Official Ruling Needed: How are diseases resolved?

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I'm asking for some ruling from up high in the LFR administration, as there is no clarity as to when a disease should be resolved. The way each option plays out is very different, and thus I feel it is necessary to have a campaign ruling.

There are two possibilities:
1. Resolve over each extended rest as per the DMG, meaning you will likely play out the disease effects over many modules but have more chances to cure.
2. Resolve completely at the table, which can reduce the effects to future modules or may result in one horrendous result.
3. (Theoretically, you could also rule that diseases are auto-cured at the end of a mod, but that seems pointless as diseases are an important part of monster difficulty)

Both options have problems.

[SBLOCK=A review of how disease work:]
Certain monsters have diseases. As part of a power, they inflict disease. In a single combat you could easily have more than one disease and players could be infected by several diseases. Lycanthrope encounters are a great example.

A disease has no effect when it first affects you in a combat. This can be hard to understand from a reading of the DMG. Because of the way the rules work, the disease is only a factor for later combats and never for the combat where infection took place. At the end of the combat where you were infected you make a saving throw and apply the Initial effects of the disease if you fail. This then affects the next combats/encounter.

Once the party takes an extended rest, you check progression. Everyone makes an Endurance check (a PC can also make a Heal check to help one PC throughout the extended rest). Any disease has two DCs. The lower one is the one you have to hit to stay at that level and not worsen. The second DC is to improve. (Several diseases have received DC Errata, some of which is not incorporated into an LFR mod).

It is very easy for diseases to see-saw back and forth over many extended rests. You might get worse on the first roll, then back to Initial, then back, etc. Eventually you either are cured or reach the Final State.

Once you reach the Final State, there is generally no cure outside of a Cure Disease ritual. [/SBLOCK]

Diseases and LFR:

A sidetrack on rituals:
At 08:19 PM 9/28/2008, howie232002 wrote:
>The market value of a scroll is 360gp, and the components are also
>required, another 150gp, for a total of 510gp. This is more gold
>than a character can expect to acquire in 4 low tier adventures. The
>scroll, a 6th level item, cannot be purchased by PCs playing 1-4, nor
>can be obtained as a bundle by 1st level characters.

As Brian Gibbons noted, this is a higher cost than raising someone from the dead, meaning some PCs may select to kill themselves as a cheaper cure.


A typical LFR mod will not have more than one extended rest. Because of this, your typical LFR mod will leave you diseased but without yet having made a single check to see how the disease progresses.

Let's examine how this plays out under both options:

1. Resolve over many mods:

If you resolve over many mods, you have to track this carefully (presumably in the notes section of your log sheet). Whenever you get an extended rest (probably 1-2 times per mod), you have to see if there is a cure disease ritual (the easy fix, though the gold cost is high) or someone who can make the save for you at a better plus or if you should make the roll yourself.

At the end of each extended rest you roll your Endurance, and see whether you get worse or better. The result could apply an effect to the whole mod, such as these initial and intermediate effects:

Filth Fever, Initial Effect: Lose 1 healing surge.
Moon Frenzy, Initial Effect: -2 to Will defense.
Filth Fever, intermediate effect: -2 to AC, Fort, and Reflex defenses.
Moon Frenzy, Intermediate Effect: While bloodied, must make a save at the end of each turn. If fail, make a melee attack on its next turn against a random target w/in 5 sq. If none are available, move in a random direction.

Because of the way LFR mods (1-2 extended rests/mod) and diseases work, you could easily see-saw back and forth initial and intermediate a few times, extending those effects over several mods. In our test involving an encounter inflicting one or two diseases to 3 out of 4 infected players (these were 5th level PCs, two of them dwarves!), we had 5 extended rests to reach the final stage or cure of a disease, and 4 for another player.

Eventually, you are either cured or reach the final stage. In most cases, this would be at the end of an LFR mod. While not explicit, I would expect at least one extended rest per mod (presumably you at least have adventures on different days).

2. Resolve the disease completely at the table

This is easiest from a paperwork standpoint, but means you skip all the intermediate effects, some of which are cool and some which have huge impacts that would never come into play as designed in the DMG/MM, devaluing the impact of those monsters' powers.

At the end of the mod you would either use a ritual or roll until you are cured or reach the Final State. As noted, this can take a lot of rolling from the see-sawing across stages. While the DCs are often low, they were easy to fail for a table of 5 with two diseases in play and one good cleric that could help via their heal check.

