1001 Common Structures in a Village/Town/City

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This is the revamped version of the old thread, started with some sort of planning.

Ever had trouble thinking of random buildings for an urban setting? Ever just drawn some rectangular shapes and said 'OK, that's a building' without bothering to explain it? Ever wonder just what sorts of structures a particular setting has? Ever wondered what sort of mischief you could turn up in a city?

Here's a nice big list to answer any of those questions.

Primary Factors of Settlement Building
Each of the following factors should be an important consideration for developing a settlement. This is just a summary, however. Click each subject for additional details (or scroll down)

Size - The biggest factor in building a settlement is deciding what size it should be, both in terms of population, land mass, and economic power. How wealthy is the upper class? Is it a sprawling cityscape, or a maze-like ancient city, like those found in Europe? Size is the primary factor in determining what sorts of structures can be found.

Location - Location is important as well. Most settlements grow from small towns due to their importance. This can be for any number of reasons, but geographical location is perhaps the most important.

Composition - What is the settlement's primary purpose? Is it a logging town? An academic center? A military outpost? Does your city have a dock? Is it landlocked? Is it in a northern continent? If so, it may need some HUGE storage warehouses, to store food for the winter.
Composition is important for setting the tone, and adding subtle details like that.


Notes
This is a compilation, with lots of people who helped. Some were online, posting links and giving feedback. Some were offline, who mentioned a story or historical factoid, which reminded me of another tidbit. Thanks to anyone who helps!

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Settlement Size



As mentioned, settlement size is probably the most important factor for creating random buildings. Depending on the size of the settlement, the frequency of each structure can vary greatly; A city can have dozens of blacksmiths, while a village may not have one at all.

Village
Population: under 1000 according to DMG, I say 500 is more reasonable.
Generally just a collection of small houses and some other minor buildings. Everything is probably made of wood, thatch, and dirt floors. Villages *may* have a wooden palisade, but nothing more than that. A wall of cultivated briars or something may be more likely. Villages may also build their structures close together and add some brick walls between the buildings in an attempt to fortify things a bit.
Mufflon says: Villages in feudal settings would only rarely, if ever, have palisades or other such fortifications. In the middle ages it was common practice to flee to the keep held by the local lord should the village come under attack.

Villages should have a very communal feel, and probably don't actually use currency too much. A bartering system may be more common here, and they would probably let adventurers sleep in a hay loft for free, or in exchange for helping them with some minor things. Larger villages would probably have an inn or two, especially if near a major road, but isolated farming communities probably wouldn't.

Magic items in a village would generally be small trinkets or baubles, and would be considered family heirlooms.
Many of the tradesman jobs found in a Town or City would be performed by the village members, though the results would probably be far more utilitarian. Examples include a tanner, basket weaver, woodworker, and a poleturner. These activities would only be needed occasionally in a village, but a town would be large enough to support the occupation as an independent affair.



Town
Population: 1000 to 10,000 people, according to DMG. I would say 500 to 3000 would be more reasonable.
Towns may have some cobbled streets, especially if near a source of stone. Towns tend to have more niche structures, and probably an actual government, rather than "Bill's in charge."

Towns probably have a wall around them, especially if monsters are frequent nearby. For that matter, towns tend to develop around strategically important locations, such as major crossroads, natural resources, or tactically important locations (such as a narrow pass in the mountain chains)

Many buildings may be stone, and clay roofs may be quite common as well. Multi-story buildings would start to emerge. Glass windows may start to emerge as well, especially if the town houses a glassblower.



City
Population: Up to 25,000 or more.
Cities are big, and would almost always have a wall of some kind, especially around the inner city, though the city would often outgrow this wall as the years go by. This wall would often be made of stone, and possibly be magically reinforced. Cities also have a clearly defined class system, either by design or by natural occurrence. A well-trained militia or guard force would be common.
Cities would also begin to sell magic weapons in high numbers, at least at lower levels, though the price would remain high. Magic items would probably be common among the nobility, though random trinkets may be found among the commoners as well.
Cities are dependent on neighboring towns for resources, especially food, though they would also be able to export finery. Their size would be able to sustain highly-trained and highly-talented craftsmen.

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Settlement Location



Most important settlements grew because of proximity to an important geographical feature.

Resource Proximity - An important resource is found nearby, and this settlement has grown around accessing this resource.

Minerals
Agricultural Land (fertile land, suitable geography)
Building Material (lumber, stone)
Labor
Water
Wind


Environmental Transition - This is where the heroes inevitably stock up on the proper gear for the next leg of the voyage. Resources could include clothes, climbing gear, magical items, and other gear. In some cases, it may be necessary to acquire transportation, including loading/unloading a ship of some kind.

Forest-Tundra
Ocean-Coast
Desert-Plain
Foothills-Mountains
Lake-Lakeside


Connectivity of Routes - Ever notice how major roads often intersect at major cities? That's not a coincidence. Crossroads are an important geographical feature.

River Crossing/ Crossroads
River Branch/Fork in Road
Stop Over/Rest Stop


Defensible Position

****/Sea Wall
Mound
Hill
Mountain
River bend
Gorge/Pass

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Settlement Composition or Function



Another factor to consider is the composition, or function of each location. This is especially important in cities, and mildly important in towns.

By composition I mean the structure, layout, and overall design of the city.
By function I mean the basic purpose of the settlement

Compare building in a Germanic style village to those of an Asian style or Greek. It's possible to mix a little but adding that kind of flair to a town is another factor to consider. Is the town all cut stonemasonry or mud bricks? Are buildings plastered or simple timber structures? Do the local religions effect the makeup heavily or do they just have a marble church in the middle of mud huts? In a city setting, are the streets cobble stones or pressed gravel? Alleyways are unlikely to be as well-maintained as the main roads are.

The race making up the majority of the city will have a significant impact on it's overall design.


City Composition Archetypes

The Fortress - Surrounded by high walls, and probably has laws preventing people from building right next to the wall. Enchantments to sense powerful magic or tunneling under the wall may also be around.
Fortresses are most likely found defending important economic centers and located in naturally defensible locations such as high spots or a river crossing.
Fortresses are most likely to have several layers of defenses. Many buildings in a fortress would have flat roofs, so defenders could climb on top and rain archer fire on invaders. Major roads would cut wide gaps between each city block (rather than lots of meandering paths). This way, if a single block is overtaken, defenders can simply remove the planks/bridge to those rooftops and continue the defense.
Perhaps each major square has magic stone walls that sink into the ground (merging with the road) during peace time, but erupt from the ground to stop invaders from simply walking around. Infiltrators would still slip through, but it would force the invaders to split up (inviting a massacre), or spend time breaking down the wall, giving the defenders more time to regain control of the situation.

