of which was an attempt at its life), and caused as many or more laughs. By the time I failed to win the flip on my upkeep (Krark's died after the first paid upkeep) 3 of my turns had passed with successful coin flips to keep Planar Chaos in play, much to the chagrin and humor of the rest of the table. By the way, when I say win, I mean it came up heads. I wanted this thing gone as much as anyone, because pretty much everyone (after seeing the enchantment refuse to die and counters starting to pile up on Chance Encounters) felt that the best way to get rid of it was to get rid of me. I was dying. But Planar Chaos wasn't, nope, it was having a grand old time countering spells left and right (one poor guy had 8 of 9 spells countered by the chaos) even if it was going to be the death of me. By the time I died, it had countered around 20 something spells. Although you'd think that would frustrate people, watching people roll the dice (odd=tails, evens=heads) as they played a spell, hoping that this time it would resolve, and then laughing and cursing as the spell took a one way trip to the graveyard, was actually a good laugh for everyone. I left the game quite pleased, and am thinking of renaming the deck "Soviet Russia" because on that Tuesday, I didn't play Planar Chaos, Planar Chaos played me.

10. Conclusion
Multiplayer is a unique and rewarding way to play magic. I have little interest in playing anything other than some sort of multiplayer, whether its Two-Headed Giant, Emperor, Type 4 ridiculousness, or good old chaos. I think it's as much for the social aspect as it is the uniqueness of every game. In the end, players are the ultimate pigeon. For each person you add to the game, you create more laughs, more interesting scenarios, and more friends. I wouldn't have it any other way.

In closing, I think Kermit says it best when he sings: "It's not that easy being Green."
Reserved again.

This guide is not done. I have reached the limit that the first post will allow. The second half will be up soon.

I would still love to hear any feedback, comments, and suggestions.

If this looks like the same format as Tich's Black Multiplayer Guide, that's because it is. I've talked with him, and he gave me his blessing to use his guide as a template to create mine. You will still, obviously, find the guides very different.
Nice use of font size on GROW. Visual cleverness is helpful.

Guess I should sig this one, just like Tich's.

Squallmonger might be a cockroach, perhaps a rattlesnake, too.

Seal of Strength, Elephant Grass are some more rattlesnakes.

Silverglade Elemental, Skyshroud Claim, and Wood Elves provide land acceleration.

Squallmonger sits under dealing with fliers, too.

Wildsize is a great trample-enabler. I really like that it provides a card, too.

Treetop Village could be under land, could be under trample.

Note that throughout your post, a person could substitute Stampeding Serow for Stampeding Wildebeests.

Green does feature some targetted destruction, in the form of Desert Twister. Land frustration is also a possibility (in conjunction with another color): Creeping Mold, Mwonvuli Acid-Moss, Thermokarst, Winter's Grasp, Ice Storm, Fallow Earth, Plow Under, Thresher Beast, and Ritual of Subdual.

Also, what about the friendly green cards? Veteran Explorer, Hunted Wumpus, Hypergenesis, Eureka, Weird Harvest, New Frontiers, Invigorate, and the like? Green does this well, and so might need this as a separate category.

I'm sure that more will come to me. Time to post and change a sig...
A shout out to Gaming Grounds in Kent, Ohio and Gamers N Geeks in Mobile, Alabama. www.zombiehunters.org for all your preparation needs. http://shtfschool.com/ - why prepping is useful, from one who has been there.
Nice use of font size on GROW. Visual cleverness is helpful.

Guess I should sig this one, just like Tich's.

Squallmonger might be a cockroach, perhaps a rattlesnake, too.

The problem I have with Squallmonger is its ability to be used by anyone at the table.

Seal of Strength, Elephant Grass are some more rattlesnakes.

Seal of Strength is a weak rattlesnake, and I'd rather not take up a spot in a deck that could be used for a combat trick. I will, however, add Elephant Grass.

Silverglade Elemental, Skyshroud Claim, and Wood Elves provide land acceleration.[/c]

Yes, along with a million other green cards. I was trying to give some of the better examples, rather than list every single one.

Wildsize is a great trample-enabler. I really like that it provides a card, too.

I will add this.

Treetop Village could be under land, could be under trample.