Resolving at the table will result in some really strange effects carrying into the next mod if you miss the saves and end up with the Final State:

Filth Fever (Lev 3, DC11/16): -2 AC/For/Ref, lose all healing surges
and cannot regain HP.
Moon Frenzy (Lev 8, DC19/14): Attack nearest creature in line of
sight. If can't see any other creatures, move in a random direction.
Blinding Sickness (Level 9, DC15/20): Blinded until cured.
Mummy Rot (Lev 11, variable check): Die.

Of course, you could end up with more than one Final State if you had several diseases.

Those are some of the lower level diseases, and we may or may not see them in the next round of mods. Spoiler:
Show
We do! There are mods out there with some of these diseases!


So, we play a mod with Lycanthropes. You have a poor Endurance check, and you fail to get DC16 before you get two DC10 or lower (not that hard to have happen out of 6 players). Now have reached the final stage. You start the next mod without any healing surges, with -2 to all defenses except will, and without the ability to regain HP. Yeah, that should be fun... And Moon Frenzy... I mean that PC can't even take part in RP with NPCs. They would have to spend the whole mod tied up and gagged. It is debatable whether they should even earn XP!

Advantages and Disadvantages of Either System:

Resolving across many mods most closely resembles the DMG and MM. It imposes penalties over time with the greater possibility of curing or accruing the gold to help cast a ritual. You would play through intermediate stages, which can be challenging. You have to track the disease carefully over time.

Resolving at the end of the mod completely removes the challenge or intermediate stages and thus does not reflect core rules accurately. If you roll well (or have someone with the ritual or the heal skill), you walk away without any problems. If you fail, very possible at a table with no ritual or no real skill to substitute, you can have some pretty horrible effects to the point of making your PC unplayable for the next mod. It is unclear what a DM should do with an unplayable PC. Rolling can take up some time, perhaps adding a good 20-30 minutes if the rules have to be explained. It took me some 30 minutes to read through the rules on disease and make the rolls for 3 players.

Because each way of playing is so vastly different, I really feel we have to see a campaign guideline on how this should be run. Having one player whose judge ruled they have to roll over many tables and one player with a judge whose judge ruled it is resolved at the end of the mod is not equitable. I don't have a hard preference, but some guidance is needed:

- Which method to use (at table or over many mods)
- If tracked over many mods, whether there is always a single extended rest inherent in any mod that doesn't explicitly state a number of extended rests (1 extended rest being the obvious minimum).

Thanks,

Teos

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The disease progression should be played out at the table. Assume several extended rests happen, until the disease is cured naturally, until it reaches its final state, or until it is cured with a ritual or power. If it reaches final effect, those effects remain until the disease is cured, even between adventures.

PCs may purchase a cure disease ritual for 180gp (20% above cost) or have another PC cast it at cost. The PCs may share the cost.

Shawn
LFR Global Admin
The PHB lists cure disease at the market price of 360gp. What am I missing?


The disease progression should be played out at the table. Assume several extended rests happen, until the disease is cured naturally, until it reaches its final state, or until it is cured with a ritual or power. If it reaches final effect, those effects remain until the disease is cured, even between adventures.

PCs may purchase a cure disease ritual for 180gp (20% above cost) or have another PC cast it at cost. The PCs may share the cost.

Shawn
LFR Global Admin

The +20% value is based of the component cost of the ritual (150 gp).

Of course... with no judge sign off, etc., having a disease continue from mod to mod would be totally based on the honor system.
Sorry WOTC, you lost me with Essentials. So where I used to buy every book that came out, now I will be very choosy about what I buy. Can we just get back to real 4e? Check out the 4e Conversion Wiki. 1. Wizards fight dirty. They hit their enemies in the NADs. -- Dragon9 2. A barbarian hits people with his axe. A warlord hits people with his barbarian. 3. Boo-freakin'-hoo, ya light-slingin' finger-wigglers. -- MrCelcius in response to the Cleric's Healer's Lore nerf
The PHB lists the price to buy the cure disease ritual (as a scroll or a book) at 360 gp, but in LFR anyone can pay a NPC priest who knows the ritual for the component cost (150 gp) plus 20% fee, (total 180 gp) to simply cast the ritual for you, if you only need the effect.

Keith
Keith Hoffman LFR Writing Director for Waterdeep
PCs may purchase a cure disease ritual for 180gp (20% above cost) or have another PC cast it at cost. The PCs may share the cost.

That's great, but this is the sort of thing that belongs in campaign documentation.