The Metropolis - After many, many years of relative peace, this city has outgrown the limited space it has available. Think of New York City. Everything is built on top of everything else. Buildings tend to grow up, not out. Everything is more expensive, because of the competition for space. Depending on the situation, the city may have started growing down, presenting a whole new set of problems.
Perhaps the metropolis has a form of public transportation, such as short-range teleportation circles or a canal system full of enchanted (driverless) boats, kind of like taxis.
In a high-magic situation, flying chariots may deliver the upper class to their destination.

Steeltown - Located next to an important resource, such as a mine or harbor, this city has a very industrial feel. While everything is in good condition, many of the buildings are utilitarian. Entire blocks may be taken over by warehouses or factories. Instead of favoring a craftsman trade, this city focuses on making large items. Steeltown is experiencing an industrial revolution.

Vegas - The opposite of steeltown, this settlement has become popular for it's carefree lifestyle. Perhaps nestled in a peaceful valley, this town is quite safe from overt threats, but may have a (nasty) vein of corruption.
Everything is flashy, gaudy, and over the top.

Enlightenment - This city had it's roots in the study of arcane magic, or something. It has a very intellectual culture. Perhaps it's the result of a powerful wizard's university, or perhaps it grew around a supernatural phenomenon that naturally attracted the curious in nature. Examples of this include waterfalls that fall up, floating rocks, temporal phenomenon, Weird Stuff Happening (the Bermuda Triangle, only smaller in scale), or maybe a weird glitch in space-time that lets astronomers see into other dimensions.

Zealous r We - A city with a highly religious atmosphere, possibly at the base of your world's Mt Olympus.



City Function Archetypes

Market - A centralized community focused on the collection and distribution of local produce. This type of community can function in isolation while access to a communication network is vital for the export of surplus produce.
Prerequisite: Resource (Agricultural Land/Labour).

Industrial - A community concerned primarily with the processing of raw materials into manufactured goods. Some will specialize in a single end-product. They have access to the resources necessary to process raw materials including labour, power (water for mills). Industrial communities require a communication network to function.
Prerequisite: Resource (Minerals/Labour/Water/Wind); Network (Road/River).

Commercial - A community involved in trade and financial activities (banking and money lending). They do not require traded produce to pass through the town and may be sophisticated enough to deal in document based trade and financial transactions. A communication network is critical to the survival of this community.
Prerequisite: Node, Nexus (Road/River).

Mining - This is involved in the extraction of minerals. It will be located where the minerals are and that can be anywhere. It requires access to a communication network.
Prerequisite: Network (River/Road), Resource (Mineral/Labour).

Administrative - This is the seat of government, whether the capital city or a local administration. This community will sit at a centre of a provincial or national communication network.
Prerequisite: Node or Nexus (River/Road).

Cultural/Education - These are centered on universities and colleges. They are centers of learning and have a selection of appropriate crafts to support the development, recording, and storage of information. There is some need for access to a communication network.
Prerequisite: Network, Nexus, Node (River/Road).

Ecclesiastical - Religious centers drawing pilgrimage, or housing religious associations or shrines. These require access to a communication network.
Prerequisite: Network, Nexus, Node (River/Road).

Primary Residence – This is the residence of a Ruler (Whether President, Emperor, King, Duke or Baron). It is a palace or castle and requires some access to a communication network.
Prerequisite: Any Location.

Resorts – Baths, recreational districts, retreats. They require a favorable geographical location that provides both safety and healing. Resorts function on a communication network.
Prerequisite: Coast, Hill, Network (Road/River).

Port – Located on the coast as a fishing community, a center of sea trade and travel or located on a river for the movement of goods and people by river. A port requires communication networks that extend over water and land.
Prerequisite: Environmental Transition (Coast); Pit-stop, node, nexus (River/road); Defensible Position (Lakeside).

Residential - These are designed to provide urban peoples with housing away from polluted, corrupted, or expensive urban centres. This specialization requires a second specialized centre in close proximity.
Prerequisite: Network, node, nexus (Road/river).

Dispersed – Isolated independent farms with a selection of skills necessary to support their independent nature. There is little social interaction.
Prerequisite: Exploitable Resource (Agricultural Land), Defensible Position (Mound).

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Village Structures



Dispersed Holdings & Residential
Barn - Farms would generally have a barn for storing their tools, hay, and for housing the animals.
Farm - Villages will be surrounded by farm fields. Each farm would probably specialize in one or two crops or animals, but still grow enough other things for personal use.
Hovel/Hut - A one or two room structure for living in. Probably has a chimney/stove and a sleeping chamber.
Root Cellar - Where community members store their crops and stuff. By storing the items underground, they remain cold and (mostly) fresh. Larger villages may have several, and prosperous families may have a small personal root cellar as well.
Smokehouse - Sometimes a family would have one, but village residents may share.
Well - Every village would need a well or stream to get their water from
"Wise Woman" - Probably works from home, heals people's afflictions. Probably full of random superstitions and a couple of true nuggets of knowledge. Probably knows of and grows some herbs, but these would be on the low end of effectiveness, only curing mundane (non-magical) ailments.


Local Market
Granary - A large silo, for holding grain (commonly called Silos today)
Store/Shop - Sells assorted items, traveling gear, and food. Probably near the center of village.

Industry
Blacksmith's - Every village should have a blacksmith, even if he's only part-time
Mill - Again, nearly every village would have a windmill or water mill to grind up the wheat
Sawmill - Where people take trees to be cut into lumber. Many sawmills were powered by water, but manpower or beasts of burden could be used in the absence of a large river.

Commercial
Tavern/Restaurant/Inn - All-in-one building, possibly the local shop as well. In especially remote locations, this may just be someone with an extra room to their house, or another function of the Town Hall.

Mining
Quarry - If a source of stone is handy, the village may build a quarry. In that case, buildings (especially public ones) may be built out of stone.

Administrative
Town Hall - Probably a multifunction building where meetings are held. Quite possibly held in the church, or another public building.

