Significance of regions

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What is the significance of living in a particular region. I live in the Southeast U.S. or "Aglarond", but what does that mean really? Do I get a T-shirt?
"I live in Algarond and all I got was this lousy T-shirt" ???
Hmmm. Needs work.
Seriously, there is currently no information on benefits for 'in region' play (whether we are talking real-world or in-game).
Presently, the regions are there for administrative purposes only.
Presently, the regions are there for administrative purposes only.

Presently, huh? Hmmmm....that's a new word in this type of reply from you, isn't it?

"Clams got legs! Clams got legs!"

David
Not really. Just trying to be as accurate as possible. In terms of regional and core adventures, you can play any of them anywhere, regardless of the region of the adventure or the region you are playing in. But that doesn't mean regions won't have other uses. Just right now they are to help administer the campaign more easily.
Shawn, do you and the other admins envisage that much/most of the development of a region will come from with it?

By which I suppose I mean so you think that most authors will be from in-region, and do you think that players will get attached to 'their' region in terms of IC discussions (perhaps on forums or lists) etc?

Running D&D Adventurers League events in Sheffield, UK from August. Contact me for more details.

I can only speak for myself here. As a Triad member for Keoland in LG, I think the regional aspect of LG was wonderful for empowering a small number of people to contribute to the campaign. However, this same regionalism that empowered some completely alienated many others. Many, many people I talked to would have played LG, but they disliked their region and had very few opportunities to play outside of it.

I love the idea that people can play adventures from whatever region tickles their fancy. I believe that people will still be able to contribute to the campaign (and the regions) through various mediums--the only difference is they will get to choose which region they want to support, and they will be able to enjoy the fruits of that support more easily.

I think the only thing that should limit anyone's capacity to contribute to a region is their talent and willingness to put in the time. However, each set of regional administrators are free to have their own criteria for choosing adventure authors and other "support staff."

Shawn
The main advantage of author in-region is logistics: meeting face to face with an author is very helpful - for that reason it is also easier to recruit from people in your area.
However I do not really care where someone is from as long as they meet deadlines, have good ideas, can follow instructions, and, very important: are easy to reach (i.e. answer their email). One of the worst authors imo are not the ones with bad grammar, but the ones you just can't get a reply from.

Gomez
We need to find a way to get that "regional pride" from Greyhawk without the isolationism... Any ideas of how we can have our cake and eat it too?
One idea I thought of was to make families of PCs, and have them based in a region.
I just proposed an idea for a Crinti family in the East Rift on that region's mailinglist. Will see what reactions are (the family is not exactly mainstream) - if they don't totally kill the idea I'll post it here too.

Another family I was thinking of was a gnome family. The Yummonbrock family of gnomes, who trade in all kinds of things - especially magic. The family has a happy cheery demeanor, and a bit naive - able tot entirely miss the intentions of people they meet and assume that everyone has te best of intentions at heart. They also have a reputation of creating magic items that totally fail (or fail at crucial moments).
They are from Lantan (Nelanther isles), but now reside in Baldur's Gate.

Gomez,
who has a gnome card and isn't afraid to use it...
One idea I thought of was to make families of PCs, and have them based in a region.
I just proposed an idea for a Crinti family in the East Rift on that region's mailinglist. Will see what reactions are (the family is not exactly mainstream) - if they don't totally kill the idea I'll post it here too.

Another family I was thinking of was a gnome family. The Yummonbrock family of gnomes, who trade in all kinds of things - especially magic. The family has a happy cheery demeanor, and a bit naive - able tot entirely miss the intentions of people they meet and assume that everyone has te best of intentions at heart. They also have a reputation of creating magic items that totally fail (or fail at crucial moments).
They are from Lantan (Nelanther isles), but now reside in Baldur's Gate.

Gomez,
who has a gnome card and isn't afraid to use it...

Not a bad idea. Most of my characters will be the Greycastle's. They originate from a group of PC's I ran for a series of Forgotten Realms campaigns back in 3.0. They mostly ended up Harpers. I have my family tree all gen'ed up (just need to find it) to show where the descendents of those three brothers are after the Spellplague. Most are in Cormyr and the Dales. Some arn't even called Greycastle anymore. Hell, a few arn't even human (half-elf and genasi) anymore.