In a module, a DM is free to charge whatever they'd like for NPCs to perform rituals, as there are no rules. Component cost +20% makes sense, but it's just as likely that a DM will charge the cost of a scroll+component cost, or just the component cost.

For that matter, a DM is free to add a wandering NPC priest that owes the party a favor and does the ritual for free, or say that the nearest NPC who knows that ritual is two weeks' travel away.

Unless I missed the release of CCG v 1.8, saying that "in LFR anyone can pay a NPC priest who knows the ritual for the component cost plus 20% fee" as if this is something everyone should know is a bit misleading.
That's great, but this is the sort of thing that belongs in campaign documentation.

In a module, a DM is free to charge whatever they'd like for NPCs to perform rituals, as there are no rules. Component cost +20% makes sense, but it's just as likely that a DM will charge the cost of a scroll+component cost, or just the component cost.

For that matter, a DM is free to add a wandering NPC priest that owes the party a favor and does the ritual for free, or say that the nearest NPC who knows that ritual is two weeks' travel away.

Unless I missed the release of CCG v 1.8, saying that "in LFR anyone can pay a NPC priest who knows the ritual for the component cost plus 20% fee" as if this is something everyone should know is a bit misleading.

Or worse, since it requires DM adjudication, some might say that you cannot get NPC casters to cast any rituals other than Raise Dead.
We are starting to put the instructions about diseases in the LFR adventures. There is some possibility that the next update of the adventure template will have boilerplate to address it.

Keith
Keith Hoffman LFR Writing Director for Waterdeep
Does Death (and the raise dead/death charity clause) cure a disease?

I just want to point out that it is conceivable that a character "falls upon misfortune" after the last encounter because of the disease, and thus invokes death charity clause. This could be a potential abuse.
Does Death (and the raise dead/death charity clause) cure a disease?

I just want to point out that it is conceivable that a character "falls upon misfortune" after the last encounter because of the disease, and thus invokes death charity clause. This could be a potential abuse.

While the rules aren't incredibly clear, most diseases, as we know them today, are parasitic in nature. If the host dies, the disease dies soon after.

My personal opinion would be that Death is the "Ultimate Cure". I'd say losing the ability to take GP/Bundle from a module because of a disease is unlikely to be abusive.
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I already have had to pay to get a disease cured in game once, the DM charged me the component cost of it, this was the many hands make light work mod where you have three Sisters gratitude from the newly founded temple of selune there. It was given that after helping them get the temple setup that they would perform the ritual at component cost given the conditions. This was already more gold than I was making on this adventure as it was and I'm thinking that the DC's may have been in need of errata.
But either way it makes the disease rules nothing but suck, there is nothing at all interesting about how disease works in rpga games, it's basically roll several times to see if you earn or lose money on the adventure. They may as well just give the monsters a daily attack power that has you roll percentile and if you roll under a 5 you lose 150 gold and can't be affected by the attack till the next adventure again, it's the same result. I think disease has it's place in a normal campaign but RPGA play just doesn't fit well with it. Diseases should have had tiers perhaps, heroic level paragon and epics, with the same ritual curing all 3 but with different component costs, like raise dead only cheaper, 50g 500g 5000g would have made sense. Still huge costs but at lower tier you could still at least earn some money in the mod you just played instead of going backwards.
Blah blah blah
All the PCs with which I played that gained filth fever solved it through Heal and Endurance checks. In a couple of cases it took days before the PC recovered. In LFR there are no TUs and hence nothing that prevents the PCs from spending that time. Note that none reached the end phase of the disease and you only need the ritual once you reach the last phase.
Last table I resolved it by proposing to the DM:
I rolled the initial save because that one would have influenced the game mechanically. The rest we just waved, my character had a nice Endurance skill and there were two priests with Heal trained so I would have gotten rid of it in the long run.

Not the nicest solution but practical due to the time constrained at the time.
I've had to deal with disease twice as a DM... once they had someone who could take 10 with Heal to treat, so they were down 1 surge for the adventure and then it was cured.

The second time I forgot to tell the two dwarf fighter types who got hit to make their saves at the end of the encounter, realized a little bit later and shrugged figuring they woulda Enduranced out of it even if they failed and weren't low on surges and, well, the mod was already running a little late so I was in a hurry

Resolving it does make endurance and heal more useful, at least... and I don't think there's any tenable way to make it work across modules so I agree that resolving it immediately is the way to go.