Culture & Education
Parade Field - Small villages wouldn't have an active musician's guild, but there might be a chior. Simple instruments (ocarinas and carved reeds come to mind) might be present.

Ecclesiastical
Church - Church would probably be held in a small building or perhaps at someone's house. Larger villages would probably have a dedicated town hall and use it for both purposes.
Shrine - A small shrine to a particular deity, or group of deities. Perhaps a private wing of the Town Hall or Inn, if there is no church.

Nobility
Elders - Villages probably wouldn't have any nobility living there, but perhaps a family is especially respected for their Elder status.

Public Service
Graveyard - A small family gravesite, or village graveyard. Would probably be a short distance outside the village, especially if locals are concerned about necromancers. Perhaps the village believes in cremation.

Port & Aquatic
Dock - A small fishing village would have a small, communal dock.


Types of Farms


Animals*
Chickens - Chickens were quite common and easy to raise, but some farms probably specialized in them...
Cows - Milk, beef, cattle
Goats - Milk, meat. More adaptable than cattle.
Horses - Horse breeding was a very important job
Oxen - Used to pull very heavy wagons
Pigs - Pork
Sheep - Wool

Hounds - Trained dogs were invaluable to farmers and such. They keep away most vermin, and are useful for hunting. Different dog breeds have different uses. For example, small dogs are useful in an urban setting to keep away rats, but don't take up much room. Country farms would probably prefer larger dogs, especially those that can hold their own against low-level monsters (goblins).

ScrewySqrl says: Most herd animals are not grown on farms until at least the 15th century. Sheep and goats, especially, but in lesser extents beef cattle and horses are tended by nomads who bring the animals to a city for trade.


Ponds
fowl and fish



Field Crops
Barley - Makes beer
Beans
Corn - Corn was actually in the new world (Americas) on Earth, but perhaps your plane has it?
Potatoes
Rice - Another biggie. Asian cultures practically used this in place of wheat.
Wheat - Probably the number one crop. Used to make bread.


Orchards
Apples
Bananas?
Grapes - Makes wine
Oranges
Olives - Olives are food, a flavor enhancement, a source of light and mechanical lubrication. CRITICALLY important to any Mediterranean culture

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Town Structures



Dispersed Holdings & Residential
Farms - A town would be surrounded by farms for quite a distance. When trouble brews, the farmers seek safety inside the town walls.
Houses - Single family or multiple family structures. Imagine a small suburb home. Now imagine it half that size, and you are probably about right. Family members would often share a bed or at least a room. Dedicated rooms were a luxury, so a simple 2-4 room building would be common.
Plantation - Essentially a large farm, probably using slaves/servants/peasants/monsters as labor. Plantation owners would probably high-middle class or minor nobles.

Local Market
Black Market - So you want something... special, eh? Suppose I know a guy...
Coldhouse - A larger version of an icebox, for storing perishables. Quite possibly magicked.
Graintower - Used to store grain.
Marketplace - Possibly a set location for selling goods, sometimes just vendor carts at the side of the road. Cities would probably have dedicated market districts, such as a fish market and a farmer's market.
Merchant Post - Merchant posts would collect food and other goods sold in nearby villages and arrange for caravans to be sent out to other towns and cities. Merchants may also hire low-level adventurers for protection.
Warehouse - Used to store various goods in, warehouses may take up an entire block.

Industry
Basket Weaver - Makes things out of reeds, especially baskets. Villages may do this on the side, but a town would probably have an expert. Random fact: wicker baskets can be made watertight!
Brewer - Makes the world's favorite beverage. Water was often unsafe to drank in the medieval ages, so everyone drank wine and beer. I would argue that the presence of magic would make sanitizing water a snap, but that still may not be feasible in towns.
Butcher - Farmers probably butcher their own meat, but a town may have a butcher. Butchers would need a icebox, an underground cellar packed with ice to keep things cold. Salting is also an option. Cities may have task mages capable of enchanting the icebox with a Cold spell.
Cobbler - Makes or repairs shoes. Shoes were generally made of leather, but they sometimes had wooden soles.
Cooper - Makes barrels. Barrels would have been everywhere, used for shipping practically everything. May want to be near a blacksmith to make the steel rings. Possibly maker of coffins and other things. (see post 13 & 14 for details)
Chandler - Makes candles, sells them at market. Candles are made out of beeswax and/or animal fat. Possibly smelly if latter, and on outskirts/downwind side of town.
Glassblower - Makes glassware and windows out of sand. Needs a blast furnace. May be in conflict with potter.
Mine - Towns tend to spring up around important terrain features. A mine would be one example of such feature. Mines provide an excellent source of raw materials for local workers. Raw material can also be refined or exported to another location.
Potter - Makes clay pots for general purpose use. May also make bricks, though that was more of an untrained task IIRC. Needs a kiln. May be in conflict with glass blower.
Specialist Shops - Town Blacksmiths would begin to specialize in one industry. Sword smiths and armor smiths may begin to emerge. Shops may begin to sell only a speciffic category of items (such as spears or crossbows), and magic items may begin to show up, though they would be highly expensive.
Tanner - Takes leather/hide and cures it using various caustic & smelly chemicals.
Winery - A town may have a winery to make wine at. Wine needs to be stored underground and let cure for many years, so a warehouse nearby would be important.
Woodworker - In a small town, the construction of furniture and other devices would begin to increase in demand.

Commercial
Apartment - High frequency in Cities, perhaps one or two in a town.
Inn - Towns would have an inn, possibly doubling as a diner in smaller locations. Stables would be nearby.
Stable - Any town with an inn is going to have a stable, probably owned by the innkeeper. Cities may have independent stables, sort of like a car parking garage.
Tavern - Most towns would likely have a tavern, especially if the Inn doesn't have a large common room.

Mining
Quarry
mine carts - some way to ship the resources.

Administrative
Council Office
Customs House - Collects customs, of course!
Guard Room - Towns will probably have an active guard duty of some kind, though it may not be much more than 3-5 guys with some decent armor. A militia would also be a common occurrence.
Guard Tower - Even a town with meager defenses will likely have a high guard tower where a keen-eyed teen could watch for dangers on the horizon.
Notice Board - A posting of advertisements, including wanted signs, announcements, and other sorts of things.
Town Hall - Basically a big meeting hall, probably with 2-3 rooms in moderate towns. Villagers probably meet at someone's house.
Outpost - A small fortress about half a day's ride from the village.