Really, Treetop Village is more powerful in 1v1 than it is in multiplayer. As a Green mage, if you want to attack with land, there are far better ways to do it.

Note that throughout your post, a person could substitute Stampeding Serow for Stampeding Wildebeests.

Being that I've played on and off since revised, I'm partial to the older, cooler Wildebeests. I will include that they can be substituted.

Green does feature some targetted destruction, in the form of Desert Twister. Land frustration is also a possibility (in conjunction with another color): Creeping Mold, Mwonvuli Acid-Moss, Thermokarst, Winter's Grasp, Ice Storm, Fallow Earth, Plow Under, Thresher Beast, and Ritual of Subdual.

I am going to add Desert Twister, you just haven't seen the next section to be posted, yet. However, targeted land destruction doesn't really fly in multiplayer, which is why I haven't really talked about it.

Also, what about the friendly green cards? Veteran Explorer, Hunted Wumpus, Hypergenesis, Eureka, Weird Harvest, New Frontiers, Invigorate, and the like? Green does this well, and so might need this as a separate category.

I'm sure that more will come to me. Time to post and change a sig...

If I'm playing Green, then I almost certainly have one of the faster land/mana accelerations at the table. Why would I want to help everyone else get their bombs onto the table? I don't consider those cards to be smart multiplayer moves, which is why I didn't include them.
If I'm playing Green, then I almost certainly have one of the faster land/mana accelerations at the table. Why would I want to help everyone else get their bombs onto the table? I don't consider those cards to be smart multiplayer moves, which is why I didn't include them.

Different strokes for different folks, man.

Maybe an honorable mention as cards that look tempting, but only crazy people (like me) would play...

On an unrelated note, I forgot how fun and campy the original Dawn of the Dead movie is.
A shout out to Gaming Grounds in Kent, Ohio and Gamers N Geeks in Mobile, Alabama. www.zombiehunters.org for all your preparation needs. http://shtfschool.com/ - why prepping is useful, from one who has been there.
I'm currently looking for decklists of proven green multiplayer decks. They don't have to be mono-green, but they should be at least half-green. I am including one of my own, but I'd prefer if the others were born of a different mind.
Cervid - you are most welcome to post any of mine that you like.
A shout out to Gaming Grounds in Kent, Ohio and Gamers N Geeks in Mobile, Alabama. www.zombiehunters.org for all your preparation needs. http://shtfschool.com/ - why prepping is useful, from one who has been there.
No offense, but you list alot of cards that are not really "that" good and overstate the power of green in multiplayer.

Does green suck in multiplayer...no not at all, it is actually very powerful in team formats like 2HG or Emperor. However, in my personal experience, in an FFA (chaos) it is better delegated to a support role.

I do however, encourage you to 1)continue this and 2)voice your thoughts on other colors.
I would have to strongly disagree with you. Just because not all the cards I list are bombs, doesn't mean they aren't good cards. Every card in a deck is not a bomb. You need a supporting cast of cards. I don't think Green is weaker than other colors in multiplayer, in fact I think it's one of the strongest (and I don't think that I'm overstating it at all). If I were asked honestly, under oath, which colors were [i]commonly[/i] the strongest in multiplayer, I would say Black, followed by Green.

As far as "support roles" go, a lot of decks choose to use Green for its land/mana acceleration, because it is extremely strong. However, just because someone decides to use it in a support role doesn't mean that that is how it best serves. Most multiplayer decks are multicolored, because this gives you the ability to cover weaknesses of a certain color. Remember, you're not playing against one person. Someone at the table is going to have an answer to your threat, but you might not have an answer to theirs. However, you can increase your chances of having an answer to more threats when you bump your deck from mono-colored to multi-colored.

A lot of multiplayer cards that are powerful on paper, and in game, turn out to be game losers. Why? Well, I'll cover that in my multiplayer therory, but let's just say that the table might not be too thrilled with you if you come out too strong. That's not to say that Green is good because it can't come out strong, but cards that people sometimes think, "Oh, wow, imagine that when it hits 7 other people!", well imagine when 7 other people hit you back.

Edit: What do you mean by "voice your thoughts on other colors"?
Edit: What do you mean by "voice your thoughts on other colors"?