I would suggest that the powers what be consider setting a price for a normal Healer's care, however, as that should be significantly cheaper than the ritual in heroic tier. Many diseases a 'take 10' will prevent worsening or cure from a halfway competent person with the Heal skill.
Keith Richmond Living Forgotten Realms Epic Writing Director
I think both, Diseases and Curses should be tracked by a story award style certificate that the player must take, not only would it show when and what the disease or curse is listed but it could have all of the different stages of the disease listed so that as the conditions change from adventure to adventure the participating Dm's can sign off on the change, it might be worth a (small) xp award in just "getting rid of the curse/disease" if so it would entice players to keep better track of the certificate, if they can complete it and turn it in for a 50XP bonus to thier next adventure (or whatever teh xp bonus be) you may even be able to fit such a tracking certificate right on the story award itself as one of the 3 rewards. but i must agree that if all i gotta do to be undiseased and possibly uncursed (when we start getting curses in LFR) is to wait out the adventure then just say "my characer rests for 6 months while he recovers" takes away from the penalty of being cursed or diseased, plus being a player i would much rather role-play out the character going through the hardships of his disease trying to find cures than to just say ok the modules over so before i start the next one I am all better.
The disease progression should be played out at the table. Assume several extended rests happen, until the disease is cured naturally, until it reaches its final state, or until it is cured with a ritual or power. If it reaches final effect, those effects remain until the disease is cured, even between adventures.

I don't see that happening myself. Often games run longer then the alloted 4 hours so the DM is going to be rushed. Something else that often happens is that the DM will say "you're diseased, remind me at the end of the module", then 3 hours later both DM and player have forgotten and so the game ends with the character technically diseased, but everyone forgetting the character was diseased so they get away with a free cure.

Mods really need to have in big bold letters on the page that lists bundles RESOLVE ANY DISEASED CHARACTERS!!!! because otherwise it just isn't going to happen with any degree of regularity. Also the MM and DMG diseases have been Errata'd since they were published, so mods need to either remind DMs of this* or include the correct version of the disease in the mod itself.

* Diseases haven't been popping up often enough for DMs to remember the errata'd rules by themselves.
Of course... with no judge sign off, etc., having a disease continue from mod to mod would be totally based on the honor system.

This is why I have just hand-waved diseases and said, "You're cured" at the end of adventures where it's an issue. It's not worth arguing with meta-gamey players that assert their character's Endurance "is high anyway." Or, they simply state the obvious that disease in LFR is pretty silly because there is no guidance on handling it between adventures.

But, seeing this discussion compels me to be more firm and ask affected players if they want to resolve it with rolls or gold at the table at the end of an adventure or let them take it to the next one. The latter brings us back to Dragon9's above comment, though.

-------- Don (Greyson) --------

Non-smoker, White, Non-golfer, U.S.-American

I was just thinking, that Diseases and Curses should be tracked by Story awards because in a way they are small quests, (quest to become free of them) anyone remember a little adventure called "Curse of the Azure Bonds?" the dieases and or curses should be one of the 3 available story rewards on the form, the form will have each different stage of the disease listed with a line for a dm to sign off on, when all stages have been signed off the disseas/curse is cured and a small amount of XP can be awarded for the troubles in gaining this condition as a small or major quest (depending on the saverity of the disease/curse.)

i think this would be very easy to do and keep track of by offering the quest xp reward it would also supply players with incentive on not just Going the route of "DM saying your healed at the end of the mod" because of the Xp reward for completing the healing process.
Diseases are tough. They just aren't a suitable mechanic for a living game.

In a home campaign, they properly play out and become a true story for your PC.

In a living campaign, the disease will almost always fail to have an impact on that mod. Thus, while the disease is part of the difficulty/challenge/XP of the monster issuing it, it does nothing for that mod's difficulty/challenge.

Instead, you end up with an end of mod effect you may truly hate (even making you unplayable for the next mod, or at least much poorer) or one that just ate up time when you rolled all those dice.

I would rather see that you do not track diseases at all in LFR.

But, for now, I'll run with the rules we have, which is to resolve at the end of the mod. Those are the rules.

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In truth, part of me would prefer if diseases for LFR were triggered every short rest but were automatically cured at the end of the module.
Keith Richmond Living Forgotten Realms Epic Writing Director
In truth, part of me would prefer if diseases for LFR were triggered every short rest but were automatically cured at the end of the module.

I think that's a fair compromise for LFR. It means that the disease has an effect within the mod (where I honestly think it should have a result) without either negating the gold reward (especially potent at lower levels) or hindering your character for future mods.
Diseases are tough. They just aren't a suitable mechanic for a living game.

In a home campaign, they properly play out and become a true story for your PC.

