The Dictionary Deck-O-Pedia

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The Dictionary Deck-O-Pedia
This thread is designed as an easy, quick-reference guide to decks from all formats - online and paper, casual and competitive. Many of these entries simply provide a brief overview/history of the deck, a sample decklist or two, variants (where applicable), and sometimes basic matchup information. If you're looking for a more in-depth primer, please check to see if there are any links at the end of the mini-primer. These are not intended to be full, in-depth primers (though some of the entries go more in-depth than others).


First and Foremost: This thread is *NOT* a "Post your decklists here" thread. The DDOP is designed as an informative reference for successful, tournament-caliber, famous, or popular decks. I don't mean to sound harsh, but this isn't where you go to post the "Cool Sliver Deck" you play in your casual group or the deck you win with at your local FNM.


There are a few more guidelines that I would like to go through:
1. Please sign up to do one or more primers by posting in the thread, or by sending me a Private Message. This way, we can avoid having people do individual primers of the same deck... in the event that multiple primers of the same deck are recieved, I will either consolidate them into one primer, or I will take the more descriptive/accurate primer.
2. If you wish to submit a primer to a deck, send the primer to me in a Private Message. Even though I'll be linking to each decktype from the Index Post, I'd rather not have the thread unneccessarily long due to duplicate versions (sumbissions plus final versions) of each primer.
3. Please, for the love of all things holy (or all things unholy, if you prefer), USE AUTOCARD. I have neither the time nor the patience to edit each primer as it is sent to me. If you can take the time to do a decent primer on the deck, you can take the time to stick [card] tags on the decklists.
4. Updated 8-31-2006 -- Deck tag guidelines included: I would appreciate it if you could try to use the following format:
Show
Deckname
By (Insert YourName Here)


The Basics:



Other Notes, Matchup Info, etc.:

Relevant Links:
I'm really trying to get these formats standardized; I plan on going back and reformatting the older primeres to suit this format (as best as possible), and I'd rather not do additional mundane work that could easily have been averted.




Without further ado, I present to you the Dictionary Deck-O-Pedia.
**Unlinked decks either do not have primers, or are included in a more general primer (such as BBS in Mono Blue Control)**
**Decks such as "The Clock" are listed in the T section**
**Decks defined by colors will be listed according to the text abbreviation for the lead color. (UG Aggro, for example, is listed under U.)**

Index of Deck Types:
[size=4]#[/size]
12-Post (see Tooth and Nail)
4-Color-Control/4cC (see Keeper)
5/3 (see also Workshop Aggro)
7/10 Split

[size=4]A[/size]
Academy
Affinity (See also
Aggro Loam (see also Broodstar Affinity)
The CAL)
Aluren
Angry Hermit (and with Cephalid Breakfast)
Angry Tradewind Survival (ATS)
Ankh Sligh (see also Sligh)
Assault/Routes
Astral Slide

[size=4]B[/size]
Balance
Balancing 'Tings
Battle of Wits
Beacon Green
Beasts
Belcher (X-Land Belcher)
Big Red
Blue Bull **** (BBS) (see Mono-Blue Control)
Blue Skies
Boros Deck Wins (BDW)
Broodstar Affinity

[size=4]C[/size]
Cephalid Breakfast
Cerebral Assassin
Channelball
Cogs / Cog Control / Salvager Combo
Control Slaver
CounterBurn
CounterMesa
Counterpost
Counter Sliver
CoW Pox
Clerics
Crab Cannon (aka Crab Study)
Crystal Witness

[size=4]D[/size]
Deadguy Ale
Death Cloud
Death Long (see Long.dec)
Desire / TwiddleDesire
Domain
Doomsday
Draco Explosion
Dragon
Dragonstorm
Draw/Go (see Mono-Blue Control)
Dredge-A-Tog
Dump Truck

[size=4]E[/size]
Easter Tendrils (Eggs)
ElfBall
Elf and Nail
Elves (Aggro)
Enchantress
Eon Blue Apocalypse (EBA)
Ernhamgeddon

[size=4]F[/size]
Fires (of Yavimaya)
Fish
Fluctuator
Food Chain Goblins
Forbidian (see Mono-Blue Control)
Freshmaker
Friggorid
Full English Breakfast

[size=4]G[/size]
Ghazi-Glare
Ghost Husk
Gifts Rock
Gifts Ungiven
Goblin Bidding
Goblin Sligh
Gobvantage
Good Form
Gro (See Super Gro, Miracle Gro)
Gro-A-Tog (GAT)

[size=4]H[/size]
Hand in Hand
Heartbeat Combo
Heezy Street
High Tide
Hulk Smash

I
Izzetron

K
Keeper
Kobold Clamp
Krark-Clan Ironworks (KCI, Ironworks)

[size=4]L[/size]
Landstill
Legion Land Loss
Life (Loop)
Long.dec (Burning Desire)

[size=4]M[/size]
Machine Head
Madness
Magnivore
Manabelcher (see The Clock)
March/Obliterate
MartyrTron (see http://boards1.wizards.com/showpost.php?p=10971505]ProclaMartyr[/url])
MaskNought
Merfolk
MesaCraft
Mill
MiracleGro
Miss America (See also Star-Spangled Slaughter)
Mono-Black Control (MBC)
Mono-Blue Control (MUC)
Mono-Green Aggro (MGA)

[size=4]N[/size]
Necro
Neo-Academy
Ninja
Ninja Erayo
No Stick (see Scepter Chant

[size=4]O[/size]
Oath
Obliterate (see March)
Opposition

[size=4]P[/size]
Parfait
Pebbles (Fruity, Cocoa)
Pirates
Ponza
Pox
ProclaMartyr
ProsBloom
Proteus Belcher (See also Proteus Colossus below)
Proteus Colossus (See also Proteus Belcher above)
Psychatog

[size=4]R[/size]
R/G Beatz
R/G Tempo

Ravager Affinity
Reanimation Machine (see also Teen Titans)
Reanimator
Rebels
Recurring Survival (Rec-Sur)
Red Deck Wins (RDW)
Replenish
Rising Waters

[size=4]S[/size]
Samurai
San Diego Zoo
Scepter Chant (No Stick)
ScepterTog
Scryb & Force
Sea Stompy
Secret Force
Shrines
Sleight Knight (see White Weenie)
Slide/Rift
Sligh
Slivers
Snakes
Sneak Attack
Snow White (see ProclaMartyr)
Solar Flare
Solar Pox
SoilCraft
Solidarity
SpiritCraft
SquirrelCraft
Star Spangled Slaughter
Stasis
Stax
Step in Time
Stompy
Suicide Black
Sunrise

[size=4]T[/size]
Teen Titans
Terravore
The CAL (see also Aggro Loam)
The Clock
The Deck (see Keeper)
The Rock
Threshold
Tight Sight
Tinker
Tools and Tubbies (TnT)
Tooth and Nail
TPS (The Perfect Storm)
Trinity Green
Trix
Turboland
Twiddle Desire (see Desire)

[size=4]U[/size]
UG Aggro
U/W Control (See also CounterMesa and Counterpost)

[size=4]V[/size]
Vial Goblins
Vise Age
Void (see Suicide Black)
Vore (see Magnivore)

[size=4]W[/size]
Wake
White Weenie
White(red) Weenie (WW/r)
Wildfires
Workshop Aggro
Worse Than Fish (WTF) (see Fish)
Worship

[size=4]Z[/size]
Zombies
Zoo

If you're looking for more in-depth primers or information more specific to tournament formats, go here:
T2 (Standard) FAQ
T1 (Vintage) FAQ
T1.5 (Legacy) FAQ
Extended FAQ

If you want updated archetype/meta info from Magic Online formats specifically, try Frank Karsten's "Online Tech Deck-O-Pedia."
Channelball
By Skankhair

The Basics:
Channelball is a combo deck from Magic's earliest days. Originally, you could use any number of copies of a card in your deck, and there was no deck minimum.
It won on turn 1. This made people cry.
Then Magic stopped having moronic rules (or rather, a lack of rules to keep the game from being moronic). The 4-of rule was created and the deck minimum became 40 cards (later raised to 60). But the Channel/Fireball combo still randomly won games, causing Channel to be banned from tournament play.

The Decklist:


Other Notes, Matchup Info, etc.:
Channelball was never really a good deck after the 4-card rule and 40-card minimum came about, but it was still infamous, and it still made people mad. To this day, people think of Channelball when they think of turn 1 wins, even though the deck is a horrible example of a turn 1 win. People often refer to Type 1 as the format in which Channel + Fireball exists, even though the combo isn't viable in Type 1 at all, and wouldn't be even if the deck was allowed to run 4 Channel and 4 Black Lotus.
Channelball may be a crappy deck using today's rules, but it remains an example of why we have the deckbuilding rules that we have.

Relevant Links:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Combo_deck (see Channelball)
Desire and TwiddleDesire
By Zerg0nator and Skankhair

The Basics: Desire is a combo deck based around Minds Desire. It's playable in extended and used to be playable in T2. In type 1, desire was restricted even before it came out, but the type 1 version has enough brokeness to go straight for the kill - Tendrils of Agony without building up to a preliminary desire.

The ideal play for a type 2 version of desire would result in a turn 2 kill, which may sound amazing, and it was amazing once in a blue moon, but overall the deck was terribly inconsistent and got stomped by anything faster than it. Even control decks, weak as they were during Mirrodin-Onslaught type 2 could easily deal with desire by countering a crucial piece of the combo. Plus, there's always the sideboarded Stifle that wrecks the deck in one shot.

Desire (Extended) and TwiddleDesire (old Extended, old T2) decks both try to play several spells in one turn thanks to untappers (cards than untap lands after you play them like Snap in Desire, or cards like Twiddle and Dreams Grip in Twiddle Desire) to fuel a Minds Desire with a decent Storm count. Then, you use use Mind's Desire to play a bunch more spells for free to get up to a Storm of 9 to play a lethal Tendrils of Agony.

TwiddleDesire was popular in Extended for a while, but Extended Desire decks no longer use Twiddle and Dream's Grip.


The Decklists:
Doomsday
By PipOC

The Basics:
Back in the day there was a combo deck called Doomsday, and it was powerful enough to go and get its bad self restricted. It was based around playing Doomsday with two cards in hand, and getting a stack of the following:
Timetwister
Regrowth
Black Lotus
Lion's Eye Diamond
Stroke of Genius
Of course, you had to have two cards in hand, or the combo wouldn't work.
To get the combo up and running, you play Doomsday, getting the aforementioned stack. You must have two cards in hand and 3 mana to do so. Pass the turn and draw into Timetwister. Play it, leaving it as the only card left in your graveyard, and then play Black Lotus and Lion's Eye Diamond. Break (sacrifice) the Black Lotus to play Regrowth, and in response to the Regrowth, break Lion's Eye Diamond for blue mana. Timetwister comes back into your hand and you have 4 mana, 3 with which to play the Timetwister, and 1 left over. Keep repeating this loop until you have enough mana to kill your opponent.

The Decklist:



Other Notes, Matchup Info, etc.:
After the bannings, nothing was to be heard of Doomsday for years.
Along comes September of 2004. The B/R announcement comes with a mild shock; Doomsday is to be unrestricted, effective the 20th. Many teams begin working on breaking Doomsday again. Many focus on the Helm of Awakening/Ancestral Recall/Conjurers Bauble/Disciple of the Vault combo. But, like many times before, Team Meandeck plans to break the mold. Early in october their stack is leaked:
Ancestral Recall
Black Lotus
Dark Ritual
Mind's Desire
Beacon of Destruction
For this combo, play Doomsday and pass the turn if you have [MANACOST]UB[/MANACOST] (UB). Play Ancestral Recall into Black Lotus, Dark Ritual, and Mind's Desire, and then play Dark Ritual and Black Lotus to play Mind's Desire with a Storm count of 4. 1 Mind's Desire resolves revealing Beacon of Destruction, and then you play Beacon of Destruction, dealing 5 damage to your opponent, and shuffling it back in to be revealed by Mind's Desire 3 more times.
Up to this point, the team had been planning to play the deck at SCG's Power Nine II, but since the stack had been leaked, only Steve Menendian played the deck. He went to top 8. Many people thought the deck would replace TPS, but because of the deck's fragility, it hasn't been used as often as expected..