Culture & Education
Arena - Perhaps small sports activities would take place here.
Performing Inn - An inn or tavern with a small stage for singers/performers
Street Performers - Jugglers, acrobats, 'magicians' and other minor performers.
Theatre - A dedicated theater may begin to emerge.

Ecclesiastical
Church - Moderate churches would begin to show up.

Nobility
Mayor's Palace - Mayor's residence. May also function as a meeting hall, with a separate wing for personal quarters.
Manor House - Lesser nobility may have fancy housing near the keep. They may even be somewhat fortified, or at least have a wall, a gate, and a dozen guards.

Public Service
Catacombs/Graveyard - Depending on size and concerns about necromantic magic, towns may have graveyards or catacombs.
Cistern &/or Aqueduct - Access to clean water becomes harder as settlements increase in size. Even with probable access to magical water purification, cities would still need access to lots of water. Nobles would surely have magically purified water, but lower class people may have to settle for mostly-clean aqueduct water. Rivers, especially those supporting a large population, were generally vile to say the least.
Gong Farmer (aka: poopsmith) - Scoops up all the animal droppings. Wee.
Herbalist/Apothecary - Probably a low-level healer, a druid who lives nearby, or possibly a fake. Makes potions and goes around healing people. In a City setting, this would almost certainly be a trained Cleric.
Jailhouse/stocks - Smaller than a true dungeon, but probably not much nicer. Crime was not well received way back when.
Prison - Towns would have a prison, though it may not be much more than a cell or two in a stone building.

Port & Aquatic
Dock - paths suspended above water for easy passage to and from ships.
Drydock - A warehouse where ships can be pulled out of the water for repairs.
Offices - Controls the paperwork, keeps track of where everything needs sent.

Netmaker
Sailmaker
Oarmaker (oarmaster?)


Types of Boats


Types of Boats:
I'm not even going to try narrowing this field. Suffice to say, boats have a long history of special functions. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Boat_types

I can't keep most of the names straight, but here's some general types of boats

Sail boat - Generally a small, sail-powered boat. Possibly used for personal transport?
Ship - Required deep water and a long dock to load supplies in.
Merchant Ship - Big, bulky, handles like a supersized SUV. Often unarmed or minimally armed, they focused on making big stupid boats that could carry lots of cargo.
Poleboat - Used in small canals and stuff. No oars, just a long pole to push off the bottom.
Canoe - Fits 2-4 people, excellent for small rivers. Can land anywhere, generally light enough to carry. An adventuring party would probably need one for every 2 people.
Rowboat - Has 2 oars that can be used by the same person. Possible to use for one person and some gear, but are generally much wider and bulkier than canoes.


Types of Mines


Mines tend to have only one or two kinds of resources, generally in veins. Minerals, like dirt and other rocks, naturally form layers. These layers often have wave shapes or other weird twists in them.

Types of mines:

Precious Metals
Residium
Gold
Silver
Copper
(bronze = alloy of copper, tin)
Platinum

Metals
Iron
Tin
(steel = refined iron, with traces of other things)
Mythril
Adamantium


Minerals
Salt
Gypsum

Gemstones
Rubies
Emeralds
Diamond

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City Structures



Dispersed Holdings & Residential
Ghetto - The Narrows, The Poor District, whatever. Full of hopeless souls trapped in a desperate situation. Probably home to the black market.
Suburbs - Essentially self-contained towns and villages built right next to the city itself. Probably outside the city walls, unless that's illegal.

Local Market
Coffee House - Hey, it comes from somewhere, right? Probably an upper/middle class thing, depending on local crops of course.

Industry
Bookbinder - Binds books, usually with leather or wood. Perhaps the cover is magically reinforced?
Firefighter - A bucket brigade, or possibly a water wagon with a hand-pump.
Scribe - Many uses for these people. Probably secretary type jobs for government functions, as well as working for publishers and bookbinders.
Stonemason - Carves stone, and builds stone buildings

Commercial
Carriage - Rent to have it drive you around town.

Mining

Administrative
Armory - Where the town guard stores their weapons. Also probably near/built-in to their training ground.
Bank - A bank (perhaps several) would begin to emerge, and they would probably have several mid-level spell users on-staff to keep the wards up and such. A high-security wing would be a must, so wealthy individuals can store their valuables. In a world with magic, banks must keep up with the times!
Barracks - Where the City Guard lives, practices, exc.
Barrister - Some kind of lawyer/contract place. "This would be in a city that allows and upholds a written contract or it could be a neutral guild negoitator"
Creation Forge - Where Warforged are made!
Teleportation Circle - Probably linked to other cities within the same country. Would be HIGHLY guarded, as it bypasses most of the city's defenses. A self-destruct rune may also be included, to destroy the gate in case of an emergency. Despite the risks, teleporting goods across vast distances would be a very powerful merchant feature. Of course, the local government would probably charge taxes/toles for public use...
Prison/Dungeon - No, not that dungeon. This one is deep underground, filled with crooks, and probably smells.

Culture & Education
Stage - For performances and such.
University - A place to study magical arts, or history for things like battle tactics. Would again be in the upper class district, probably near/with/part of the library.

Ecclesiastical
Cathedral - Big flashy church. Probably got it's own city block and stuff.

Nobility
Keep/Palace - Where the King/Queen/Emperor lives.

Public Service
Asylum - A super special happy place for the citizens with a different outlook on reality. Medieval cultures didn't understand developmental or psychological issues much (OK, not at all), and the common belief was that such people were possessed by demons. They were often tortured in an attempt to "snap them out of it," which had predictably unsuccessful results. In a DnD setting, magic such as mind reading and detect evil may eliminate much of this misunderstanding, so perhaps inmates would simply be restrained. Mages skilled in psychic abilities may work there, attempting to heal people.
Catacombs - While villages would generally have above-ground graveyards, cities would probably have underground catacombs, especially for the nobility. Towns could go either way.
Garden - A Botanical Garden or park inside the city.
Hospital - Sure, lots of places will have clerics to come tend to people, but clerics only get so many spells per day. There is always injury and disease, especially in times of hardship, famine, war. You're going to need a place to put these people, and probably a staff of experts and adepts to care for them.
Library - A public library may begin to emerge, though "public" may really mean "upper class" in most cases. Taking books home would likely be prohibited, though you would be free to take notes and spend many hours reading.
Orphanage & City Mission - "Please sir, may I have some more?"