I imagine he is hoping for guides for Red, White, and Blue; maybe Artifacts.

Those might fall on others to write, though.
A shout out to Gaming Grounds in Kent, Ohio and Gamers N Geeks in Mobile, Alabama. www.zombiehunters.org for all your preparation needs. http://shtfschool.com/ - why prepping is useful, from one who has been there.
I imagine he is hoping for guides for Red, White, and Blue; maybe Artifacts.

Those might fall on others to write, though.

If you had any idea how much time it takes to make these...

Haha. I may, eventually, make another one. But once this is finished, I'm sure I won't be starting another one right away. Not to say that I'm not enjoying making it, but it eats a lot of time.
I do agree with dza76wutang on some card choices. Really, when you take the time to read over your cards, not all of them gain anything from the MP transition. Trample is probably the least worth while form of evasion, I would have rather seen mention of Lone Wolf type evasion.

Sketchy Cards
Seed the Land, this card was built for green mana accel, but when you're suddenly dealing with 3+ snakes for every one you get, it's not quite so worth while. I would rather you mention this alongside Brand in a strategy section. Overall, it is a poor card choice unless you build the deck with it in mind.

Along that trail of thought, Awakening. Yes, if your deck revolves around it, but when you're giving everyone free untaps... you're pushing your luck.

Wrong Classification
Molder Slug, I would be careful how you classify him. He is definitely not Pigeon, he is cockroach, under repeatable.

Kavu Predator, nothing strictly makes him better in MP. He is a combo/hoser card.

No MP Relevance
Roar of the Wurm, Crush of Worms, Ursapine, Giant Solifuge (He is HORRIBLE in MP)
My guide to Black multiplayer cards and strategies: http://community.wizards.com/go/thread/view/75842/18893722?sdb=1&post_num=1#322195706 My guide to Red multiplayer cards and strategies: http://community.wizards.com/go/thread/view/75842/28999213/?sdb=1&post_num=1#517562879 My guide to White multiplayer cards and strategies http://community.wizards.com/go/thread/view/75842/29011349/?sdb=1&pg=last#517773211 My guide to Green multiplayer cards and strategies http://community.wizards.com/go/thread/view/75842/29034323/Tichs_Guide_to_Green_Multiplayer_Cards_and_Strategies
I do agree with dza76wutang on some card choices. Really, when you take the time to read over your cards, not all of them gain anything from the MP transition. Trample is probably the least worth while form of evasion, I would have rather seen mention of Lone Wolf type evasion.

The problem with that type of evasion it it's hard to come by, and the creatures that have it, by and large, are smaller and have less interesting abilities. Trample is still a strong mechanic when you combine it with the different ways Green has of pumping creatures. Creatures with trample also tend to be better costed, bigger, and have better abilities.

Sketchy Cards
Seed the Land, this card was built for green mana accel, but when you're suddenly dealing with 3+ snakes for every one you get, it's not quite so worth while. I would rather you mention this alongside Brand in a strategy section. Overall, it is a poor card choice unless you build the deck with it in mind.

In the section that I'm currently working on that I have not yet posted, I mention the combo with Brand, I may move Seed the Land to a differnet section, but I think it almost goes without saying that you build around this card, and you don't simply just add it.

Along that trail of thought, Awakening. Yes, if your deck revolves around it, but when you're giving everyone free untaps... you're pushing your luck.

I mention this as a combo as well, and perhaps I should move it as well.

Wrong Classification
Molder Slug, I would be careful how you classify him. He is definitely not Pigeon, he is cockroach, under repeatable.

I was looking at it in terms of card advantage, in which case it does get better as you add more people, but I will consider moving him.

Kavu Predator, nothing strictly makes him better in MP. He is a combo/hoser card.

I find him to be much better in MP. First of all, and I mention this in the combo section, when you combine him with Reverent Silence then you start to see how he becomes better in MP. Second, at least in our met, when we sit down for a 6-8 person multi, there's always as least two or three people gaining life in some form or another. There's always someone with an Essence Warden, Clearwater Goblet, Loxodon Warhammer, or something of that nature. But again, he's something you have to build around, at least a little.