Smmenen's deck also included another kill that didn't require passing the turn to the opponent and exposing itself to a possible topdeck answer. If you have a draw a spell in hand or a Chromatic Sphere in play and you have enough mana to do it, you can use this stack (if you are using Gush, replace Ancestral Recall with Brainstorm):
Ancestral Recall
Black Lotus
Lion's Eye Diamond
Yawgmoth's Will
Tendrils of Agony
Play the draw spell, play Ancestral Recall, play Black Lotus, and Lion's Eye Diamond]LED. Play Yawgmoth's Will and crack (sacrifice) LED in response. Play Black Lotus and LED, then replay the draw spell you used and play Tendrils of Agony for the kill.
If you used Gush, play Gush and Brainstorm, putting the two Islands on top of your library. Play Black Lotus and LED, play Yawgmoth's Will and in responce break LED, replay LED and Black Lotus, and then play Tendrils of Agony for the win.
Gobvantage
By Skankhair

The Basics:
Originally designed by Tooru Maegawa before Scourge came out, Gobvantage is based on the Goblin Recruiter/Goblin Ringleader draw engine, along with Goblin Matron to help fetch the Goblin Recruiter and Goblin Lackey to power out the massive amounts of Goblins that are drawn. At the time, the deck didn't quite work so well. But once Goblin Warchief, and Siege-Gang Commander were printed, the deck took off. A Japanese team called Fireball Pro updated the deck with the new Goblins and took Extended by storm.
The deck's power in Extended and T1.5 caused Goblin Lackey and Goblin Recruiter to be banned in Extended and later Goblin Recruiter to be banned in T1.5. The deck was especially problematic once Goblin Charbelcher was printed, as it has obvious synergy with the Goblin Recruiter. “Seething Gobvantage” was a variant that used Seething Song and was popular in T1.5 before Goblin Recruiter was banned.

The Decklist:


Other Notes, Matchup Info, etc.:
Gobvantage is similar to Food Chain Goblins (See Food Chain Goblins), and is sort of the precursor to that deck. Gobvantage and FCG shared play in Extended and T1.5 before the bannings took them both out. In Type 1, however, Gobvantage is pretty much strictly inferior to Food Chain Goblins, and is now just a deck for casual players who like to relive history, or cannot afford the mana fixing and acceleration required to properly run FCG.

Relevant Links:
http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=sideboard/worlds03/extgob
http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=mtgcom/daily/bd133
http://boards1.wizards.com/showpost.php?p=5213000
Machine Head
By Skankhair

The Basics:
Machine Head is a Black/Red Aggro/control deck which Tom van de Logt drove to a first place finish in the Type 2 World Championship of 2001.
The deck uses early control then drops large beatdown creatures, often with the help of Dark Ritual. This allows it to slow faster decks down, and then start playing bigger creatures than the other deck can handle.
This archtype never saw much play in other formats but remains a fan favorite of players who played T2 during its era.

The Decklist:


Relevant Links:
http://www.wizards.com/sideboard/article.asp?x=Worlds2001\450finals
Ninja
By fluor

The Basics:
Generally, a ninja deck, no matter if it is blue, black, or blue and black, will use cheap creatures, which are used to Ninjutsu out the ninjas, who all have abilities that trigger when they deal combat damage to a player. Therefore, the cheap creatures used often have evasion, like flying (blue) or fear (black). Since they will go in and out of play often, creatures with “comes into play” abilities are often used.
Examples of cheap, evasive creatures include: Sage Owl, Ravenous Rats, Nezumi Cutthroat, Spiketail Hatchling, Teardrop Kami, and Thalakos Seer.
Of course, Ornithopter has to be mentioned. Its casting cost of zero means that it is free to cast after a Ninjutsu, which may have eaten all your mana. Plus, it even has evasion! Late game, when you have Higure, the Still Wind, Ornithopter is usually a dead card, however.
After you gotten some ninjas out and gained/are gaining card/board advantage (midgame), one of the Lords (Ink-Eyes, Servant of Oni or Higure, the Still Wind) will aid you, and with Higure, the Still Wind making your ninjas unblockable, you therefore gain better/more card/board advantage (also because he fetches more ninjas to swarm with).
Support cards for the ninjas vary, but most often they will be creature kill or counterspells to protect your ninjas.

The Decklist:


Other Notes, Matchup Info, etc.:
Ninja decks are generally acknowledged as weak. The main reason for this is that they are weenie decks, but are unable to swarm before the mid/late game, which is too late. What the deck tries to do is also very mana-consuming, so you cannot always do everything you want to do in a turn.
If ninjas were to ever be competitive, it would likely be in block. It is possible to replace Ornithopter with Nezumi Cutthroat, and the Sage Owl with Soratami Cloudskater or Teardrop Kami.

Relevant Links:
http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=mtgcom/daily/jm94 (and previous articles in the series)
http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=mtgcom/daily/mf27
http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=mtgcom/daily/mg161
Replenish
By Skankhair

The Basics:
Replenish uses cards like Frantic Search, Careful Study, and Attunement to draw and discard a lot of cards, then Replenish to put all of the discarded Enchantments into play at the same time.
The deck was popular in Urza's Block Constructed and in T2. When Masques came out, T2 Replenish picked up some neat tools in Parallax Wave and Parallax Tide.
The classic win came from Opalescence, then using your army of Enchantments to attack for the win (controlling the board with the Parallax cards and stalling with Energy Field). Later (in other formats) Pandemonium/Saproling Burst (Pandeburst) became the standard kill.

The Decklist:


Relevant Links:
http://www.wizards.com/magic/expert/wcd2000/wcd2000_pcd_logt.asp
Samurai
By Zerg0nator

The Basics: Samurai is variant of the classic White Weenie archetype that focuses on Samurai creature type from Kamigawa block. It's mostly for flavour reasons, but samurai also have some tribal synergy. If you're looking to play competitive magic, an unconstrained white weenie deck would be more practical, but nonetheless Samurai enjoy a great popularity among casual players.

Since samurai are a creature type specific to Kamigawa block (and it's quite likely to stay that way) a Samurai deck is most competitive when opponents are restricted to Kamigawa block as well. Despite the fact that Samurai are also present in black, red, green and even blue, the decks built around them tend to be mono-white.

For more information on how the deck should play, check the White Weenie description.

Here's a sample of a mono-white samurai deck, legal in Kamigawa Block. Other colors can easily be splashed by adding 4x Kentaro, the Smiling Cat and a few lands of the appropriate colors (just to make sure)

The Decklist:
Sunrise
By Nichelmn

I feel like doing Sunrise. Because I haven't testing Legacy sufficiently, I'll just do Extended.

Sunrise is a deck relying on using the card Second Sunrise to recur Eggs (Skycloud Egg and co, Conjurer`s Bauble, Chromatic Sphere, etc, in order to draw a large number of cards, plus sacrificial mana sources like Crystal Vein and Archaelogical Dig to gain the mana required to keep going. The first two turns or so are spent playing Eggs and lands, until you feel you are able to "go off". After burning through all your permanents, you play Sunrise to get them all back, sacrifice them all again, drawing into another Sunrise and more Eggs and mana sources in the process. Hence, the amount grows each time and you get closer to a "critical mass", where you able to draw up every card in your library and win with whatever you method of choice is.

A list:

Eggs
4 Conjurer`s Bauble
4 Chromatic Sphere
4 Sungrass Egg
4 Skycloud Egg
4 Darkwater Egg
4 Mossfire Egg

Sunrises

4 Mystical Tutor
4 Second Sunrise

Extra Mana

4 Crop Rotation
3 Summer Bloom

Land

4 Crystal Vein
4 Archaelogical Dig
4 City of Traitors
3 Cephalid Coliseum
2 Windswept Heath
3 Plains
1 Forest

Possible SB:

4 Disciple of the Vault
3 Aether Spellbomb
3 Scrabbling Claws
3 Xantid Swarm
1 Barbarian Ring
1 Disenchant

Turn 3 kills are quite common, in fact probably the most common turn you'll go off (the second being not at all, or extremely late game).

A more in-depth look at the deck:
Show
A sample game (Pulled out of MWS, writing down as I play)

Opening hand:

Crystal Vein x 2
Archaelogical Dig
Chromatic Sphere x 2
Mossfire Egg
Plains

Turn 1: Play Vein, tap for Chromatic Sphere.

Turn 2: Draw Chromatic Sphere. Play the other Vein. Tap both to play a Mossfire and Chromatic Sphere. Now, at this point you could have possibly gone off, by sac'ing both Veins and hoping desperately to draw into Sunrise in the next two cards. While possible, it's not worth the risk. You really need to have a Sunrise in hand and something like Crop Rotation before attemping a turn 2 kill.

Turn 3: Draw Crystal Vein (!) (That is not particularly representive). Play it. Tap, sacrifice Vein for 2. Sacrifice the Chromatic Sphere for a white mana. You now have 1W floating. You draw: Forest.
Now you've got no white Eggs in hand currently, so you're probably best just using the other Chromatic Sphere for a white mana. Sacrifice it, you now have WW floating. You draw: Mystical Tutor.

Hmm, this means you're assured of being able to fetch a Sunrise. You need to use that Sphere in hand to get a blue mana, tutor, then use another Egg. Unfortunately at this point Mossfire Egg would run you out of white mana, so you hope that the next card you draw will be an Egg or something that can ensure you don't fizzle. A lot of these situations will occur while playing, but the topdeck gods will often pursue. In this case I could have avoided the situation by getting rid of my Mossfire earlier, making this all easier. Thus, you need to be careful when choosing what to sacrifice, as you could end up pointlessly losing due to a color-fixing problem. The scenario is two white mana, two other mana and a Darkwater or Mossfire in hand. Sometimes this may just stop you from drawing before you play a Sunrise, sometimes you may not be able to play a Sunrise at all.

So, sacrifice a Crystal Vein, play Chromatic Sphere, activate for blue. You draw: Second Sunrise. Even better! The worries didn't pan out after all. It now looks very good for you. You have WWU floating and a Crystal Vein ready to be sac'ed with a Mossfire in hand. Since you've got your Sunrise, you don't need to worry about losing your blue. Sacrifice the Vein, play the Mossfire Egg and sacrifice it. You now have WWRG in your mana pool. You draw: Sungrass Egg. Excellent. Another Egg. This makes maximum use of your mana, leaving you with just enough mana for Sunrise. Beware: If you fear Daze/Force Spike, you may be better off playing Sunrise now.
In this case for simplicity's sake, we'll assume nothing of the sort. You play your Sungrass Egg and activate it, leaving you with WWG. You draw: Archaelogical Dig.

Now you're ready to play Sunrise for the first time! Emptying your mana pool, you recur three Crystal Veins, three Chromatic Spheres, a Mossfire Egg and a Sungrass Egg. Plus, you have assured access to another Sunrise in hand, so you're feeling comfortable. Six colorless mana at least and five cards to be drawn, you should make the next Sunrise better.
Sacrifice Crystal Vein, sacrifice Mossfire Egg: You draw: City of Traitors. Not very good now, but that's what Summer Bloom is good for. Note it was best to sacrifice the Mossfire Egg first as red mana is least useful, and it'll allow to spend it on activation costs.
No point losing that green mana when you still have colorless, sacrifice another Vein, and a Sungrass Egg. You draw: Crop Rotation.