In a living campaign, the disease will almost always fail to have an impact on that mod. Thus, while the disease is part of the difficulty/challenge/XP of the monster issuing it, it does nothing for that mod's difficulty/challenge.

Instead, you end up with an end of mod effect you may truly hate (even making you unplayable for the next mod, or at least much poorer) or one that just ate up time when you rolled all those dice.

I would rather see that you do not track diseases at all in LFR.

But, for now, I'll run with the rules we have, which is to resolve at the end of the mod. Those are the rules.

The disease progression should be played out at the table. Assume several extended rests happen, until the disease is cured naturally, until it reaches its final state, or until it is cured with a ritual or power. If it reaches final effect, those effects remain until the disease is cured, even between adventures.
PCs may purchase a cure disease ritual for 180gp (20% above cost) or have another PC cast it at cost. The PCs may share the cost.

Shawn
LFR Global Admin

my interpritation of this to means that if by the end of the adventure your unable to cure the disease your have to keep track of it's effects for your next module. and continue the curing process of this for the next module as well.

Honestly If we dont keep track of diseases they should be banned from mods. there is no threat if there is no long term consequence and 90% of Disease is the threat of long term consequence, so to take away the consequence makes them worthless as a game mechanic (within our living campaigns)
my interpritation of this to means that if by the end of the adventure your unable to cure the disease your have to keep track of it's effects for your next module. and continue the curing process of this for the next module as well.

Honestly If we dont keep track of diseases they should be banned from mods. there is no threat if there is no long term consequence and 90% of Disease is the threat of long term consequence, so to take away the consequence makes them worthless as a game mechanic (within our living campaigns)

So, track it, then. Any honest player will track it. Any dishonest player will "forget" to track it. It is no different than rewards. I could "conveniently lose" my "Attention of Dark Powers" reward. I won't, because I am an honest player. It comes down to trusting players. And, if you aren't willing to trust, then nothing you can implement will solve the problem, because if someone is willing to cheat, then just about any form of documentation can be gotten around.

-SYB
Honestly If we dont keep track of diseases they should be banned from mods.

I think tweaking them so in LFR they require saves on short rests as opposed to extended rests would be a fair trade. You get the effects of the disease without the paperwork hassle.

So, track it, then. Any honest player will track it. Any dishonest player will "forget" to track it.

And honest players will forget to track it. Because it has little to no short-term effects, it isn't going to be something people will normally remember. IMO the problem isn't the dishonest player, but the honest player who genuinely forgets. I can see how that would lead to disgruntlement and animosity among other players.
And honest players will forget to track it. Because it has little to no short-term effects, it isn't going to be something people will normally remember. IMO the problem isn't the dishonest player, but the honest player who genuinely forgets. I can see how that would lead to disgruntlement and animosity among other players.

Funny. In my experience, when an honest player forgets something like that, they are given a light ribbing, a gentle reminder, and there are no hard feelings. Generally, the honest player feels worse about it than other players at the table. And, generally, the honest player will go out of his way to fix the mistake or to not make the mistake next time (like writing DISEASE on the top of his character sheet).

It is the dishonest player who I have seen lead to disgruntlement and animosity almost every time.

-SYB
The answer Shawn gave back in November is still the official answer on how LFR handles resolution of diseases. Mr Tulach has not forgotten the need to document the procedure and is getting closer to doing an update to the LFR Adventure template. It will be included with that update.

The process does not take long, a few rolls of dice usually pushes the PC towards either cured or final stage.

Keith
Keith Hoffman LFR Writing Director for Waterdeep
Was how to handle disease ever updated anywhere? CCG? LFR writing guidelines? another post? Thanks.
Here is the boilerplate from the most current mod I can find:

Diseases: Diseases take hold of a character and last until they are cured or they reach their final state. Normally, a PC makes an Endurance check after each extended rest to see if the disease improves, worsens, or maintains its current condition. At the end of the adventure, any character suffering from a disease must resolve the disease to either its cure or final state, using the necessary number of extended rests to do so. Other characters adventuring with the PC may decide to aid the afflicted character during this time. If a disease reaches its final state and the PC can get a Cure Disease ritual cast (and pay the appropriate costs), they may do so.