Port & Aquatic


City Specialty Shops


High-society jobs
Jeweler's - High-class expert in jewelery and finery. Probably warded, just like the bank.
Goldmsith - Gives things a nice shiny coat of gold!
Silversmith - Makes silverware (that's how it got the name). Probably silvers weapons too.
Tinsmith - Makes things out of tin, including cooking utensils and pots.

Craftsmen Trades
Engineer's Guild - Specializing in building construction. May also build siege engines?
Stonemason - Carves stones into shape for various functions. May work as an artist or just make regular old brick walls.
Textile - Makes clothing out of cloth.
Weaver - Makes cloth out of raw materials
Wheelwright - Woodworker specializing in making wheels for carts.
Vase maker - Makes fancy vases and such out of clay

Weaponry
Sword smith
Armor smith
Chainmail Smith - Chainmail is hard to make.
Poleturner - Makes the poles for use in polearms and other things. Requires a large lathe.
Bowmaster - Makes bows.
Fletcher - Makes arrows and the fletchings for them. Probably enchants them as well!

Magical Jobs
Task Mage - Performes various low-level magical functions, such as weevil and rat wards. May also enchant a butcher's icebox to stay cold, another craftsman's tools to stay sharp, or a blacksmith's tools for durability.


Entertainment


Classical
Jugglers
Magicians
Singers
Dancers
Painters
Sculptors
Theater
Musicians
Menagerie (zoo of exotic animals)


Fighting
Gladiators - 1v1, team fight, 1v5, 1vMonsters, Team v Monsters, Monster v Monster, exc. Criminals were often thrown into the arena, given the chance to fight for their freedom. (see: Roman history, the movie Gladiator)
Duels


Sports
Races - Foot, flight, swimming, climbing, horses, endurance, biathlons, triathlons
Wrestling
Marksmanship Contests
Jousting
Bull riding


Magic
Teleportation
Transmutation
Fireworks


Casual Magic player since 2003 (Onslaught Block). 60% Johnny, 40% Timmy. Want a free, graphics-based, collection database to inventory your cards? I made one! Feedback welcome. Program runs offline, includes powerful search options, art, Oracle text, data import/export, and a rigorously updated list of every card ever printed. Version 5.13 (Theros) now available!

So. Green needs an iconic creature type, eh? How about wurms!

One Billion Words - 1001 Fantasy Landscapes: Share DnD-ish landscapes for use in homebrew campaigns!

Roadside Structures



Roads are another important part of world building. Just ask the Romans.
Here's some random info about roads:

Romans (IIRC) turned some cobble stones on their side, causing them to stick up. This did two things. First, it gave citizens a great stepping stone when the streets flooded. Secondly, it only allowed carts with a particular axel width to pass.

By having one road with slots for a 5' axel, only carts with a 5' axel could pass. In this manner, traffic could be controlled with little supervision.

Bridge - Crossing a large river/canyon. Probably stone if heavily used. probably well-guarded
Watch Tower - For observing the surrounding landscape.
Signal Tower - Used to send signals quickly, using non-magical means. Would need to be within line of sight, and probably closer for more detailed messages. In the Lord of the Rings, there was a series of signal towers used as an emergency cry for help. If the beacon (huge torch) was lit, help was needed. Honestly though, Heroic Tier wizards cold probably accomplish the same thing.
Checkpoint - Make sure you aren't sneaking around

Casual Magic player since 2003 (Onslaught Block). 60% Johnny, 40% Timmy. Want a free, graphics-based, collection database to inventory your cards? I made one! Feedback welcome. Program runs offline, includes powerful search options, art, Oracle text, data import/export, and a rigorously updated list of every card ever printed. Version 5.13 (Theros) now available!

So. Green needs an iconic creature type, eh? How about wurms!

One Billion Words - 1001 Fantasy Landscapes: Share DnD-ish landscapes for use in homebrew campaigns!

Ruins



Ruins are the remains of an older settlement, possibly even a different civilization.



Damage to Ruins



Depending on the age and type of ruins, different structures are more likely to still exist. In many cases, they could be damaged to some degree, but still be recognizable.

For a real-world example, think of the Egyptian pyramids.
The Pyramids were actually covered with a different type of limestone, smoothed to near perfection. Over time, however, this outer layer was removed by various people.
The basic structure of the pyramids remains, but some of its grandeur was lost.

The Elements
Water & Wind Erosion - Sharp corners have been rounded, controlled water sources may have escaped their containment, and the details of great buildings may have been worn off. Especially noticeable in a desert environment, where sandstorms essentially sandblast ruins to pieces.
Earthquakes - Probably results in toppled towers and collapsed structures. Otherwise, the structures may remain intact
Fire - If the settlement was ruined by a fire, signs of fire damage may be noticeable in the way buildings are destroyed. For example, metals may be found in puddles on the ground, the remains of arms and armor reduced to slag. In Rome, a great fire partly melted the stonework of the city, leaving a warped pattern to the stone.
Jungle - Everything is overgrown with vines and trees. Soil may have covered much of the ruins, the result of thousands of years of organic decay.

War
Siege - The ruins didn't fall apart - they were blasted apart. In other ruins, the structures may be mostly intact except for where they fell over. In this city, vertical walls are the exception, not the rule.



Ruins of Power



OK, so you want some ruins. That's easy enough - describe a bunch of buildings reduced to near rubble. Ah, but you want those ruins to be from an ancient and powerful civilization? Well now. That's quite a different story.
Here's a list of ways to hint at the power behind an ancient civilization.

Trivial Power
Trivialize something that is now rare, or hard to do. Take something the players have to work for, and hint that this civilization used it like water.
Telestone - Each house is equipped with a Sending Stone, which are all rigged up to make a telephone system. Sending Stones are a level 11 item. Similarly, Pouches of Shared Acquisition may have been in frequent use.
Immovable Pathway - Several walkways are scattered throughout the ruins, suspended in the air by a ton of Immovable Shafts.


Enduring Ruins
The ruins have been damaged, but are still untouched by the elements. Sure, the enemy blasted their way in, damaging many buildings, but otherwise the ruins look exactly the same.
Stasis Ruins - These ruins have somehow entered a magical stasis, protecting them from the elements. Oh, and physics. A picture would probably explain it best: http://benwootten.deviantart.com/art/Fallen-Empire-121335821


Epic Ruins
The ruins, though damaged, hint that this city was huge. Ten story buildings were common, crumbling skyscrapers claw for the sky, and the walls around the city stretch for miles.