Crop Rotation isn't so good with these Veins, they can already sacrifice themselves. For this reason, it may be better to wait a little longer to see what to do. You may draw a Summer Bloom and be able to sacrifice one of the lands drawn from it. You could get rid of it now and play your last Vein in the deck. For all we know, it's the top card of the library and you may lose that chance should you draw. For now, I'd risk it and wait until there's nothing else to do, so you can decide if you want something like Cephalid Coliseum to get rid of these lands drawn, or need more mana.

Sacrifice a Chromatic Sphere to get our second white mana, using the red that is floating. You draw: Mystical Tutor.
Now, at this point, you have access to at least two more Sunrises. You *could* use one of them to get a Summer Bloom, playing many lands but I'd prefer to stay in the comfort zone.

Well it looks like you're going to need a blue mana. You currently only need one green, so let's pay one green and sacrifice our Chromatic Sphere to add U and draw a card. Note we could Crop Rotation now, but I'd prefer to keep my options open. If a Summer Bloom is drawn, you could use the green mana to play a land from hand that will generate G, then play Crop Rotation with that. Drawn: City of Traitors. Hmm. We'd rather have an Egg at this point, oh well.

At this point we'd like to be able to get a Cephalid Coliseum with Crop Rotation, but we're just one mana short. So we'll just Crop Rotate into the last Crystal Vein in the deck. Tap 1 from Crystal Vein. Pay G, sacrifice it, get Crystal Vein. Sacrifice Crystal Vein. Play Mystical Tutor, getting Second Sunrise. Sacrifice your Chromatic Sphere, adding U, draw it. You have 2WWU in the your mana pool. Play Sunrise, leaving 1U remaining. You haven't succeeded in getting any more drawing sources down, but you have gotten more mana.

Sacrifice Crystal Vein, Mossfire Egg, Draw: Mossfire Egg. Good. Another Egg. You have 8 mana available, so if you just draw into three more Eggs in this cycle, you could tutor for Sunrise and have nine cards to draw in the next cycle.

Spend 1R, Sacrifice Sungrass Egg, Draw: Conjurer's Bauble. Too bad we couldn't have one of these earlier. Perhaps the most important "Egg" in the deck, it puts a card (usually a Sunrise or Mystical) beneath your library, and comes back each time. Whenever you use a shuffling effect like a tutor or fetchland, the deck shuffles and you now have a higher chance of drawing into a Sunrise. So with a couple of early Baubles, you deck size may shrink but the number of Sunrises and tutors will not, making it very easy to go off in those stages. Once your library is entirely depleted, it allows you to go infinite by putting a Sunrise beneath your library, drawing it, and then having the Sunrise recur the Bauble itself. Each time you do this, all your mana sources (which need to including a few Archaelogical Digs, but Bloom gets them in) will come back also, as well as Cephalid Coliseum. You target them with Coliseum, causing them to draw 3 cards, then discard 3. Do this until their library is depleted and you win. This means you don't need to take up any space at all for a win condition, as Coliseum is useful anyway.

Sacrifice Crystal Vein, sacrifice Chromatic Sphere for W, Draw: Conjurer's Bauble. Excellent. A second one, just what you're looking for.
Sacrifice Crystal Vein, play and sacrifice Mossfire Egg: Normally you'll want to get rid of your other Eggs, but we want to lose this red mana, so we'll get rid of it now. Draw: Darkwater Egg.
Hmm, it doesn't really matter at this point, sacrifice a Chromatic Sphere for U, spending R. Draw: City of Traitors.
Play and sacrifice Darkwater Egg, sacrificing Crystal Vein and spending U: Draw: Mossfire Egg.
For reasons outlined above: Play and sacrifice Mossfire Egg, spending BGG. Draw: Skycloud Egg.

Seven mana available, and three Eggs in hand. May as well use them all but one and Mystical for a Sunrise. We want a shuffle so let's not leave a Bauble as last. Sacrifice Chromatic Sphere, spending R and adding G, drawing: Crop Rotation. Hmm, if you'd known this you might not have sacrificed all the lands. Nevermind, all the Veins are gone anyway and it's probably better to just use all the Eggs.

Play Conjurer's Bauble (spend G), sacrifice, put Second Sunrise under library. Draw: Darkwater Egg.
Play Conjurer's Bauble (spend U), sacrifice, put Second Sunrise under library.
Draw: Conjurer's Bauble. Maybe it was better to leave Chromatic Sphere to sacrifice... anyway.

Play Mystical Tutor, getting Sunrise. If it wasn't for the Baubles, this would have left just 1 last Sunrise in the deck, but now there's still three.
Play Conjurer's Bauble, putting Mystical Tutor beneath the library. Draw into Sunrise. Now THAT'S a good amount of Eggs to recur. 11. (Five from previously, two from leftover mana, four from the mana we had that wasn't spent on Sunrise. Plus four Crystal Veins! We don't have the comfort zone of a Sunrise in hand, but it seems likely we'll get one.

Sacrifice Conjurer's Bauble to put a Sunrise beneath. Draw: Sungrass Egg. Do the same with another Bauble for the Mystical. The deck now has all the Sunrises and tutors back in it. Draw: Archaelogical Dig. It's best to hold onto the Crop Rotation, in case a Summer Bloom is drawn.
Sacrifice Vein, sacrifice Mossfire: Draw Skycloud.
Ditto: Draw plains.
Ditto: Draw Summer Bloom. Ah, now that's great. We could play a couple of City of Traitors and another land for a huge mana boost this cycle and next. We'll see what happens in the next few though...
Spend RR to sac Sungrass Egg: Draw Windswept Heath.
Spend RG: Darkwater Egg, drawing Sungrass Egg.

Maybe we should shuffle up that Mystical and Sunrise that were at the bottom. Summer Bloom, City of Traitors. Tap. Another City of Traitors. Tap. Another City of Traitors. Tap. This mana will be well used, considering all the Eggs in our hand. Time to choose a Crop Rotation target. Cephalid Coliseum will allow for some good digging, plus it'll show its uses for example purposes, so I'll think that'll be the target, though a Dig would certainly be handy.

Now for some Egg burning. Spend 1, Sphere, add W, draw Mystical. Yup, almost impossible to lose now. May as well get this over and done with. Spend 3, play and activate Darkwater. Draw Conjurer's Bauble. Sac a Sphere spending 1 and adding G, draw Coliseum. Ditto, draw a Sunrise. Sacrifice Crystal Vein, Skycloud Egg, drawing into Crop Rotation. OK it's pretty clear now, I'll save time. Sac your Bauble, cycle through seven Eggs (coincidently it ends up being exactly how many you're able to). Now, your library contains just 13 cards and you have more Eggs that that, so you have a 100% chance of going off now. Cycle through Eggs until you get to a Summer Bloom (two in this case), play it, getting three Archaelogical Digs from your hand into play. Draw draw draw... until you have a deck of exactly 0 cards. (Drawing more is er, bad).

Sacrifice Conjurer's Bauble, put Second Sunrise beneath your library, which also draws it. Tap, sacrifice Coliseum: Target player draws thre cards. Play Sunrise. Rinse, repeat. You (finally) win!

The Opponent:

Oh yeah, you've got an opponent too. Well, except for a small subset of cards, most of it shouldn't bother you. The stuff that does is the SB.

Barbarian Ring/Disenchant: Well, you've got Crop Rotation and Mystical Tutor which can get these. Barbarian Ring deals with Disciple of the Vault, Meddling Mage, etc. Also it represents another way to win should decking them not be an option (they might draw something you don't like?). However, by the time the opponent is drawing cards with Coliseum, you should be able to set it up that anything they draw will not have any consequence, as with multiple Baubles you can ensure you have another Sunrise in hand to go off in response to anything (like an Orim's Chant they randomly drew). Maybe 3 Serra Avatars...
Disenchant can get rid of problems like Rule of Law, Isochron Scepter.
Either could be MD'ed if you expect the problem to be bad.

Xantid Swarm: Countermagic hurts. This stops it for this turn and other turns as well, you can sometimes use it to allow you to start going off in one turn and finish in another turn if necessary. Plus it can come down early enough to evade countermagic.

Disciple of the Vault: Generic solution. If an opponent has a ton of hate for any particular thing, this can ensure they can't just s**** it off. Originally planned for MD but cut due to colour problems, you could have all your Sunrises extracted or Meddling Maged but still be able to randomly ping them to death. Plus any of their artifacts hitting the grave also pings them.

Scrabbling Claws: Can still cycle like an Egg (but 1 mana), but provides random answers to things like Reanimator or any deck that wants to Eternal Witness something or any use of the graveyard. A major thing it does is make sure anything like Seal of Fire, that are randomly recurred by your Sunrise, do not come back to kill you. Nomad Stadium is a tutorable answer.

Aether Spellbomb: The same targets as Barbarian Ring, plus being a sort of Egg or maybe a staller against aggro decks.

Vampiric Tutor?: A maindeck option for the sole purpose that it can fetch an answer in the form of anything, be it Aether Spellbomb, Disenchant, Disciple of the Vault, or a land, as well as being able to get Sunrise as normal. The question is whether you consider the cost of 2 life and a not so friendly colour to be worth this. Dependant on the threats you expect.

In the Game:

Have faith in the deck (as long as you can run it well). It can survive a lot more than you think it would, especially if you decide to have some tutorable answers MD. A Meltdown/Deed with no way to draw any cards in response may seem like death to you, but I've won games after it. The same with fizzling, you might think it's over (and if beforehand you suspect a high chance of fizzling, play more conservatively so you won't be left with absolutely nothing). But recovery is surprisingly quick, quite often the opposing deck will not be able to win in the window you left them and two turns later you've randomly won. Likewise they might have a large amount of countermagic and you don't a single way of dealing with it currently, but don't assume your opponent is flawless. Someone tapped out eot for Fact or Fiction, thinking it's safe. I go off in response (Crop Rotation is handy being an instant). It never resolved because they lost before it could. Playing conservatively when that's all you need to do wins games against slower decks, because you have the time to always have Sunrise mana open, building up everything over turns. And an opponent who might have everything they need to defeat you will not because they don't know what to do.

The Issue of Storm

Why not run Storm win conditions? I loathe them because you will draw them instead of a card that has a use, like another Egg, and that will randomly lose you more games than you will win by being able to play them. A nice trick though if you do insist is to cycle all your tutors, as much as you can, to add a few to the storm count. If you do wish to use one, I suggest Brain Freeze. It's less mana intensive, is instant speed (for going off in response to something, or in their turn when they may have already played several spells) and can mill yourself, so as to allow you to immediately go infinite soon after.
Trix
By PipOC

Trix is an obscene combo deck that first appeared soon after the release of Urza's Legacy, it is based around Donating an illusions of grandeur to it's opponent, they eventually run out of mana to pay for the illusions forcing them to sacrifice it and lose 20 life. The first trix decks played necropotence to draw up to 19 cards to find all their combo pieces and often cast them in a single turn.

4x Necropotence
4x Illusions of Grandeur
4x Donate
4x Force of Will
4x Duress
4x Demonic Consultation
4x Vampiric Tutor
4x Brainstorm
2x Firestorm
1x Seal of Cleansing
4x Mox Diamond
2x Gemstone Mine
4x Underground Sea
2x Underground River
1x Island
12x Swamps

Sideboard:
4x Phyrexian Negator
4x Pyroblast
1x Firestorm
3x Perish
3x Seal of Cleansing

Necro and demonic consultation were eventually banned from extended forcing players to rethink the strategy. The prevailing strategy was mono-blue trix. It used accelleration such as thawing glaciers, and sapphire medallion to cheapen all it's spells, and drawing alot of cards with accumulated knowledge, merchant scroll, and intuition or just using intuition to tutor for a combo piece with one ion hand and just winnning outright.