They just may be the sole source I pull new PCs from. Well, them and the Dahast family of elves/half-elves/elfkin.
Hmm, interesting. Perhaps I'll make three "brothers". One human, one elf, and one hal-elf. The human and elf could be step-brothers.
Hmm, interesting. Perhaps I'll make three "brothers". One human, one elf, and one hal-elf. The human and elf could be step-brothers.

Yeah, I knew a half-elf and a half-orc who were half brothers. Daddy got around.
Hmm, interesting. Perhaps I'll make three "brothers". One human, one elf, and one hal-elf. The human and elf could be step-brothers.

The suggestions is not so much that 'you' make a family, but 'we' make a family - i.o.w. different players with characters from the same family or clan.
The suggestions is not so much that 'you' make a family, but 'we' make a family - i.o.w. different players with characters from the same family or clan.

Yeah, kinda like the Lee family of halflings that were scattered across the Flanaess, IIRC. Deft Lee comes to mind. Forget how many of them there were, but they sure cropped up everywhere and in all lines of work.
Yes, though you could limit it to a region.
Here is the Huruafair family I proposed for use in East Rift (moved it to another thread):

http://forums.gleemax.com/showthread.php?t=1046570
Adventuring companies or the like might be more practical than families, as it doesn't influence name generation and doesn't imply a shared heritage.
D&D rules were never meant to exist without the presence of a DM. RAW is a lie.

I'm still not clear on this.
If any player/GM can play/run any adventure from any region in any region, what's the point of equating LFR geography to real-world geography?

I live in New York State...LFR says that's Corymr...but my PC could call Waterdeep, or Thay, or where-ever home...and my PC could just as easily adventure in any other region...all while I, the player, never leave New York State. And, that's kinda cool...but it seems contrary to equating the game world with the real world.

Shawn has said that it's an administrative-thing...but not much more. Is there anything more that could be added? Will the adventure authors be drawn only from the real-world regions? I.e. If I were to endevor to write an LFR adventure, it would have to be for Cormyr?

I'm still not clear on this.
If any player/GM can play/run any adventure from any region in any region, what's the point of equating LFR geography to real-world geography?

I live in New York State...LFR says that's Corymr...but my PC could call Waterdeep, or Thay, or where-ever home...and my PC could just as easily adventure in any other region...all while I, the player, never leave New York State. And, that's kinda cool...but it seems contrary to equating the game world with the real world.

Shawn has said that it's an administrative-thing...but not much more. Is there anything more that could be added? Will the adventure authors be drawn only from the real-world regions? I.e. If I were to endevor to write an LFR adventure, it would have to be for Cormyr?

There have been mentions made of trying to find ways to reward players for playing in their local region (IE - if you play in Cormyr modules).

Last I heard this was still an idea they were tossing about, but nothing has been confirmed/denied yet. At this point I imagine we'll have to wait for the LFR Appendix to the CCG to know for sure.
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There have been mentions made of trying to find ways to reward players for playing in their local region (IE - if you play in Cormyr modules).

Actually, so far, what most people talked about was rewarding *characters* for playing in their own (origin) region.
That said, currently we have no news on either.
Actually, so far, what most people talked about was rewarding *characters* for playing in their own (origin) region.
That said, currently we have no news on either.

Semantics
(also known as "good catch, but I don't wanna admit it")
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I get the impression that if you want to be a volunteer (triad?) then it will have to be for Cormyr. If you write a module then it is probably somewhat easier for you to do it in Cormyr where you have a good chance of knowing/meeting the people you have to work with on it (though with e-mail that needn't be a terribly big issue).
Are interactives gone for LFR?
I can only imagine interactives on a regional basis, and participating in them would be at least one reward for having a regional character.
Are interactives gone for LFR?
I can only imagine interactives on a regional basis, and participating in them would be at least one reward for having a regional character.

Indications are that there will be interactives. But, they could be core or regional. Just because they are set in a particular local says nothing about where they can be played. I think they require a large venue, such as a con, for play, but a con in Berlin could host an interactive in Waterdeep.

Interactives held a cons in the appropriate real-world region do seem well suited for special benefits to encourage regional play, but I don't see any indication that interractives will be regionally restricted.