Ancient Magic
Ancient enchantments are still working, despite the thousands of years since they were last used.
Light Sources - Magic light sources are still working, illuminating much of the ruins. Perhaps the light appears to have no source, or simply radiates from special ceiling tiles. Everburning torches would work, but those are so... last century.
Running Water - Magiked water sources are still creating water out of thin air. Said water is now overflowing its basin and is flowing throughout the ruins, causing further damage
Constructs Still Animated - The ancient constructs are still performing their designated task. Perhaps they were commanded to protect the city, or to rebuild it. Perhaps their task is now irrelevant, but they still follow it to the letter. For example, suppose a construct was told to fill a bath with water, but the tub cracked during the cataclysm. The construct has been fetching water for the tub for thousands of years.




Ruined Structures



The following list is a series of structures that are highly resilient, and among the most likely to survive mostly intact.

Fortress Walls - These are built to endure, and will probably last the longest, assuming they were built right.

Roadways and streets - Many of the roads Rome built are still around today. Barring extreme erosion and the advancement of nature, roads may remain intact for thousands of years.


1.Carved Stone Obelisk
2. Steele
3. Monument
4. Statue
5. Mine
6. Quarry
7. Smelter
8. Pottery Kiln
9. Blacksmith’s Forge
10. Charcoal Production Furnace
11. Stone Well
12. Irrigation Canal
13. Agricultural Field
14. Plantation Crop
15. Stone Docks
16. Bridge
17. Stone Paved Road
18. Causeway
19. Cemetery
20. Barrow Mound
21. Outdoor Altar Stone
22. Shrine
23. Buried Temple
24. Druid Grove
25. Ancient Tree
26. Ring of large Stones
27. Signal Tower
28. Watch Tower
29. Lighthouse
30. Fortified Cave
31. Bunker
32. Dungeon
33. Torture Chamber
34. Underground Laboratory
35. City Sewer
36. Catacombs
37. Castle Ruin
38. Foundations
39. Fitted Stone Wall
40. Re-used Rock Wall
41. Chimney
42. Fireplace
43. Partially-buried Brickwork

Casual Magic player since 2003 (Onslaught Block). 60% Johnny, 40% Timmy. Want a free, graphics-based, collection database to inventory your cards? I made one! Feedback welcome. Program runs offline, includes powerful search options, art, Oracle text, data import/export, and a rigorously updated list of every card ever printed. Version 5.13 (Theros) now available!

So. Green needs an iconic creature type, eh? How about wurms!

One Billion Words - 1001 Fantasy Landscapes: Share DnD-ish landscapes for use in homebrew campaigns!

Useful Links




Worldbuilding
http://qzil.com/kingdom/
An awesome tool that generates statistics for a medieval kingdom, complete with several towns, villages, and cities. Also approximates how many taverns, blacksmiths, carpenters, and many other occupations would be found in each settlement.

I strongly recommend this link: http://www.lythia.com/category/downloads/settlements/

It's free, designed for a medieval type setting, and it's very well detailed. It provides all manner of information on shops, inns, settlements and so on.

1001 Things to place in your city
(this is a previous incarnation of this thread I found, and will be scavenging it for more ideas)

1001 Country Ideas

Special Inns (or Businesses) & Their Novelties



Names, Ideas, People, and Objects

1001 Worst Names for an Inn

1001 Tavern Names

1001 Books, Tomes, and Scrolls
1001 Books on the Shelf

1001 Silly Magic Items
1001 Silly Spells
1001 Fun But Pointless Items
Lots of silly items you could place in a practical joke shop, a trinket seller, or something. Perhaps middle-class kids buy these things? Perhaps a street magician uses them?

1001 Stupid, Crazy, and/or Awesome Armor and Weapon Enchantments
1001 Weapons of Interest (weapon locker)

1001 Outfits
1001 Colorful Armor/Clothing Descriptions (another short list)

1001 Art Objects (Kalaka)
1001 Art Objects (Roguemagus)

1001 Monsters that break Stereotypes

url=http://forums.gleemax.com/showthread.php?t=1195319]1001 Holy People, Places, and Things[/url] (short, but kind of neat)


City-related Happenings

1001 Things adventurers get put in prison for

1001 things that can happen in an inn

1001 Campaign Ideas

1001 Strange/Humorous Adventure Plots
1001 Adventure Hooks (Short, but has some nifty ideas)

url=http://forums.gleemax.com/showthread.php?t=1196072]1001 Skill Challenges[/url]

Casual Magic player since 2003 (Onslaught Block). 60% Johnny, 40% Timmy. Want a free, graphics-based, collection database to inventory your cards? I made one! Feedback welcome. Program runs offline, includes powerful search options, art, Oracle text, data import/export, and a rigorously updated list of every card ever printed. Version 5.13 (Theros) now available!

So. Green needs an iconic creature type, eh? How about wurms!

One Billion Words - 1001 Fantasy Landscapes: Share DnD-ish landscapes for use in homebrew campaigns!

SETTLEMENT DEVELOPMENT

Settlements can appear anywhere. But in doing so, they will adhere to certain rules. So first off, let’s look at why our settlement is in this location.

A. Location of Settlements

There are four major reasons for a Settlement location: Resource Proximity, Environmental Transition, Connectivity of Routes, or Defensible Position.

...Resource Proximity…
1. Mineral
2. Agricultural Land
3. Building Material
4. Labour
5. Water
6. Wind
...Environmental Transition…
7. Forest-Tundra
8. Ocean-Coast
9. Desert-Plain
10. Foothills-Mountains
11. Lake-Lakeside
... Connectivity of Routes…
12. River Crossing/ Crossroads
13. River Branch/Fork in Road
14. Stop Over/Rest Stop
...Defensible Position…
15. ****/Sea Wall
16. Mound
17. Hill
18. Mountain
19. River bend
20. Gorge/Pass

Ex. The community of Umbrij sits on the river Avon where it meets the Trade Road. Our Community falls under a category 12 location (River Crossing/Crossroads). The River connects Timber up river and the Capital down river. The Trade Road on the other hand extends east and west.