14 Island
1 Mountain
3 Shivan Reef
4 Volcanic Island

4 Accumulated Knowledge
1 Brainstorm
1 Capsize
4 Counterspell
4 Donate
1 Fact or Fiction
4 Fire/Ice
4 Force of Will
4 Illusions of Grandeur
2 Intuition
4 Merchant Scroll
4 Sapphire Medallion
1 Thwart

Eventually extended rotated, and illusions was no longer in the format. But trix didn't rest, it was the dominant combo deck in type 1 up until the release of Judgement with Worldgorger Dragon, and Cabal Therapy, and brand new sacrifice engine for Academy Rector, a card that is visciously powerful when combined with yawgmoths bargain, that could also fetch illusions.

3 Underground Sea
3 Tundra
2 Flooded Strand
2 Polluted Delta
2 Island
1 Plains
1 Swamp
1 Vampiric Tutor
3 Illusions of Granduer
4 Force of Will
4 Mana Leak
1 Mystical Tutor
4 Cabal Therapy
4 Brainstorm
4 Dark Ritual
1 Mana Crypt
1 Echoing Truth
1 Mana Vault
1 Necropotence
1 Yawgmoths Bargain
1 Mox Pearl
4 Academy Rector
1 Mox Sapphire
1 Sol Ring
2 Donate
1 Demonic Tutor
1 Yawgmoths Will
1 Black Lotus
1 Mox Ruby
1 Mox Jet
1 Mox Emerald
1 Ancestral Recall
1 Time Walk

Sideboard
1 Darksteel Colossus
4 Disenchant
2 Tormods Crypt
1 Tinker
1 Balance
4 Duress
2 Blue Elemental Blast
White Weenie
By Skankhair

White Weenie is one of Magic's most classic and long-living archtypes. It's been around almost since the beginning and there seems to be a constant supply of WW creatures and no end to the attempts at remaking WW in each set. Because of this, WW's creaturebase can be vastly different from set to set. White Weenie's golden age was around 1998.

White Weenie likes to use 1 and 2 cc creatures that are effective for their cost. Classic examples are Savannah Lions, White Knight, and Soltari Priest. More modern examples are Samurai of the Pale Curtain, and Isamaru, Hound of Konda.

Along with the cheap, effective creatures, WW tends to run some creature removal, and often some sort of board control. These often include Swords to Plowshares, Armageddon, and/or Cataclysm.

Pump is also common and usually comes in the form of Crusade, Glorious Anthem, Empyrial Armor, and/or Army of Allah.

White Weenie Equip (WWE) is a new variant which uses Equipment like Bonesplitter along with creatures that benefit from being equipped such as Auriok Steelshaper, and Auriok Glaivemaster.

Here's a somewhat typical WW deck:

18 Plains
2 Kjeldoran Outpost

4 Savannah Lions
4 Samurai of the Pale Curtain
2 Isamaru, Hound of Konda
4 Soltari Priest
4 Silver Knight
4 Suntail Hawk
4 Leonin Skyhunter

4 Crusade
2 Armageddon
4 Swords to Plowshares
4 Land Tax

The synergy between Land Tax, Empyrial Armor, and creature with evasion (especially ones with Shadow) is a common strategy.

Some WW decks splash other colors. Blue is a common splash for disruption (counters), draw, and often Meddling Mage.

Sleight Knight is another WW variant that splashes Blue for cards like Sleight of Mind, and Mind Bend. This allows your protection creatures (such as White Knight, and Soltari Priest) to get protection from the most important color of the opponent's deck. Circle of Protection cards and color hate like Karma are also common.

Relevant Links:
http://boards1.wizards.com/showpost.php?p=5212966
Academy
By Zerg0nator

The Basics: So you think Affinity was bad? Well, then you haven't played during Tempest/Saga Type 2, also known as "brokeness galore!" time. Not even emergency-banning of Memory Jar softened the impact. Urza's block was the only time in history of Magic (aside from Mind's Desire being restricted in Type 1 before it came out) when DCI had to make an announcement off-schedule to save the game.

This deck combines fast artifact mana, which produces MORE mana thanks to Academy, card drawing and Mind over Matter to untap Academy and make lots and lots of mana... and then some more mana. It wasn't Uncommon to get the combo going turn one and end the game with a lethal Stroke of Genius before an opponent got to play his first Land. This is what people mean when they say games were decided by a coin flip.

In short, Academy is considered the most broken deck in history. (Well, one of them. Many Storm combo decks are far superior to any Academy deck. Academy is infamous, but it's far from being the most broken deck ever- Skankhair)

Here's a sample decklist of an Extended (at the time) version of Academy, which isn't that much different from the Type 2 version.

The Decklist:



Matchups, Other Notes, etc.: After a brief dominance, Academy was killed much like Affinity recently and evolved into Neo Academy, which was played in Type 1 for a short time, but now is considered nonviable.

Relevant Links:
Neo-Academy
Assault/Routes
By darkartist

Basic Info: It's a combo deck that works around Seismic Assault and Trade Routes. Some folks utilize counter/burn, others take a more blue route, and the most successful take on this deck works as a mostly mono-red control deck with just a blue splash for the Trade Routes.

The Decklist:

Matchups, Other Notes, etc.: The deck works by controlling the board early with Shocks, Electrostatic Bolts, and Magma Jets, and then dropping an Seismic Assault and either comboing out (scoop all your land, discard for massive damage to the dome), or finishing with Arc-Slogger (much like Big Red). Genju of the Spires can sneak in for 6 damage sometimes and helps out immensely. Some people run Crucible of Worlds which can be cool too, but I've found I'd rather have more burn in the spots it would take up.
Balance
By PipOC

Basic Info: The scourge of many a new player, the word Balance can still make even the pros cringe. Early in magics history, vintage was dominated by a monstrous creation. The Balance deck. Wrath of God, Mind Twist, Armageddon. All of them are awesome effects by themselves, but rolled into one, they're insane. Balance can destroy aggro, or control just by shifting your playstyle. The deck has no permanent creatures so it always acts as a one sided wrath of god. It has alot of removal, so it can deal with Aggro no problem, and has enough disruption to beat Control.

The Decklist:

Matchups, Other Notes, etc.: Balance was a powerful deck back in the Golden age of Magic, but is not longer viable, nor possible, due to the restriction of Balance in Type 1 and it being banned in all other formats, so it remains simply a really powerful casual deck.
Big Red
By Skankhair

Basic Info: Big Red is a mono-Red control deck that uses burn and board sweepers to kill opposing creatures, then drops a fatty win condition.

The Decklist: Onslaught/Mirrodin Type 2



Relevant Links:
http://boards1.wizards.com/showpost.php?p=5213098
Broodstar Affinity
By Zerg0nator

Basic Info: Broodstar affinity, later also known as "Sarnia Affinity" (Named after a town in Ontario, Canada) had its brief moment in the sun from the release of Mirrodin, when people instantly recognized the power of the affinity mechanic, up to release of Darksteel, when Arcbound Ravager and Skull Clamp broke T2.

However, before ravager, affinity ranged from aggro-control with lots of threats and few counterspells, to straight-up control affinity with only 4 Broodstar and 4 Myr Enforcer. There were also versions with Lodestore Myr and red-heavy builds with Atog and Shrapnel Blast.

Depending on the particular build, Broodstar affinity could put up some early pressure with Frogmite and Myr Enforcers, or simply sit there on Pyrite Spellbomb and Assert Authorityc, slowing down the opponent until it could drop a very big broodstar, equip it with Lightning Greaves and end the game in one or two hits.

Perhaps one last worthy point is that pre-bannings affinity was considered public enemy number one. The insane speed and consistency of ravager warped the format and even caused people to play type 2. Broodstar, on the other hand, was well-balanced deck and some players hoped that the March 2005 Banned and Restricted announcement would bring it back. Unfortunately, DCI killed the Broodstar by axing the artifact lands before it could have a second shot at the tournament scene.

The Decklist:
Cogs a.k.a. Salvager.dec
By Zerg0nator

Based around Auriok Salvagers, this deck recycles various 1-casting cost artifacts, also known as cogs. This might sound rather innocent, but once the deck gets rolling, it can be surprisingly dangerous. The problem is, of course, that salvager deck relies very heavily on one vulnerable creature - you guessed it - the salvagers!

I must say that I'm very much a fan of this deck and had a put one together as soon as Fifth Dawn hit the stores. Unfortunately, cog control never became a popular deck. Sure, it had a better matchup against the almighty Arcbound Ravager than most (running Dsciple of the Vault and often Leonin Elder as well) but nigh-exclusive reliance on salvagers simply made it too vulnerable. Even running countermagic and Lightning Greaves didn't help much. With the release of Kamigawa Cranial Extraction (and Eradicate) only made things worse.

To top it off, cog control lost artifact lands and DotV recently.

The deck commonly starts off by fetching/recycling cogs and attacking with the early creatures. Sooner or later the battle on the ground swings in the opponent's favour, but by then the salvager should be down and tossing eveything your Trinket Mages fetched at opponent's army or his face.


Here's my original build of the deck:

CREATURES
4 Auriok Salvagers
4 Trinket Mage
3 Leonin Squire
4 Disciple of The Vault

SPELLS
2 Serum Visions
4 Condescend
4 Lightning Greaves

COGS
3 Conjurers Bauble
2 Aether Spellbomb
1 Pyrite Spellbomb
1 Sunbeam Spellbomb
1 Necrogen Spellbomb
1 Wayfarers Bauble
1 Chimeric Coils
1 Leonin Bola

LAND
2 Ancient Den
9 Plains
2 Seat of the Synod
7 Island
1 Great Furnace
1 Vault of Whispers
1 Swamp
1 Mountain


And here's a T1 version of the deck, which still uses the salvager, but wins in a completely different manner. This deck tries to recycle black lotus or lions eye diamond for infinite mana (each time you bring it back you have one left over) and then throws the pyrite spellbomb at the opponents face 10 times.

COMBO
4 Auriok Salvagers
1 Pyrite Spellbomb
1 Lion's Eye Diamond
1 Black Lotus

SPELLS
4 Force of Will
4 Duress
4 Disrupt
4 Intuition
3 Chain of Vapor
1 Time Walk
1 Regrowth
1 Doomsday
1 Necropotence
1 Yawgmoth's Will
1 Balance
1 Ancestral Recall
3 Conjurers Bauble

MANA
4 Dark Ritual
1 Sol Ring
1 Mox Sapphire
1 Mox Jet
1 Mox Ruby
1 Mox Emerald
1 Mox Pearl
1 Mana Crypt
1 Mana Vault
4 Gemstone Mine
4 City of Brass
4 Undiscovered Paradise
Control Slaver
By PipOC

Control Slaver was a deck that first appeared in late 2003 after the release of mirrodin. It is based upon the obscenely broken interaction between Goblin Welder and Mindslaver. It can achieve hard locks by using two goblin welders, a Pentavus and a mindslaver, or by getting a Crucible of Worlds, a Darksteel Citadel, a goblin welder and a mindslaver. It controls the game with hardcounters such as Mana Drain and Force of Will, and draws cards with Thirst for Knowledge, Intuition, Accumulated Knowledge, Brainstorm, Skeletal Scrying or some combination thereof. It wins the game with artifact fatties such as Platinum Angel, Pentavus, Triskelion or Sundering Titan, but many games are won before any of those come down by activating mindslaver one or several times, or sometimes by removing an opponent's win conditions with Jester[s Cap.