No MP Relevance
Roar of the Wurm, Crush of Worms, Ursapine, Giant Solifuge (He is HORRIBLE in MP)

I don't know why I included the Solifuge, I probably had just gotten done reading about Standard. I'll give you that Ursapine isn't the best, but it's not bad either. I could think of several ways to utilize him for MP. As for the two flashback cards, they may not have any pigeon effect, but they live double lives and produce big creatures. Again, not everything here is supposed to be an auto-include, or a stand alone. Few cards are good in every situation. Many need to be either built around or supported, and both of these wurm creators can benefit you in MP.

Perhaps I should list less cards and only stick to the very best, but I'm trying to give people an idea of what is out there.

Edit: Updated with changes to classification of Molder Slug, reminder notices for Seed the Land and Awakening concerning "helping everyone", and completely removed Giant Solifuge.

I am paying now for posting this so I could continue working on it. You're seeing a rough draft. I haven't gone over this multiple times, so forgive me. (I was also working on some of this very early in the morning.)
I'll give you that Ursapine isn't the best, but it's not bad either. I could think of several ways to utilize him for MP.

Your comment made me reread Ursapine, and I realize that I can pump up ANY critter with it, not just mine.

So, for political reasons, I can mess with others' combats or otherwise confound people. Hmmm...
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Your comment made me reread Ursapine, and I realize that I can pump up ANY critter with it, not just mine.

So, for political reasons, I can mess with others' combats or otherwise confound people. Hmmm...

Which is why I like it.

"Hey, Ben, that Akroma, Angel of Wrath getting swords'd? What would it mean to you if you were to gain 12 life instead of 6?"

"Hey, Pete, need one more damage to finish off Tony? Here ya go!"

Good times.
Update: Added the second half of the guide. Will be continuing to edit and revise, as well as accept feedback and suggestions. Thank you.
Nice work

Only 2 problems

Grizzly Fate: 4 creatures from one card if you use buyback, or possibly 8 creatures if you have threshold. Not too shabby.

Doesn't buyback, you mean threshold.

Eternal Witness is another card that everyone should have.

It's still very expensive where I come. getting 4 would costs as much as 4 rares.
It's just that good .

2 Should be enough to combo your graveyard.
Squirrel Nest + Earthbind: if you use this in your group, don't tell them I gave you the idea. It is a rather cheap (and I don't mean the cost) combo, but it does work.

How does this combo work? I'm kind of confused by it. How is bringing enemy fliers to earth and churning out little squirrels a combo?

What exactly am I stupidly missing here?

thanks!
How does this combo work? I'm kind of confused by it. How is bringing enemy fliers to earth and churning out little squirrels a combo?

What exactly am I stupidly missing here?

thanks!

You're not dumb. Its the wrong card. Try Earthcraft instead of Earthbind.
A shout out to Gaming Grounds in Kent, Ohio and Gamers N Geeks in Mobile, Alabama. www.zombiehunters.org for all your preparation needs. http://shtfschool.com/ - why prepping is useful, from one who has been there.
Very good work, Cervid. I can believe that took weeks to write.

I'll add a deck in this post soon.
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Rule that I would change: 204.1b
204.1b Some effects change an object’s card type, supertype, or subtype but specify that the object retains a prior card type, supertype, or subtype. In such cases, all the object’s prior card types, supertypes, and subtypes are retained. This rule applies to effects that use the phrase “in addition to its types” or that state that something is “still a [card type].” Some effects state that an object becomes an “artifact creature”; these effects also allow the object to retain all of its prior card types and subtypes.
"Eight Edition Rules Update" We eventually decided not to change this template, because players are used to “becomes an artifact creature,” and like it much better.
Players were used to Combat on the Stack, but you got rid of that because it was unintuitive. The only phrase needed is "in addition to its types"; the others are misleading and unintuitive.
Instead of Viridian Zealot I would choose Nullmage Advocate or better yet Nullmage Shepherd for repeatable disenchant effects.
You're not dumb. Its the wrong card. Try Earthcraft instead of Earthbind.

Fixed. Stupid cards being so alike in name.

Instead of Viridian Zealot I would choose Nullmage Advocate or better yet Nullmage Shepherd for repeatable disenchant effects.