B. Primary Function of Settlements

1. Market - (Description: A centralized community focussed on the collection and distribution of local produce. This type of community can function in isolation while access to a communication network is vital for the export of surplus produce. Prerequisite: Resource (Agricultural Land/Labour)).
2. Industrial - (Description: A community concerned primarily with the processing of raw materials into manufactured goods. Some will specialize in a single end-product. They have access to the resources necessary to process raw materials including labour, power (water for mills). Industrial communities require a communication network to function. Prerequisite: Resource (Minerals/Labour/Water/Wind); Network (Road/River)).
3. Commercial - (Description: A community involved in trade and financial activities (banking and money lending). They do not require traded produce to pass through the town and may be sophisticated enough to deal in document based trade and financial transactions. A communication network is critical to the survival of this community. Prerequisite: Node, Nexus (Road/River)).
4. Mining - (Description: This is involved in the extraction of minerals. It will be located where the minerals are and that can be anywhere. It requires access to a communication network. Prerequisite: Network (River/Road), Resource (Mineral/Labour)).
5. Administrative - (Description: This is the seat of government, whether the capital city or a local administration. This community will sit at a centre of a provincial or national communication network. Prerequisite: Node or Nexus (River/Road)).
6. Cultural/Education - (Description: These are centred on universities and colleges. They are centres of learning and have a selection of appropriate crafts to support the development, recording, and storage of information. There is some need for access to a communication network. Prerequisite: Network, Nexus, Node (River/Road)).
7. Ecclesiastical - (Description: Religious centres drawing pilgrimage, or housing religious associations or shrines. These require access to a communication network. Prerequisite: Network, Nexus, Node (River/Road)).
8. Primary Residence – (Description: This is the residence of a Ruler (Whether President, Emperor, King, Duke or Baron). It is a palace or castle and requires some access to a communication network. Prerequisite: Any Location).
9. Resorts – (Description: Baths, recreational districts, retreats. They require a favourable geographical location that provides both safety and healing. Resorts function on a communication network; Prerequisite: Coast, Hill, Network (Road/River)).
10. Port – (Description: located on the coast as a fishing community, a centre of sea trade and travel or located on a river for the movement of goods and people by river. A port requires communication networks that extend over water and land. Prerequisite: Environmental Transition (Coast); Pit-stop, node, nexus (River/road); Defensible Position (Lakeside)).
11. Residential - Description: These are designed to provide urban peoples with housing away from polluted, corrupted, or expensive urban centres. This specialization requires a second specialized centre in close proximity. Prerequisite: Network, node, nexus (Road/river)).
12. Dispersed – (Description: Isolated independent farms with a selection of skills necessary to support their independent nature. There is little social interaction. Prerequisite: Exploitable Resource (Agricultural Land), Defensible Position (Mound)).

Ex - In this case Umbrij is a Category 9 Function (Residential - the location is selected for its fewer toxins in the drinking water and air) and sits across the river from Ashwash: a Category 2 Function (industrial - Charcoal Production for the Capital down river using Timber from upriver).

C. Settlement Components

…Dispersed holdings…
1. Farm
2. Plantation
3. Ranch
4. Dairy-farm
…Local market…
5. Granary
6. Marketplace
7. Storehouse
8. Well
9. Trade-fair
…Industrial…
10. Mill wheel (water/wind/slave)
11. Charcoal Furnace
12. Potter’s Kiln
13. Glass Furnace
14. Smelter
15. Distillery
16. Barrel maker
17. Smokehouse
18. Winery
19. Blacksmith
20. Leatherworks
21. Tannery
22. Wheelwright
…Commercial…
23. Guild Hall
24. Bank
25. Goldsmith
26. Moneylender
27. Roadside Inn
28. Tavern
29. Stables
…Mining…
30. Clay pit
31. Stone Quarry
32. Peat Diggings
33. Salt Mine
34. Open Cut
35. Obsidian Scrounge
36. Mining tunnels
…Administrative…
37. Parliament
38. Council Office
39. Clan Hall
40. Prison
41. Work-farm
42. Labour Camp
43. Watch Tower
44. Fortress
45. Signal Tower
46. Outpost
47. Border Checkpoint
…Culture/education…
48. University
49. School
50. Bard’s College
51. Wizard’s Tower
52. Theatre
53. Arena
54. Fight Pit
55. Museum
56. Gallery
…Ecclesiastical…
57. Church
58. Temple
59. Shrine
60. Sacred Grove
61. Altar
62. Religious School
63. Abbey
64. Monastery
65. Synod Council
66. Paladin’s Training Hall
67. Barrow
68. Burial Mound
69. Crypt
70. Graveyard
71. Hospital
72. Monument
73. Carved Stone Obelisk
74. Stone Circle
…Primary Residence…
75. Castle
76. Palace
77. Keep
78. Manor house
79. chiefs hut
…Resort…
80. Bathhouse
81. Boarding Houses
82. Bed & Breakfast
83. Recreational Lake
84. Public Gardens
85. Hiking Trail
86. Hot pools
…Port…
87. Fishing hut
88. Ferry
89. Boathouse
90. Ocean port
91. River Port
92. Siding
93. Harbour
94. Docks
95. Shipyards
…Residential…
96. Estates
97. Manor Houses
98. Suburbs
99. Ghetto
100. Shanty

Ex – Umbrij is dominated by its crowded residential district straddling the trade-road on the east bank with a small marketplace where produce is sold to the residents, The west bank is dominated by the Charcoal furnaces, but there are also other industrial facilities polluting the air, ground, and river water. Docks, a timber yard where they dry and chop up logs into manageable timber for the charcoal furnaces and builders, a Tannery, pottery Kilns, and a Smelter making Ashwash a wretched, polluted place. To work.

D. The Debris Of Abandoned Settlements

When settlements are abandoned, due to what ever reason, many components are left behind. These components are often the hardest to remove (they are also characteristic of the settlement purpose) and will last centuries beyond the abandonment of the settlement.