LANDS:
4 Polluted Delta
1 Flooded Strand
4 Volcanic Island
3 Underground Sea
2 Darksteel Citadel
3 Island
1 Tolarian Academy

CREATURES:
4 Goblin Welder
1 Pentavus
1 Sundering Titan
1 Platinum Angel

OTHER SPELLS:
4 Mana Drain
4 Force of Will
4 Brainstorm
4 Thirst for Knowledge
1 Ancestral Recall
1 Time Walk
1 Tinker
1 Mystical Tutor
1 Fact or Fiction
2 Duress
1 Demonic Tutor
1 Yawgmoth[s Will
2 Mindslaver
1 Black Lotus
1 Sol Ring
1 Mana Crypt
1 Mox Sapphire
1 Mox Ruby
1 Mox Emerald
1 Mox Jet
1 Mox Pearl
Cow Pox
By PipOC
A truncated version of Worldslayer's primer

Pox. We all remember it. For , everybody takes a hit, and a big one at that. With a single card, it would reduce all three major resources on both sides of the field, far outpacing traditional single-point control. It is as close to an unrestricted Balance as modern players are going to get. Well now you can relive the glory days. Pox is back with a brand new little buddy, Crucible of Worlds. CoW Pox, works by denying the opponent completely of at least one resource, be it creatures, cards, land or life. It initially disrupts the opponent with cards like duress and cabal therapy. It uses mana denial such as wasteland, strip mine and null rod, then in the midgame it poxes, hitting each resource, it can achieve hard locks with strip mine completely preventing an opponent from doing anything. Eventually it beats the opponent down with mishras factory or combos out by building up an insane amount of black mana and playing yawgmoths will to recur numerous dark rituals culminating in a gigantic consume spirit or death cloud for the win.

5 Swamp
4 Wasteland
1 Strip Mine
2 Lake of the Dead
4 Scrubland
3 Polluted Delta
4 Mishra's Factory

1 Nether Spirit

4 Crucible of Worlds
4 Duress
4 Dark Ritual
2 Death Cloud
1 Yawgmoth's Will
1 Demonic Tutor
1 Mox Jet
1 Black Lotus
3 Pox
1 Vampiric Tutor
1 Balance
1 Consume Spirit
2 Cabal Therapy
1 Entomb
2 Swords to Plowshares
2 Vindicate
1 Mox Pearl
2 Chains of Mephistopheles
2 Seal of Cleansing

Sideboard
2 Swords to Plowshares
2 Seal of Cleansing
4 Diabolic Edict
3 Gate to Phyrexia
4 Null Rod
Crystal Witness
By fluor

Crystal Witness, or UG-control as it is better known as now, started out as a Mirrodin Block Constructed deck. It used Crystal Shard to replay mainly Eternal Witness (for “infinite” spells), Viridian Shaman (for “infinite” artifact destruction) and Solemn Simulacrum (for “infinite” lands). Some builds even used Triskelion. With all the lands, the deck often won with Rude Awakening (or just plain 2/x beats).
This deck was first played by Matteo Cirigliano on a MD5 block constructed. His list looked like this:

12 Forest
12 Island
4 Solemn Simulacrum
4 Viridian Shaman
4 Eternal Witness
2 Triskelion
3 Annul
4 Oxidize
4 Thirst for Knowledge
4 Echoing Truth
4 Condescend
3 Crystal Shard

Sideboard
4 Troll Ascetic
4 Last Word
1 Annul
2 Duplicant
4 Tel-Jilad Justice

Pre-COK in Standard, people were afraid of splash damage from artifact destruction, and cut the Shard and Triskelion. Then, many also cut Jens, because they wanted to be able to counter on turn 4. Because of the wider meta of type2, Annuls were also cut from the main deck.

But then Champions of Kamigawa came! And UG-control gained many new toys: Sakura-Tribe Elder, Meloku, Keiga and Gifts Ungiven (which is really good with Witness). More counters were run, and it looked more like a control deck.

So, in March, the bannings came, and people started running artifacts again. Of course, very few type2 tournaments have been held, so we know little of the meta. If we look at the Paris Regionals, MUC had sort of taken over UG’s role.
Anyways, today in Standard, there’s three versions of UG-Control.

Plain control
Example courtesy of LUDA215369
// Lands
11 [CHK] Forest (2)
9 [CHK] Island (3)
1 [CHK] Minamo, School at Waters Edge
1 [CHK] Okina, Temple to the Grandfathers

// Creatures
1 [CHK] Kodama of the North Tree
3 [MR] Troll Ascetic
1 [CHK] Keiga, the Tide Star
1 [CHK] Meloku the Clouded Mirror
4 [CHK] Sakura-Tribe Elder
4 [FD] Eternal Witness
4 [8E] Birds of Paradise

// Spells
4 [8E] Mana Leak
4 [CHK] Hinder
3 [DS] Echoing Truth
3 [8E] Plow Under
1 [FD] Rude Awakening
4 [CHK] Gifts Ungiven
1 [8E] Bribery

Aggro control
Lands
10 Island
11 Forest
1 Okina, Temple to the Grandfathers

Creatures
4 Troll Ascetic
2 Meloku
4 Eternal Witness
3 Ninja of the Deep Hours
4 Birds of Paradise

Spells
3 Echoing Truth
3 Vedalken Shackles
3 Condescend
4 Mana Leak
4 Sword of Fire and Ice
2 Rude Awakening
2 Plow Under

Shard control
Example courtesy of Ageless Entity:
Lands
12 Forest
1 Minamo, School at Waters Edge
1 Okina, Temple to the Grandfathers
9 Island

Creatures
4 Solemn Simulacrum
4 Eternal Witness
2 Meloku the Clouded Mirror
4 Sakura-Tribe Elder

Spells
3 Condescend
3 Gifts Ungiven
2 Rude Awakening
3 Echoing Truth
4 Hinder
3 Mana Leak
2 Plow Under
3 Crystal Shard
Dragon
By PipOC

Dragon, or d4gron as it's called by many, first appeared after the release of Judgement. The combo is the result of an unforseen rules interaction between Worldgorger Dragon, and animation enchantments(Animate Dead, Dance of the Dead, and Necromancy). The dragon comes into play from the graveyard, it's triggered ability goes on the stack and resolves, removing all other permanents you control from play, the enchantment is no longer in play so it triggers an ability forcing the dragon to go to the graveyard. Since the dragon is in the graveyard it's second ability goes on the stack bringing back all your permanents...UNTAPPED. This way you can create infinite mana to channel through one of many win conditions, which are found through use of Intuition, Bazaar of Baghdad, Compulsion or Buried Alive. There are several ways to kill, creating infinite mana and channeling it through a spell such as Ghitu Fire or Stroke of Genius, but this way was only used for a short while before discovering a much better way of winning, by putting a creature that you can channel infinite mana into in your graveyard you could put that into play when the dragon was sent to the graveyard and channel your mana into it, these creatures are Ambassador Laquatus, Shivan Hellkite and Sliver Queen. There are two other good ways of killing your opponent, by animating Eternal Witness then regrowing an animation spell to bring the dragon back and start the loop again, the dragon removes the witness once every loop allowing you to bring an infinite number of cards back from your graveyard, the preferred card is Ancestral Recall, you recur it a number of times forcing your opponent to deck themselves. You can also use Caller of the Claw since your dragon has gone to the graveyard an infinite number of times in your turn you create an infinite number of bear tokens. The disruption used by dragon is based on the colors it uses. The 5-color and green versions use Xantid Swarm while the blue based versions use Force of Will, all of the versions use Duress.

Sample Decklist
LANDS:
1 Bloodstained Mire
1 Island
4 Polluted Delta
1 Swamp
4 Underground Sea
2 Volcanic Island
4 Bazaar of Baghdad

CREATURES:
1 Kumano, Master Yamabushi
4 Squee, Goblin Nabob
3 Worldgorger Dragon
1 Ambassador Laquatus

OTHER SPELLS:
1 Black Lotus
1 Crucible of Worlds
1 Mana Crypt
1 Mox Jet
1 Mox Ruby
1 Mox Sapphire
1 Sol Ring
3 Animate Dead
1 Demonic Tutor
3 Duress
1 Entomb
2 Necromancy
1 Vampiric Tutor
1 Ancestral Recall
3 Careful Study
3 Deep Analysis
4 Force of Will
2 Intuition
3 Stifle
1 Time Walk



Sideboard
1 Echoing Truth
1 Engineered Explosive
3 Pyrostatic Pillar
2 Rack and Ruin
1 Rebuild
3 Red Elemental Blast
1 Sundering Titan
2 Tormod's Crypt
1 Verdant Force
Fires (of Yavimaya)
By Skankhair

Fires is a traditionally R/G deck that uses cheap mana acceleration (usually Llanowar Elves and Birds of Paradise) to drop a quick Fires of Yavimaya, then start laying down fat, well-costed beaters such as Jade Leech and Blastoderm. Saproling Burst is another common finisher. The deck also ran some control (in the form of burn and mana denial) to slow down other decks if it got a slow draw. These control cards often included Rishadan Port, Fire/Ice, and Urzas Rage.

Fires was a very popular T2 deck during the 2000/2001 season. It has been tried in other formats with only so-so results.

A common variant is Dark Fires that splashes Black for Spiritmonger.

Alex Shvartsman Fires 2001

3 Brushland
8 Forest
4 Karplusan Forest
4 Mountain
4 Rishadan Port

4 Birds of Paradise
4 Blastoderm
2 Flametongue Kavu
2 Kavu Chameleon
4 Llanowar Elves
2 Shivan Wurm
2 Yavimaya Barbarian

4 Chimeric Idol
2 Fire/Ice
3 Fires of Yavimaya
4 Saproling Burst
4 Urzas Rage

SB:
3 Aura Mutation
1 Boil
1 Brushland
2 Fire/Ice
1 Flametongue Kavu
2 Kavu Chameleon
3 Pure Reflection
1 Rith, the Awakener
1 Yavimaya Barbarian



Jan Tomcani Dark Fires 2001

8 Forest
3 Mountain
2 City of Brass
2 Llanowar Wastes
2 Sulfurous Springs
3 Karplusan Forest
4 Rishadan Port

4 Llanowar Elves
4 Birds of Paradise
4 Blastoderm
4 Thornscape Battlemage
2 Spiritmonger
2 Flametongue Kavu
2 Kavu Chameleon

4 Fires of Yavimaya
4 Saproling Burst
4 Fire/Ice
2 Urzas Rage

SB:
3 Blood Oath
3 Boil
2 Obliterate
3 Thunderscape Battlemage
2 Kavu Chameleon
2 Tangle
Fluctuator
By Dokai

[CARD]Fluctuator[/CARD] was a powerful card back in Urza block, particularly for its ability to thin out your deck by cycling through for free. It also comboed with cards such as [CARD]living death[/CARD] and [CARD]haunting misery[/CARD]. It was so powerful that it was banned in Urza block

With the release of the onslaught block it gained access to more beefy cyclers, though it wasn't considered a viable deck

Here is an extended legal fluctuator deck:

// Mana Base (21)
4 Swamp
2 Mountain
4 Blasted Landscape
2 Polluted Mire
2 Smoldering Crater
4 Bloodstained Mire
3 Chrome Mox

// Cyclers (24)
4 Primoc Escapee
4 Sandbar Serpent
4 Barkhide Mauler
4 Pendrell Drake
2 Keeneye Aven
2 Undead Gladiator
4 Drifting Djinn

// Combo Fixer (7)
4 Vampiric Tutor
3 Cabal Therapy

// Combo Pieces (8)
2 Fluctuator
2 Living Death
2 Cabal Ritual
2 Anger

// Sideboard
SB: 1 Living Death
SB: 1 Cabal Therapy
SB: 3 Slice and Dice
SB: 3 Boseiju, Who Shelters All
SB: 4 Withered Wretch
SB: 3 Lightning Rift

This deck is a combo deck at heart. Unlike other combo decks, its combo helps find other combo pieces, with cycling. Fluctuator to put them in your graveyard, Living death to get them all out, Anger to give them haste. The only tough part is getting anger in the graveyard. It can be Cabal therapyed after a living death, or it can be discarded then used as flashback bait for [CARD]cabal therapy[/CARD]

An important note to keep in mind is that cycling does not give card advantage, though it does empty your deck.
Goblin Bidding
By Skankhair

Goblin Bidding is basically a Goblin deck that splashes Black mainly for Patriarchs Bidding. This gives the speedy archtype a good mid-game play. Goblins tend to attack, attack, attack. In this process, they'll lose a few creature to blockers. Bidding allows the Goblin player to attack without fear and simply get back all of his or her lost creature. It also allows you to make the best use of Goblins that require saccing, such as Skirk Prospector.