So, resolve it at the end of the mod seems to be the standing ruling. I'm not sure if there is anything else you were looking for.
Herrbard a.k.a. Dan Erbacher Old, bald and tired.
Here is the boilerplate from the most current mod I can find:

Diseases: Diseases take hold of a character and last until they are cured or they reach their final state. Normally, a PC makes an Endurance check after each extended rest to see if the disease improves, worsens, or maintains its current condition. At the end of the adventure, any character suffering from a disease must resolve the disease to either its cure or final state, using the necessary number of extended rests to do so. Other characters adventuring with the PC may decide to aid the afflicted character during this time. If a disease reaches its final state and the PC can get a Cure Disease ritual cast (and pay the appropriate costs), they may do so.

So, resolve it at the end of the mod seems to be the standing ruling. I'm not sure if there is anything else you were looking for.



Most people I know think you can 'take 10' on your check, making it trivial. If not, there are often PCs in the party with heal - likewise if you allow 'taking 10' on the heal check it also makes diseases trivial.

Is this allowed?
Most people I know think you can 'take 10' on your check, making it trivial. If not, there are often PCs in the party with heal - likewise if you allow 'taking 10' on the heal check it also makes diseases trivial.

Is this allowed?



Not in my games.  Taking 10 is allowed for "mundane tasks."  In the description of Taking 10 in the PH, the wording is vague, but for me the implication is that trying to get rid of a disease is not a mundane task.  It has very real and potentially very dire in-game consequences.  This is not a campaign ruling, of course: just how I play it.


Not in my games.  Taking 10 is allowed for "mundane tasks."  In the description of Taking 10 in the PH, the wording is vague, but for me the implication is that trying to get rid of a disease is not a mundane task.  It has very real and potentially very dire in-game consequences.  This is not a campaign ruling, of course: just how I play it.



That's a somewhat idiosyncratic view.  A "mundane task" is only one of the situations in which taking 10 is allowed, and pretty much by definition, any non-pointless skill check will have in-game consequences.

"When you’re not in a rush, not being threatened or distracted (when you’re outside an encounter), and when you’re dealing with a mundane task, you can choose to take 10" (PH, p. 179).

I would tend to think that treating a disease or trying to shake one off is almost the textbook definition of being outside an encounter and not in a rush, being threatened or distracted.  If this doesn't qualify for taking 10, it is tough to imagine what would.

"When you’re not in a rush, not being threatened or distracted (when you’re outside an encounter), and when you’re dealing with a mundane task, you can choose to take 10" (PH, p. 179).

I would tend to think that treating a disease or trying to shake one off is almost the textbook definition of being outside an encounter and not in a rush, being threatened or distracted.  If this doesn't qualify for taking 10, it is tough to imagine what would.


So you are saying that the disease poses no threat? Sorry, but I have to disagree with you on that.

Herrbard a.k.a. Dan Erbacher Old, bald and tired.
That's a somewhat idiosyncratic view.  A "mundane task" is only one of the situations in which taking 10 is allowed, and pretty much by definition, any non-pointless skill check will have in-game consequences.

"When you’re not in a rush, not being threatened or distracted (when you’re outside an encounter), and when you’re dealing with a mundane task, you can choose to take 10" (PH, p. 179).



But your quote uses "and", meaning it's got to be all three of those things to qualify as something for which you can take 10.

You can take 10 on simple stuff like climbing ladders (athletics) or applying a bandage (heal) that would otherwise require a check during combat or other distracting scenario.
Does Death (and the raise dead/death charity clause) cure a disease? I just want to point out that it is conceivable that a character "falls upon misfortune" after the last encounter because of the disease, and thus invokes death charity clause. This could be a potential abuse.



A PC may not take 10 on a disease check
No death doesn't cure a disease the charactor is dead but still capable of passing the disease on to others, Pages 49-50 of the DMG clearly states a Disease is divided in to five tracks 

Cure:



Improve:



Maintain:



Worsen:



Final State:



When you reach the right edge of the



track, the final state of the disease takes effect. Once



the disease is in its final state, you no longer make



Endurance checks to improve. Often, the only way



to recover from the final state is through the Cure



Disease ritual.


So if one dies they comback with the disease in the Final State if the Final State is death then the charactor comes back in the worsen condition . Of course some DMs might say that since the PC is dead the disease has run it course and the PC is no longer infected. But I know for a fact the French would load catapults full of diseased bodies ranging from small pox, to anthrax ,and black death. Then once a person behind the castle wall got the disease the French would wait for everyone else to die, walk straight in to the empty castle, and plant their flag.    
A disease must be cured at the end of the adventure in which the player contracted the disease

So you are saying that the disease poses no threat? Sorry, but I have to disagree with you on that.




The person with the disease is the one being threatened, not the person making the heal check...
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