I prefer the Zealot because he requires less to do his job. The Advocate requires that there be 2 cards in an opponent's graveyard, and that you return them to his/her hand to be played again, and the Shepherd requires that you have 4 creatures in play, which is not a given either. Also, both of the creatures you suggested are threats to the entire artifact-playing board. Sometimes it's not best to threaten to destroy ALL artifacts given enough time. That will frequently draw attacks in your direction from those playing artifacts. On the flip side, the Zealot threatens just one artifact. So people with artifacts are less likely to threaten you, lest you destroy one of their toys.
wow well done this is an excellent thread. is there any chance of a section focused on standard?
Awesome guide! I just finished reading it. I loved the humor and it was filled with tons of info that I could really use and understand. Thank you

Downdraft: repeatedly bring down those fliers to get pounded by your fatties. Akroma looks impressive with all her abilities up in the sky, but if Verdant Force gets his hands on her, she becomes Akroma, Angel of Many Pieces Strewn Throughout the Forest.

Hahaha hilarious
Cervid, kudos on the guide. I don't think that you should dismiss Squallmonger so soon, just because anyone can use him. Squallmonger cannot kill himself, and he helps you and perhaps others control the air, keeping in check red mages dragons, blues flying armies, etc. Squallmonger also combines excellently with Keen Sense, or the extremely powerful Armadillo Cloak. Of course once you try to enchant him, you better be able to protect him.
Think one card well worth mentioning for green tribal decks is Tribal Unity. If you're going to swarm, why swarm with small things? Sure, you could [C]Coat of Arms[/c], but that has several disadvantages, like the heat it draws and that it boosts all tribes, not just yours. It is also an instant, which in a token generating deck, tends to make it superior to Overrun.

Also worth mentioning for the green flyers...the good old cockatrice. Unlike the ground bound versions, it doesn't create the worry of a lure, as the number of ground bound versus flyers typically doesn't make it worth including in the deck for just the cockatrice. Due to this, a lot more likely to be left alone while nicely keeping the flyers away. In short, one of green's best anti-flyer rattlesnakes.

And for the artefacts, Sun Droplet is a great pigeon card that can work as a bit of a rattlesnake as well. Since you can take a counter off every upkeep (not just yours), it is a great way to recover the life you lost. And if you're just going to get the health back anyway, why bother? With more than one, you can turn loss of life into a longterm gain.

Probably one thing that should be added to this guide: the importance of being able to bounce back from mass destruction.

Not needed for every play group, but the bigger the card base of the people you play with, the more people in the game, the more likely you are to see board sweepers like WoG thrown around. For this reason, card draw, recovering things from your graveyard, life gain, or just the ability to quickly build up again are very important.

Equally important, and this relates to the coming out strong bit, is that it doesn't matter when you are strong or even if you are. Certain things will draw a reaction. You play a verdant force, you're asking to have it killed, you play a basilisk, someone may kill you for fear of lure, you play a sliver, you're asking to die and so on. Unless your deck outclasses what everyone else is playing, it is worth keeping that in mind. It is a fine line to walk, short of being threatening, but enough there that attacking you hurts them too much.

That said, I agree on the having fun. One of the perks of Chaos Multi-player is that it tends to be a bit slower, allowing for slower developing decks. So it makes for a great chance to play some crazy stuff, like a red/blue minotaur theme deck.
Hey, nice guide, BTW on the mana acceleration thingy with the quiron elf, add in an Exploration to squeeze out a few more mana...

Anyways, here goes a Green elf deck...

Creatures:

4 Priest of Titiana
4 Heedless One
4 Wellwisher
2 Rofellos, Llanowar Sentinel
2 Ambush Commander
4 Timberwatch Elves
4 Skyshroud Poacher
4 Eternal Witness

Spells:

2 Enshrined Memories
3 Decree of Savagery
3 Biorhythm
3 Rancor
1 Crop Rotation
2 Loxodon Warhammer

Lands:
1 Gaea's Cradle
4 Treetop Village
18 Forest

Enshrined memories is a reset button from wrath effects...

I prefer Decree over overrun because of the instant surprise factor of the decree, and if your in green and can't pay that mana cost your playing green wrong...