Goblin Bidding was brought to the world by Wolfgang Eder in 2002 and 2003. He used the deck to top 8 at Worlds in 2003, and the archtype continued to see play in 2004 when Onslaught/Mirrodin was the T2 environment. It is not the basis for Black/Red Goblin decks in Extended, though those decks have a wider pool of tricks to call on.

Wolfgang Eder, Worlds 2003, 7th Place

Land (22):
10 Mountain
4 Swamp
4 Bloodstained Mire
3 Shadowblood Ridge
1 City of Brass

Creatures (32):
4 Goblin Piledriver
4 Goblin Sledder
4 Goblin Warchief
4 Siege-Gang Commander
4 Sparksmith
3 Skirk Prospector
3 Goblin Taskmaster
3 Gempalm Incinerator
2 Goblin Sharpshooter
1 Goblin Grappler

Other Spells (6):
3 Patriarchs Bidding
3 Smother

Sideboard (15):
2 Cabal Therapy
2 Dark Banishing
1 Smother
4 Starstorm
4 Sulfuric Vortex
2 Flaring Pain

Relevant Links:

http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=mtgcom/daily/bd133
High Tide
By: Reprint Black Loutus... please?

The deck known as "High Tide" is a combo-based deck that revolves around getting "infinite" mana and/or a large storm count for the win.

The combo:
1)The combo require you to have 6 islands in play and cast High Tide.
2)Tap your five remaining islands for 10 mana.
3)Cast Palinchron with 7 of those floating mana. When Paly comes in play you get to untap all six of your lands. Do so. You now have 3 mana floating
4)Tap all six islands for 12 mana. That plus the 3 earlier = 15 mana.
5)Use 4 of those floating mana to return palinchron to your hand.
6)You now have 11 blue mana in your mana pool. Cast Palinchron, since Palinchron costs 7, you have 4 floating. And all your islands untap, now tap all your islands again for 12 mana. You're up to 16 mana.

***-4 mana to return Palinchron to your hand, -7 mana to cast, +12 mana when you tap all your islands = 1 extra each time you do this.

The only exception is the first time you go through the cycle you get 3 floating, then every time after you get +1 ***
---You are now aquiring more mana than you can spend. Repeat steps 2 - 6 by casting and returing Palinchron to your hand.---

Winning:
1)With all of this mana you are getting you can use Braingeyser or Stroke of Genius to force your opponent to draw their entire library for the win.

2)Every time you cast Palinchron you are getting a storm count. You can do the combo many times, use the built up floating mana to continue your combo (cast and recast Palinchron) without tapping your lands to deplete your excess mana and cast Brain Freeze on your opponent for the win.

3)Don't forget that Palinchron is still a 4/5 flyer! You can always play BBS-style and just attack five times for the win.

Playing the deck:
Stay alive for at least six turns. That's the name of the game when playing this deck. That is what the counterspells are for. Always keep as much mana untapped as you can during your turns and counter anything worthwhile your opponent casts. If your opponent doesn't do anything on their turn, cast either Brainstorm, Impulse, Mystical Tutor, or even Stroke of Genius at the end of their turn to help look for combo pieces. As soon as you have all the necessary components for the combo, go for the kill and enjoy one of the funnest combo decks around.

1.5 Decklist:
Land:
23x Islands

Search/Counter:
4x Force Spike
4x Counterspell
4x Force of Will
4x Brainstorm
3x Impulse
2x Merchant Scroll
2x Mystical Tutor

Combo:
4x High Tide
4x Brain Freeze
4x Palinchron
1x Stroke of Genius
1x Braingeyser

Alternative card choices:
Whispers of the Muse: If you have six islands, high tide, and a Palinchron, but no kill card, you can cast whispers of the muse and keep buying it back to look through your entire library for the win card of your choice.

Cunning Wish: You can put some of these in the place of some of your kill cards. This can provide you with more room for counters or search, but it will also hinder your sideboard slightly.

Conclusion:
The deck is a little slow for any high-level tournament, but it's a good old deck. It's more of a "fun deck" but is still capable of doing very well in a tournament depending on your meta. For all of you multiplayer-free-for-all players out there, this is a deck can that can take out all of your opponents at one time and doesn't fizzle out like some other combo decks. As for the price tag of this deck, it is very cheap to make. If you really need, you can substitute another counterspell card for Force of Will - Mana Leak or Miscalculation are options here.
Krark-Clan Ironworks (KCI, Ironworks)
By Mirri

The Basics: Ironworks decks sprung up with the release of fifth dawn and the cornerstone card of the decks, Krark-Clan Ironworks. Ironworks decks come in various types with various names but each one features two common elements. Artifact lands and KCI.

The idea of the decks was to drop a number of artifacts and feed them to the KCI create large amounts of mana to power various win conditions. The Win of the various combo oriented decks varied, Many featured Myr Incubator which not only served to create even more mana and an army of Myr, but could often be used to remove all the land of the deck and make a Goblin Charbelcher win the game.

Other decks used Fireball or other far more direct approaches.

Unfortunately, KCI has always been overshadowed by its bigger brother, the Affinity deck. Decks designed to hate out affinity always succeeded it pushing back Ironworks as well, and the matchup of KCI vs Affinity rarely went well. On an even sadder note, the bannings of March 20, 2005 designed to derail affinity also took out KCI decks. Currently Extended Legal, KCI has yet to make an impact on the format at the writing of this article.


The Decklists:

Landstill
By Mamajason

Landstill has been popular for the past few years now but really shines in contemporary Legacy. Its based on using man lands such as [CARD]faerie conclave[/CARD] and [CARD]mishras factory[/CARD] to beat down on your opponent while using [CARD]standstill[/CARD] as a draw effect. The manlands allow you to still play your "creatures" and attack while the standstill is in play. Its typically u/r and uses a lot of counters such as [CARD]force of will[/CARD] and burn such as [CARD]lightning bolt[/CARD] and [CARD]fire/ice[/CARD]. There is a u/w version running around which uses [CARD]swords to plowshares[/CARD] and [CARD]wrath of god[/CARD]/[CARD]akromas vengence[/CARD].

Many versions run [CARD]Crucible of worlds[/CARD] or [CARD]isochron specter[/CARD]. The Crucible allows your manlands to infinately chump block as well as allows you to re use fetchlands and [CARD]wasteland[/CARD]s. Isochron is good since this deck runs a lot of cheap instants. Disk is a very good board sweeper, although there is some controversy over it since the loss of mana drain. [CARD]Teferis response[/CARD] is also a fun card in this deck since it both draws you cards and saves your manlands. The bane of this deck is blood moon and back to basics. Not only do they stop your manlands, but they are also enchantments, which red and blue have a problem dealing with. Disk and bounce are useful vs them, and so are red and [CARD]blue elemental blast[/CARD].

Heres a somewhat typical 1.5 Landstill deck. (emphasis on the somewhat ;) )

Land (24)
4 [CARD]Wasteland[/CARD]
4 [CARD]Mishra's Factory[/CARD]
3 [CARD]Faerie Conclave[/CARD]
4 [CARD]Polluted Delta[/CARD]
4 [CARD]Volcanic Island[/CARD]
4 [CARD]Island[/CARD]
1 [CARD]Mountain[/CARD]

Spells (36)
4 [CARD]Lightning Bolt[/CARD]
2 [CARD]Stifle[/CARD]
4 [CARD]Counterspell[/CARD]
4 [CARD]Fire/Ice[/CARD]
4 [CARD]Standstill[/CARD]
3 [CARD]Crucible of Worlds[/CARD]
3 [CARD]Nevinyrrals Disk[/CARD]
4 [CARD]Fact or Fiction[/CARD]
4 [CARD]Force of Will[/CARD]
1 [CARD]Misdirection[/CARD]
3 [CARD]Chain of Vapor[/CARD]

Sideboard (15)

3 [CARD]Teferis Response[/CARD]
2 [CARD]Stifle[/CARD]
4 [CARD]Chill[/CARD]
2 [CARD]Pyroclasm[/CARD]
2 [CARD]Red Elemental Blast[/CARD]
2 [CARD]Blue Elemental Blast[/CARD]

For more information go here:

http://www.gamingetc.com/type%201.5.htm
http://boards1.wizards.com/showpost.php?p=2170393
http://mtgthesource.com/cgi-bin/ikonboard.cgi?;act=ST;f=26;t=4;st=0
Long.dec
By PipOC

Few decks are as infamous as the most powerful deck in history. Burning Desire. Long.

Mike Long didn't create the deck, but he was one of the first to speak of it's merits online, so the name sort of stuck. The original win condition was Hunting Pack, but after some of Type 1's greatest minds got to the deck (such as Steve Menendian), the kill was changed to Tendrils of Agony. After the deck started proving how degenerate it was, WOTC tested the deck themselves and won on turn 1 over 60% of the time in their godlfishing. Hence, key elements of the deck (LED, Burning Wish) were restricted. The basic idea behind the deck now lives on in DeathLong, which uses Death Wish instead.

3 Chromatic Sphere
4 Lions Eye Diamond
5 Moxen
1 Lotus Petal
1 Black Lotus
1 Mana Crypt
1 Mana Vault
1 Sol Ring
1 Mox Diamond
4 Dark Ritual
4 Gemstone Mine
4 City of Brass
1 Tolarian Academy
2 Underground Sea
4 Duress
4 Brainstorm
1 Chain of Vapor
4 Burning Wish
1 Ancestral Recall
1 Time Walk
1 Mystical Tutor
1 Vampiric Tutor
1 Demonic Tutor
1 Demonic Consultation
1 Timetwister
1 Wheel of Fortune
1 Windfall
1 Tinker
1 Minds Desire
1 Necropotence
1 Yawgmoths Bargain
1 Memory Jar
1 Tendrils of Agony

Sideboard:
1 Tendrils of Agony
1 Yawgmoths Will
1 Diminishing Returns
4 Xantid Swarm
1 Balance
1 Primitive Justice
1 Meltdown
1 Hull Breach
4 Overload

60% wins on turn 1. It could do that through Force of Will no less. Burning wish for yawgmoth's will was one of the most popular plays in type one for a long while before the DCI stepped in.

The deck plays out fast mana then plays a couple business spells finding a burning wish or a draw7. Lions eye diamond fuels this craziness, even after it was neutured by errata, by breaking it in response to a tutor, a draw7 or yawgmoth's will you could generate 3 mana for a negligible cost. Yawgmoth's Will allows you replay all you fast mana, your dark rituals, your LEDs, and allow you to use them as black lotuses with no drawback, then allowed you to replay all your draw spells, eventually allowing you to find a burning wish or a tendrils and win.

Helpful links:
http://www.starcitygames.com/php/news/article/6509.html
Madness
By Skankhair

Madness is an aggro/control deck that revolves around playing cards for their *cheaper* Madness cost by using discard outlets like Wild Mongrel, and Careful Study. It also makes good use of cards with a cheaper Flashback cost.

Madness is usually U/G and often called U/G Madness, but Red is sometimes used as well, and some less standard builds even use White.

Madness was very popular when it was T2 legal (around 2002-2003) but is also viable in Extended, T1.5, AND T1.