1. Carved Stone Obelisk
2. Steele
3. Monument
4. Statue
5. Mine
6. Quarry
7. Smelter
8. Pottery Kiln
9. Blacksmith’s Forge
10. Charcoal Production Furnace
11. Stone Well
12. Irrigation Canal
13. Agricultural Field
14. Plantation Crop
15. Stone Docks
16. Bridge
17. Stone Paved Road
18. Causeway
19. Cemetery
20. Barrow Mound
21. Outdoor Altar Stone
22. Shrine
23. Buried Temple
24. Druid Grove
25. Ancient Tree
26. Ring of large Stones
27. Signal Tower
28. Watch Tower
29. Lighthouse
30. Fortified Cave
31. Bunker
32. Dungeon
33. Torture Chamber
34. Underground Laboratory
35. City Sewer
36. Catacombs
37. Castle Ruin
38. Foundations
39. Fitted Stone Wall
40. Re-used Rock Wall
41. Chimney
42. Fireplace
43. Partially-buried Brickwork

Ex – While Umbrij is a new community, Ashwash is the site of the original community. Outside its walls are abandoned clay diggings, and inside the walls there is a pulled down mud-brick Shanty where labourers originally resided.
The Citadel Megadungeon: http://yellowdingosappendix.blogspot.com.au/2012/08/the-citadel-mega-dungeon-now-with-room.html
Also, a town / city / village could spontaneously rise around a wizards tower built in a desolate area, or a nobleman's summer residence.
This tool is pretty handy:

http://qzil.com/kingdom/
^^Awesome tool. I've now created a Useful Links post, and added that to the top.
Very cool.



Thanks yellowdingo. I've edited about half of your contribution into the relevant posts, and restructured things slightly.

I'm now thinking of reordering all of the structures I have listed now based on your system. It makes things much easier to find, and fits well with the rest of your details.

I'm frankly overwhelmed! 0_o

Casual Magic player since 2003 (Onslaught Block). 60% Johnny, 40% Timmy. Want a free, graphics-based, collection database to inventory your cards? I made one! Feedback welcome. Program runs offline, includes powerful search options, art, Oracle text, data import/export, and a rigorously updated list of every card ever printed. Version 5.13 (Theros) now available!

So. Green needs an iconic creature type, eh? How about wurms!

One Billion Words - 1001 Fantasy Landscapes: Share DnD-ish landscapes for use in homebrew campaigns!

Updated with some minor changes.

Added a Notice Board to Town Structures - Administrative

Added some detail on Ruins

Casual Magic player since 2003 (Onslaught Block). 60% Johnny, 40% Timmy. Want a free, graphics-based, collection database to inventory your cards? I made one! Feedback welcome. Program runs offline, includes powerful search options, art, Oracle text, data import/export, and a rigorously updated list of every card ever printed. Version 5.13 (Theros) now available!

So. Green needs an iconic creature type, eh? How about wurms!

One Billion Words - 1001 Fantasy Landscapes: Share DnD-ish landscapes for use in homebrew campaigns!



Adding some useful links. Some of these are linked elsewhere, but I figured I'd include them here as well. Most are essentially ways to flesh out a particular setting with details (culture, names, objects, etc)

Casual Magic player since 2003 (Onslaught Block). 60% Johnny, 40% Timmy. Want a free, graphics-based, collection database to inventory your cards? I made one! Feedback welcome. Program runs offline, includes powerful search options, art, Oracle text, data import/export, and a rigorously updated list of every card ever printed. Version 5.13 (Theros) now available!

So. Green needs an iconic creature type, eh? How about wurms!

One Billion Words - 1001 Fantasy Landscapes: Share DnD-ish landscapes for use in homebrew campaigns!



I'd partly forgotten about this thread, but I figured I'd give it a bump. LadyAthena just compiled a list of 1001 threads, and included this, so I changed the name. Cause why not. :D

Casual Magic player since 2003 (Onslaught Block). 60% Johnny, 40% Timmy. Want a free, graphics-based, collection database to inventory your cards? I made one! Feedback welcome. Program runs offline, includes powerful search options, art, Oracle text, data import/export, and a rigorously updated list of every card ever printed. Version 5.13 (Theros) now available!

So. Green needs an iconic creature type, eh? How about wurms!

One Billion Words - 1001 Fantasy Landscapes: Share DnD-ish landscapes for use in homebrew campaigns!

WHen it comes to building a village such things as distance from the nearest keep [not all villages have a nice lord to protect them] or even what the Lord would do if they showed up [It's possible that he'd just close the gates to them, unlikely if the lord knows what's good for him, but there are lords who would do it.] and also how dangerous the area is around them might effect wether or not they have walls and even a poorly trained militia [The walls would also probably be of poor constuct] Another thing to consider would be if the village was a city before. Sometimes cities for various reasons break down and people leave in droves, that being said there would still be people who couldn't get out that might band together for survival.

Just thought I'd add that in, useful thread.
This thread is awesome. I repeat: AWESOME
Some very interesting ideas here and they have helped me greatly in preparing a town that I will be using in a game soon. Maybe when I've made the town I'll post it as an example?
Sure, help yourself! I'd love to see some complete ideas.


In fact, I've been trying to come up with Random Rooms In A Castle. I realized this past week that that's another idea with lots of potential. I may start another thread of a similar sort: 1001 Rooms in a Manor/Palace/Castle

In fact, why not just start it now! :D

Casual Magic player since 2003 (Onslaught Block). 60% Johnny, 40% Timmy. Want a free, graphics-based, collection database to inventory your cards? I made one! Feedback welcome. Program runs offline, includes powerful search options, art, Oracle text, data import/export, and a rigorously updated list of every card ever printed. Version 5.13 (Theros) now available!

So. Green needs an iconic creature type, eh? How about wurms!

One Billion Words - 1001 Fantasy Landscapes: Share DnD-ish landscapes for use in homebrew campaigns!

I was going through some piles of old papers and stumbled across some notes I took long long ago about this.  I'll have to finish going through the papers this weekend, but in the meantime I figured I'd

Casual Magic player since 2003 (Onslaught Block). 60% Johnny, 40% Timmy. Want a free, graphics-based, collection database to inventory your cards? I made one! Feedback welcome. Program runs offline, includes powerful search options, art, Oracle text, data import/export, and a rigorously updated list of every card ever printed. Version 5.13 (Theros) now available!

So. Green needs an iconic creature type, eh? How about wurms!

One Billion Words - 1001 Fantasy Landscapes: Share DnD-ish landscapes for use in homebrew campaigns!

Remember the 100 to 1 rule - 100 zebra for each 1 lion.

A city-state must have 100 farms for each 1 support or administration structure, such as a mill, castle, market, or bank.

The parks where we see ruins of castles today - in their era the greensward around the stone would have been completely built up in wood structures.
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