Biorhythm is in there for those pesky white life gain, ohh I am at 3000 life, uh no you're at 7, or those Mono-Red Burn it all to the ground decks(usually creatureless)...


Anyways feel free to modify the deck for your playgroups(this works in my playgroup) and don't forget to add Lorwyn(haven't gotten any yet)
I feel that one card in particular was missed when dealing with the "flying" aspect, and that's Spidersilk Armor. Given that it grants the bonus to all of one's dudes, is common, and relatively cheap, it ain't too shabby.

Also... what about creature fetching, something green does rather well? Chord of Calling, Tooth and Nail and Defense of the Heart (which in particular is great in multiplayer, as people will get dudes out) are just a few of these, but it is something that green does.

I'd also agree with Tich, in that the form of evasion done by Lone Wolf, Rhox, Tornado Elemental post-entry, and Thorn Elemental is not to be overlooked, especially in multiplayer.

Other than these few things, kudos.
In your white cards, you have a card called simple? what is that?
Or, as Autocard: Pure // Simple

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I am looking for some suggestions for it, it has been pretty solid for me so far (18-4-0) but I am always down for some suggestions.

Things I have considered using:
Howl of the Night Pack
Akroma's Memorial
Loxodon Warhammer
Crucible of Worlds
Natural Order
Algae Gharial could be added to the pigeon cards list.
I saw kodama's reach being touted as "preferable" mana accel. I don't think it belongs on that list. In my experience over the course of the 10+ years I've been playing harrow is far superior. Same cost but it's an instant and puts both lands into play which is critical if your using it to get secondary colors on the board. The only time it's bad is if it gets countered, but really who blows a counter in MP on an EoT mana accel? I'm not saying reach is bad, but I can't see how one would possibly play it over harrow or even rampant growth. I would play Krosan Tusker before I played kodama's reach. It nets you the same # of cards and it's very difficult to disrupt plus it's more readily recursible.
no mention of titanic ultimatum?
albeit its not solely green, it is green inspired.
One problem I can see with Harrow is the fact that you have to sacrifice a land, not always to best strategy to destroy your power source.
Sometimes sacrifices must be made.
My Trade Thread Control capabilities are in all the colors. The difference is in the way they say no.
Oran-Rief, the Vastwood is a solid land for green decks.

Why isn't Umezawa's Jitte listed under artifacts?

This might be me being biased, but I think Deranged Hermit is good in the fact that it gets your five creatures out of one card.  It certainly makes a difference when you drop it and everybody groans at the army of 1/1's you can chump with (or in my case, end up attacking with..though for me they aren't usually 1/1's).
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I am looking for some suggestions for it, it has been pretty solid for me so far (18-4-0) but I am always down for some suggestions.

Things I have considered using:
Howl of the Night Pack
Akroma's Memorial
Loxodon Warhammer
Crucible of Worlds
Natural Order

Do you find that you have enough mana to reliably cast you 6 and 7 spell creatures? You do have a TON of mana acceleration.

I don't want to give too many suggestions, but I think that Elvish Warrior looks like a weak link to me. Maybe Yavimaya Druid or Yavimaya Dryad? Vexing Shusher? 

How does your deck do against flyers? Flyers are rampant in Multiplayer in my experience and I think you ought to have some anti-flyer tech in there. Defense of the Heart is great. One funny synergy I thought of when I saw your deck was Terastodon. You could kill three troublesome permanents if you had a Defense of the Heart on board and then you could force a Defense of the Heart trigger if there was boardsweeping that kept players from having 3 or more creatures in play.

Finally, I think a card that could be absolutely BONKERS in your deck is Baru, Fist of Krosa. 4/4 for 5 and with all your mana acceleration he'd come down quick. Every single time you put a land into play, not from your hand, but into play, all your green creatures get +1/+1 and trample. If you get multiples you just pitch him from your hand and get a big fat Wurm into play or you can sandbag and keep him in your hand, thinking that people will get rid of him. I think he'd be ACES in your deck.

Oh, and if you have natural order...
SMOKE 'EM IF YOU GOT EM. They're good, I heard.

From recent blocks
Chameleon Colossus, might not have because of the price
Cloudthresher, for the flyer problem.