Madness cards:
Basking Rootwalla
Arrogant Wurm
Circular Logic

Flashback cards:
Roar of the Wurm
Deep Analysis

Outlets:
Wild Mongrel
Aquamoeba
Merfolk Looter
Careful Study

Bonus!!!
Anger (only if splashing Red)
Wonder
Genesis

Here's a T2 list from Worlds 2003 played by Dave Humpherys:

8 Forest
11 Island
1 Centaur Garden
2 City of Brass

4 Aquamoeba
3 Arrogant Wurm
4 Basking Rootwalla
4 Wild Mongrel
3 Wonder

4 Careful Study
4 Circular Logic
2 Deep Analysis
1 Krosan Reclamation
2 Quiet Speculation
1 Ray of Revelation
3 Roar of the Wurm
3 Unsummon

Sideboard:
1 Deep Analysis
2 Envelop
1 Krosan Reclamation
2 Mana Leak
2 Nantuko Vigilante
2 Phantom Centaur
1 Ray of Revelation
2 Stupefying Touch
1 Unsummon
1 Wonder

In Extended, Madness picks up Yavimaya Coast, Chrome Mox, Daze, and Masticore. All of which power-up the deck.

In T1.5, Madness gains Survival of the Fittest, and Lions Eye Diamond, both of which have great synergy with the deck and spawn the Survival Madness and LED Madness variants. Madness also gets dual lands in T1.5.

In T1, Bazaar Madness is popular (and possible). Bazaar of Baghdad has great synergy with the deck.

Here's a Bazaar Madness primer by Glenchuy for the T1 FAQ:
http://boards1.wizards.com/showpost.php?p=4912072
MesaCraft
By force_of_will

this was one of my favorite decks, way back when i was a scrub, when i could actually play combo

it involvest the simple combination of earthcraft +sacred mesa and either wild growth or fertile ground on a plains. and was one of the first combos to be devoloped around the powerful, and possibly broken card earthcraft to produce massive amounts of flying like minions of doom to kill the world and enslave the squirrells.

the combo was actaully extreemly easy to get off, especially in a scrub meta that had very little control. and actually extreemly fun to play too.

here is an updated example that can only be used for casual play (earth craft was restircted last year)

mesa craft

land:

4 windswept heath
7 plains
6 forest
1 serras sanctum

creatures:

4 acadmey rector
4 soul warden

other spells

4 earthcraft
4 sacred mesa
4 wild growth
4 fertile ground
4 sterling grove
4 wrath of god
4 enlightened tutor
3 seal of cleansing
1 worship
1 city of solitude
1 rule of law

s.b.
none at time your guess it as good as mine.
Necro
By Skankhair

Necro is an infamous Black deck that dominated multiple formats from about 1996 to 1998. Back then, decklists weren't as standardized as they are now, so Necro decklists vary quite a bit. Some are closer to pure aggro, some are aggro/control, and some are basically aggressive Black Control decks. However, some things pop up in most Necro decks. Necropotence is one (duh), as well as some way to recoup life to draw more cards with Necropotence (Ivory Tower, Zuran Orb). Pump Knights like Order of the Ebon Hand, Black Knight, and Hypnotic Specter were the win conditions.

Here's a couple sample decklists:

16 Swamp
4 Strip Mine

4 Necropotence
4 Black Knight
4 Knight of Stromgald
4 Hypnotic Specter
4 Contigation
4 Dark Ritual
4 Demonic Consultation
4 Drain Life
2 Zuran Orb
2 Nevinyrrals Disk
2 Icy Manipulator
2 Ivory Tower

---

Land (24):
16 Swamp
4 Strip Mine
4 Mishras Factory

Creatures (16):
4 Black Knight
4 Knight of Stromgald
4 Order of the Ebon Hand
4 Hypnotic Specter

Other (20):
4 Dark Ritual
4 Hymn to Tourach
4 Necropotence
2 Demonic Consultation
2 Zuran Orb
2 Ivory Tower
2 Nevinyrrals Disk

It was also common to only run 3 Necropotences, and later, Red became a common splash (Lauerpotence).

Compared to Type 2 decks of later years, Necro isn't very good. It's funny to compare such a dominating deck to T2 decks of today and see how underpowered it was. This isn't because new sets are better (because they aren't). I think it's because people just understand deckbuilding more today, and because the Internet became more popular, decklists became more standardized as people from around the world could share test results and arrive at a better version of the deck. Also, these old Necro decks just barely pre-dated mana curve theory, so they are very cluttered at 2cc and tend to waste turn 1, and have weak turn 3s.

Necro also did well in Type 1. The Type 1 versions of Necro are horrid compared to current Type 1 decks, but we have a much larger cardpool today, so that is to be expected. A modern Type 1 version of Necropotence would of course be much more powerful, but there are better uses of 4x Necropotence than swinging with pump Knights.

Necropotence is now restricted/banned/too old in every format, so Necro is relegated to casual players with historical interest.
Neo-Academy
By PipOC

Even with 7 restrictions to it's credit academy wasn't dead. With, gobs of fast mana, and draw7s out the wazoo, the deck could still power out the early insane kills. The deck is based around the largest(cardwise) successful combo in magic history. Tolarian Academy, 8 random artifacts, Candelabra of Tawnos ,and Capsize the deck produced infinite mana, or just a really high amount by looping the deck in mana cycles, it eventually used a colossal Braingeyser, or Stroke of Genius to finish the opponent off.


2 Abeyance
1 Ancestral Recall
1 Black Lotus
1 Braingeyser
2 Candelabra of Tawnos
1 Capsize
1 Crop Rotation
1 Demonic Tutor
1 Fastbond
4 Force of Will
1 Frantic Search
1 Grim Monolith
4 Helm of Awakening
4 Impulse
1 Lotus Petal
1 Mana Crypt
1 Mana Vault
4 Meditate
1 Mind over Matter
1 Mox Diamond
1 Mox Emerald
1 Mox Jet
1 Mox Pearl
1 Mox Ruby
1 Mox Sapphire
1 Mystical Tutor
1 Regrowth
1 Sol Ring
1 Stroke of Genius
1 Time Spiral
1 Time Walk
1 Timetwister
1 Vampiric Tutor
1 Wheel of Fortune
1 Windfall

4 City of Brass
4 Gemstone Mine
1 Tolarian Academy
2 Undiscovered Paradise

SIDEBOARD
1 Balance
1 Mind Twist
4 Misdirection
4 Phyrexian Negator
3 Red Elemental Blast
2 Seal of Cleansing
Opposition
By Skankhair

Oppisition is a fairly broad term that includes many variants. Essentially, an Oppisition deck is any deck that seeks to abuse Opposition.

The first archtype to do this that I know of was Type 2 Merfolk Opposition in 2000/2001. Merfolk Opposition used about 20 Merfolk, some counter magic, some draw, and the Opposition/Static Orb combo to put the other player in a lock. Each turn they could only untap 2 things, which you would re-tap with Opposition (by tapping 2 Merfolk). Then, at the end of their turn, you tap Static Orb with a third Merfolk so that you get a full untap phase.

Merfolk Opposition 2001 Worlds 2nd place Alex Borteh

Land (20):
20 Island

Creatures (20):
4 Lord of Atlantis
4 Merfolk Looter
4 Merfolk of the Pearl Trident
4 Vodalian Merchant
2 Darting Merfolk
2 Waterfront Bouncer

Other Spells (20):
4 Counterspell
4 Thwart
4 Gush
4 Opposition
4 Static Orb

Sideboard (15):
2 Prodigal Sorcerer
3 Hibernation
3 Mana Maze
2 Misdirection
2 Teferis Response
2 Wash Out
1 Rushing River

The next T2 season, Static Orb was no longer legal and many players felt some of the new legal cards would make for a better aggro base to the Opposition archtype. Enter Squirrel Opposition.

While Merfolk Oppisition basically had a Merfolk Aggro/Control deck as its base, Squirrel Opposition had a U/G/R Madness deck as its base. While it could not use the OrbOpposition lock, it would play the stalling game with Squirrel Nest and Opposition if the aggro assault did not work.

Squirrel Opposition 2002 Worlds 5th Place Sim Han How

Land (22):
8 Forest
5 Island
3 Karplusan Forest
2 Shivan Reef
4 Yavimaya Coast

Creatures (21):
4 Birds of Paradise
3 Flametongue Kavu
3 Llanowar Elves
4 Merfolk Looter
3 Phantom Centaur
4 Wild Mongrel

Other (17):
4 Circular Logic
3 Deep Analysis
3 Fire/Ice
4 Opposition
3 Squirrel Nest

Lately, Opposition decks have been making an impact on Extended PTQs. Squirrel Opposition is back, and there are new variants as well.
Pirates
By PipOC

YARR!!! Ye who dint want to be a pirate when ye was wee be a true scalliwag indeed. Pirates, the best extended deck that ever was...ok well not really, but a guy can dream can't he. Pirates is a mono blue control deck based around mana denial, such as Rishadan Cutpurse, Rishadan Footpad, Hoodwink and Boomerang. It uses Isochron Scepter to recur it's many instants, and finishes the opponent with Morphling or Parallax Tide and Ankh of Mishra.

// Lands
4 [TE] Wasteland
12 [IN] Island
4 [ON] Flooded Strand
1 [ON] Polluted Delta

// Creatures
2 [MM] Rishadan Cutpurse
3 [MM] Rishadan Footpad
2 [US] Morphling
4 [8E] Spiketail Hatchling

// Spells
4 [IA] Brainstorm
2 [MM] Hoodwink
3 [MM] Counterspell
2 [6E] Mystical Tutor
3 [NE] Seal of Removal
4 [MR] Isochron Scepter
4 [8E] Mana Leak
4 [5E] Boomerang
1 [SC] Stifle
1 [UL] Rebuild

// Sideboard
2 [SC] Stifle
1 [UL] Rebuild
3 [US] Stern Proctor
4 [5E] Energy Flux
R/G Beatz
By [supa_t(im)]

R/G Beatz is an aggressive deck based upon traditional Sligh and traditional Stompy. Beatz tries to keep the aggressiveness of Sligh but fix some of its weaknesses by adding green.

Somewhat classic examples of R/G Beatz can be found in Extended, T1.5, and T1. Modern versions of the deck are even found in T2, though they cannot use many (if any) of the classic staples of the archtype. The combination of Red and Green in an aggressive deck just, well, works.

I will mainly cover T1 R/G Beatz. Beatz is currently unviable in T1, but still fun. There is a viable R/G deck called R/G Tempo which is superficially similar to R/G Beatz, but it plays differently, and is a completely different deck.

Similar to Sligh, Beatz uses cheap efficient creatures and burn to make those creatures get through. The addition of green gives Beatz a better selection of creatures like Kird Ape, River Boa, Basking Rootwalla, and Quirion Sentinel. Green also gives the greatest pump card in the game: Rancor. These cards can give the deck more aggressiveness by increasing your clock on the opponent. Other Sligh creatures like Grim Lavamancer, Jackal Pup, and Mogg Fanatic can, and should, be used.

The burn stays largely the same as in Sligh. Lightning Bolt is still the best burn, with Chain Lightning as its slower brother. Incinerate is always good as well. With Quirion Sentinel you have a serious tempo boost with a lot of one casting cost spells. A good card that goes well with sentinel is Reckless Charge. With proper acceleration you can cast sentinel then charge turn one to remove a quarter of your opponent's life.

Speaking of acceleration, Beatz' manabase has access to the most broken unrestricted mana acceleration: Elvish Spirit Guide. This card allows for some pretty crazy first turn plays, and allows you to tap out and still have regeneration mana. Worst case scenario, she's a 2/2 vanilla for three mana. Never a dead card. If you have them the on color moxen (Mox Ruby and Mox Emerald) are great, but definitely not needed. As for other permanent mana sources, obviously basic Forests and Mountains are to be used. Fortunately since red and green are "allied" colors, Beatz has access to easy mana fixing. The ever useful Wooded Foothills are good for mana fixing, deck thining, and fueling your Grim Lavamancer. Although expensive, Taiga are quite useful, as are Karplusan Forest. While the non-basic lands are helpful, basics work fine as well. If you are looking into spending some money on the deck, go for the fetchlands first. Some other good lands to invest in are Wastelands and a Strip Mine. They give the deck some mana denial, which is quite useful.

A decent decklist is as follows:

R/G Beatz 60
Mana 24
Land 12
4 Taiga
4 Wooded Foothills
2 Forest
2 Mountain
Disruption 5
4 Wasteland
1 Strip Mine
Acceleration 7
1 Mox Emerald
1 Mox Ruby
1 Black Lotus
4 Elvish Spirit Guide

Creatures 20
4 Kird Ape
4 River Boa
4 Grim Lavamancer
4 Quirion Sentinel
4 Basking Rootwalla/Mogg Fanatic/Jackal Pup (Metagame Slot)

Spells/Utility 16
4 Lightning Bolt
4 Chain Lightning
4 Rancor
4 Incinerate/Naturalize/Reckless Charge (Metagame Slot)

(Sample) Sideboard 15
4 Red Elemental Blast
4 Gorilla Shaman
4 Naturalize (if not MD)/Artifact Mutation
3 Blood Moon

Some of the metagame slots are also budget replacements (ex. Reckless Charge instead of Chain Lightning). The manabase is really the only expensive thing in the deck, and can definitely be cheapened by using basics. One final note about the manabase, it can go a little lower on the mana since the deck is pure aggro, and functions on a very low mana curve, so if you feel comfortable with the deck you can experiment with the mana a little to fit in some more business spells. For the purpose of this guide, I'm giving you the most stable manabase.
R/G Tempo
By [supa_t(im)]

R/G Tempo is an exclusively type1 disruption based deck superficially similar to Here. It packs enough disruption that many people (including myself) think of it as an aggro-control deck. Some think of it as just an aggro deck with a relatively high amount of disruption. In any case, the disruption R/G Tempo packs is what makes it viable in type 1. It was designed to compete in a field of Mishras Workshop and Goblin Welder based decks, but also to hold its own against combo.

R/G Tempo also gets its name from the disruption it uses. It uses tempo disrupting cards on the opponent, while using cheap efficient beaters to create tempo for itself. It disrupts tempo with various mana denial strategies. Heading up its mana denial is the broad Root Maze. This is the core of the deck, it will not function properly without root maze. Root maze helps against every matchup, especially the deck’s worst ones, mostly combo. Supplementing root maze, R/G Tempo uses strip effects (Wasteland and Strip Mine) and Gorilla Shaman. The strip effects help to take out various land that now come into play tapped with root maze. Gorilla shaman (aptly named “mox monkey”) removes all sorts of fast artifact mana characteristic of the format, which also come into play tapped. Some builds also run Ankh of Mishra to further press the mana denial theme.

The creatures of R/G Tempo are very similar to Beatz. River Boa, Kird Ape and Grim Lavamancer are used. These creatures, along with Gorilla Shaman make up the threatbase of the deck. Rancor is still used to give the deck a little more aggressiveness, which can be quite effective when slapped onto a river boa. The threatbase may seems small, but against the decks R/G Tempo was designed to take on, its solid. Still, there has been some experimentation with the threats, trying things like Mogg Fanatic, Skyshroud Elite, and Wild Mongrel to try to increase threat concentration.

The manabase is the exact same as I listed in Beatz. However, since this is a competitive deck, you really want to have the expensive non-basic lands. Taiga are used for mana fixing and the classic first turn Kird Ape play. Wooded Foothills are also necessary as it fetches both basics (to protect against opposing Wasteland) and to provide fuel for yout Grim Lavamancer. Wasteland and a Strip Mine are necessary for the disruption element. For acceleration the same Elvish Spirit Guide is used in Beatz should be used here. The on color moxen (Mox Emerald, Mox Ruby) and Black Lotus should also be used if you have access to them, or if you are allowed proxies.

The burn in the deck is a little lighter than in Beatz since more room was needed for disruption. Lightning Bolt should still be used, since it’s the best. Other burn cards have been debated. Chain Lighting could be used since it has the best damage to mana ratio besides lightning bolt. Magma Jet can be used because it allows for a sort of pseudo draw in the deck. And Incinerate could be used if you prefer the instant speed. One in particular is a carry over from Sligh, and that is Fireblastblast. Not a 4 of in the deck because it’s a finisher, but it really helps to end games quicker. The decks using Ankh of Mishra sometimes use Shrapnel Blast. The decks that don’t either run more burn or Naturalize to help some bad matchups. For the last 2 slots there has been a lot of discussion, however, I like to use 2 Bounty of the Hunt. This is because it removes some dead cards later game like Root Maze, ESG, and Naturalize. I’ve also been experimenting with 2 Wild Mongrel in this spot, because it serves the same purpose, but increases threats, and can get really big.

My current decklist is

R/G Tempo 60
Mana 24
Land 12
4 Taiga
4 Wooded Foothills
2 Forest
2 Mountain
Disruption 5
4 Wasteland
1 Strip Mine
Acceleration 7
1 Mox Emerald
1 Mox Ruby
1 Black Lotus
4 Elvish Spirit Guide

Creatures 16
4 Kird Ape
4 River Boa
4 Grim Lavamancer
4 Gorilla Shaman

Spells/Utility 20
4 Lightning Bolt
2 Fireblast
4 Root Maze
4 Rancor
4 Naturalize (Ankh of Mishra also use here)
2 Bounty of the Hunt (testing with Wild Mongrel here)

Sideboard 15
4 Red Elemental Blast
4 Pyrostatic Pillar
4 Artifact Mutation
3 Null Rod

The SB is geared toward Mishras Workshop based decks and storm combo, with some more control hosers.

If you haven’t already noticed, the deck is still changing and being tested. This is because its still relatively new. Thanks go out to ShadyPhoenix, dralock, xrobx (TMD), Revvik (TMD), and MCS (TMD) for working with the deck.

For more in depth discussion check out these links:
http://www.themanadrain.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=21139
http://www.themanadrain.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=21846
Sligh
By Skankhair

Basic Info: Sligh is a mono-Red aggro deck that runs weenies like Jackal Pup, and Mogg Fanatic, as well as burn such as Lightning Bolt, and Incinerate. The typical Sligh ratio is around 20 land, 20 creatures, and 20 other spells.

The burn is generally used to kill blockers so the attacking creatures get through, then is aimed at the other player to finish them off.

Sligh's burn gives it an advantage against control decks which have lots of ways to deal with creatures, since it gives Sligh a way to win without attacking. However, it makes it slightly weaker against other aggro decks because other aggro decks tend to have a better creature-base. Sligh has long been a bane of control decks, but is also run over by more creature-oriented aggro decks, and has few ways to deal with combo decks.

Sligh was one of the first decks to use the concept of a mana curve to maximize threats and damage. In Sligh's early days, some people thought it was a bad deck full of bad cards that got lucky and won sometimes. Some thought it was a deck full of bad cards that somehow worked together and won. Today, we understand that the math behind the deck is what made it work- the mana curve.

Sligh got its name from Paul Sligh who used the deck in a PTQ in 1996. He didn't design the deck, but he popularized it. During the Tempest-era, Sligh was a popular deck and for several years it won quite a bit. It remains a viable deck, or at least a viable idea, in several formats. It is no longer viable in Type 1, but it's spirit lives on in Type 1.5, Extended, and Type 2.

The Decklists:



Matchups, Other Notes, ect.:Other Sligh staples include Fireblast, Ball Lightning, and Blistering Firecat... each of which are incredibly efficient for their mana costs.

Also see: Red Deck Wins, Ponza, Goblin Sligh

Relevant Links:
Articles on Sligh, Red decks in general, and the philosophy behind them:
http://boards1.wizards.com/showthread.php?t=313804
http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=mtgcom/daily/ash24
http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=mtgcom/feature/221
http://www.starcitygames.com/php/news/expandnews.php?Article=8141
http://boards1.wizards.com/showthread.php?t=327677
Stompy
By Skankhair

Stompy is a traditionally mono-Green aggro deck that runs aggressive creatures and creature pump. Critters such as River Boa, Blurred Mongoose, Rogue Elephant, and Wild Dogs are typical Stompy choices along with pump such as Rancor, Briar Shield, Elephant Guide, and Giant Growth.

The original Stompy decks ran a "normal" amount of land for an aggro deck, which is somewhere around 20. However, a more modern version of Stompy called "10-Land Stompy" later rose to popularity to the point that people now instantly think of 10-Land Stompy when someone mentions Stompy in general.

10-Land Stompy runs, well, 10-Land as well as things like Land Grant, and Elvish Spirit Guide to make sure it has mana to cast its spells. It does this to maximize the amount of threats it draws as Land Grant thins the library of land (to make late-game draws more aggressive) and Elvish Spirit Guide can function as mana early on, or a beater in the late-game when you don't need more mana.

Stompy made its first appearence on the scene in about 1997 in the T2 format. It remained a force in T2 in 1998 and 1999 as well as Extended and T1 at the time. Today, Stompy is no longer viable in T1 as the environment is now, and it's not exactly viable in T1.5 or Extended either though it's more playable in those formats. Stompy is a very popular archtype in casual to this day.

A Stompy variant is called Oshawa Stompy. It runs Survival of the Fittest to fetch utility creatures and sometimes splashes White. It is designed to help Stompy beat combo and thus, tends to be more viable in T1 and (old) T1.5 than standard Stompy decks.

Matt Linde, 4th place at Worlds 1999

Land (22):
14 Forest
4 Gaeas Cradle
4 Treetop Village

Creatures (26):
4 Llanowar Elves
4 Elvish Lyrist
4 Albino Troll
4 Pouncing Jaguar
4 River Boa
4 Wild Dogs
2 Uktabi Orangutan

Other Spells (12):
4 Rancor
4 Giant Growth
4 Cursed Scroll

Sideboard (15):
2 Uktabi Orangutan
2 Weatherseed Treefolk
3 Choke
2 Constant Mists
2 Overrun
1 Hurricane
3 Thran Foundry

10-Land Stompy

Land (10):
10 Forest

Creatures (27):
4 Elvish Spirit Guide
4 Ghazban Ogre
4 Mtenda Lion
4 Pouncing Jaguar
4 Wild Dogs
4 Quirion Ranger
3 Rogue Elephant

Other (23):
4 Land Grant
4 Giant Growth
4 Bounty of the Hunt
4 Rancor
4 Briar Shield
3 Winter Orb

Relevant Links:

http://boards1.wizards.com/showpost.php?p=520830
Stax / $T4KS
By PipOC

The Four Thousand Dollar Solution. It's big, it's mean, it's brown, it's smokestack. Prison is the most evil deck type, completely stopping your opponent from doing anything. With more mana denial than you can shake a stick at it doesn't come purer than stax. Trinisphere, Tangle Wire, Smokestack, and Crucible of Worlds all combine to murder your opponents mana base and make oodles and oodles of tempo.

1 Black Lotus
3 Crucible of Worlds
1 Duplicant
1 Mana Crypt
1 Mana Vault
1 Memory Jar
1 Mox Emerald
1 Mox Jet
1 Mox Pearl
1 Mox Ruby
1 Mox Sapphire
4 Smokestack
1 Sol Ring
1 Sundering Titan
4 Tangle Wire
4 Trinisphere
1 Triskelion
1 Ancestral Recall
1 Mystical Tutor
3 Thirst for Knowledge
1 Time Walk
1 Timetwister
1 Tinker
4 Goblin Welder
1 Wheel of Fortune
2 Ancient Tomb
2 Island
4 Mishras Workshop
2 Polluted Delta
1 Strip Mine
1 Tolarian Academy
4 Volcanic Island
4 Wasteland

Sideboard
2 Blood Moon
1 Blue Elemental Blast
4 Chalice of the Void
1 Pyroblast
2 Rack and Ruin
2 Red Elemental Blast
2 Triskelion
1 Viashino Heretic

Workshop Family Primer by glenchuy (includes Stax):
http://boards1.wizards.com/showpost.php?p=516233