Blind PC

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I'm tossing around the idea of letting someone play a blind character in a campaign. I'm looking for pros and cons on the scenario. Obviously the character would have blindsight but I wonder how much range to allow for this. Any comments and concerns are welcome.
Nothing that can be abused, I'd only make it out to one square, and they can perceive anyone that attacks them at range (i.e, if a hobgoblin archer fires at them, they know exactly where they are when the arrow enter's their blind sight bubble and can defend from the attack normally).
If they want to play a blind character, make them really blind. Blindness is rather crippling, afterall. Not really a condition that an adventurer favours.
See, why would they want to adventure then? They wouldn't be able to adventure, that simple.
I blame Rutger Hauer.
Beware the standard "I wanna play a blind character" trap. This is where the player tries to convince you that being blind is a huge disadvantage, so he should get something to make up for it, and then the something to make up for it turns out to be better than regular vision would have been.

Remember that even if the pc is blind, the player isn't.
If they want to play a blind character, make them really blind. Blindness is rather crippling, afterall. Not really a condition that an adventurer favours.

Not to curb this off topic, however this statement isn't quite true, the blind are only as crippled as they allow themselves to be. Remember perception is only 1/5th sight, the other 4/5ths are made up of sound, scent, touch and taste. Senses that are enhanced with the loss of vision. Some blind can still walk like you or I do. This is especially true of those who went blind after they were born and trained their other senses to help compensate for the lack of vision.

Adventurers who travel while blind, cannot perceive the world as others would, but they still have a way to perceive the world. The perception skill covers things other than Search and Spot, search itself can be used by touch as well. A blind character gains a form of blindsense, so yes they would still be able to sense that arrow, maybe a bit late maybe soon enough to dodge or deflect it. I wouldn't call it blindsense though, not with a Blind PC. I would though use it as an opportunity as a DM to say things such as "Your other senses, helping to compensate for your lack of sight, gave you assistance as you dodge the air vibrations caused by an arrow shot from the southwest of your position." As a flavor thing when describing the action, or results of an action. This tells the player that his blind character didn't get hit, but now knows that the ranged opponent is off in the southwest of his position, exactly how far you don't know yet. No penalties really need to apply, and no bonuses either. Effectively the opponent still gains combat advantage in melee, but only for so long, and only as long as said opponent is able to take a move action in order to shift 1 square.

Now if you do want to say that the Blind PC gets a penalty to sight, attacks and the like, then by all means you can. Be aware though that this would mean that you are purposely and effectively turning the PC into an NPC instead and that this may earn you some resentment from that player. Remember adventurers are those who rise above their present standing to do something beyond everyone else.

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Make him blind, and that's it. No freebies or anything. Over time you could increase his perception skill for non-sight related checks as his other senses pick up the slack, but that's it.
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Blindness itself is actually pretty damn powerful under certain circumstances. It makes you immune to gaze attacks, which isn't very useful in Heroic but there's quite a few Paragon and Epic monsters with their best attacks as Gazes.
Have him be blind but it doesn't change combat related things becuase other senses make up for it like normal vision would. If he has low light / dark vision you can argue that races with those abilities also have better hearing aswell so that explains the difference.

For RP purposes make skill checks related to sight have a huge negative and ones based off others have a slight positive. For example if he wants to spot a guard thats so far off any normal sound he makes would be nearly impossible to hear he can't see them however if he's listening through a door he gets a small +X bonus probably based on tiers.
Have him be blind but it doesn't change combat related things becuase other senses make up for it like normal vision would. If he has low light / dark vision you can argue that races with those abilities also have better hearing aswell so that explains the difference.

For RP purposes make skill checks related to sight have a huge negative and ones based off others have a slight positive. For example if he wants to spot a guard thats so far off any normal sound he makes would be nearly impossible to hear he can't see them however if he's listening through a door he gets a small +X bonus probably based on tiers.

This. House of Flying Daggers is a great source for that, although the main character only pretends to be blind.
If he's a Drow then you don't need any mechanics changes to be blind thanks to Darkvision.
Not to curb this off topic, however this statement isn't quite true, the blind are only as crippled as they allow themselves to be. Remember perception is only 1/5th sight, the other 4/5ths are made up of sound, scent, touch and taste. Senses that are enhanced with the loss of vision. Some blind can still walk like you or I do. This is especially true of those who went blind after they were born and trained their other senses to help compensate for the lack of vision.

Adventurers who travel while blind, cannot perceive the world as others would, but they still have a way to perceive the world. The perception skill covers things other than Search and Spot, search itself can be used by touch as well. A blind character gains a form of blindsense, so yes they would still be able to sense that arrow, maybe a bit late maybe soon enough to dodge or deflect it. I wouldn't call it blindsense though, not with a Blind PC. I would though use it as an opportunity as a DM to say things such as "Your other senses, helping to compensate for your lack of sight, gave you assistance as you dodge the air vibrations caused by an arrow shot from the southwest of your position." As a flavor thing when describing the action, or results of an action. This tells the player that his blind character didn't get hit, but now knows that the ranged opponent is off in the southwest of his position, exactly how far you don't know yet. No penalties really need to apply, and no bonuses either. Effectively the opponent still gains combat advantage in melee, but only for so long, and only as long as said opponent is able to take a move action in order to shift 1 square.

Now if you do want to say that the Blind PC gets a penalty to sight, attacks and the like, then by all means you can. Be aware though that this would mean that you are purposely and effectively turning the PC into an NPC instead and that this may earn you some resentment from that player. Remember adventurers are those who rise above their present standing to do something beyond everyone else.

Senses don't magically improve with the loss of sight. Humans are sight-reliant animals, and the loss of it makes us more reliant on our other senses (and that doesn't improve them anymore than a person with sight would be capable of if he trained his other senses). That said, we do in fact lose a large portion of our effectiveness in the loss of sight. While blind people can function quite well in society, try taking a blind man to the local recruiting office and see if you don't get laughed out of the building when you tell the recruiter he's joining. Hell, take him down to a local gym and put him in the boxing ring... either way, he won't have the eye-hand coordination to be able to function as well in a combat situation (and no, that's not a pun... vision is one of the most important aspects of fine motor skill).

The notion comes from wuxia films and other such fiction in which there's always some blind master who always seems to be capable of pwning faces despite his handicap. Whether it's the wise one from Kung Fu, or Marvel Comic's Daredevil, there's often fictional blind characters that almost make the handicap seem awesome. However, it is just fiction.

That said, I think the best way to handle blindness is through voluntary penalties. As someone said previously, be wary of him trying to get bonuses that are more advantageous that sight in the overall (if he even mentions blindsight, slap him).
Yea, I once blinded one of my players' characters... the adventure didn't last much longer after that. He cried the whole way.
But from a totally fantasy point of view, a 'blind master' could be a fun and interesting character. The problem comes from adapting it to game mechanics.

I would perhaps do something like this.

Because of his heightened senses (due to his 'fantasy hero' status) the character functions normally with following exceptions:

-Character can't perform any tasks that clearly solely depend on sight. Like reading, using a spyglass, read hand signals, percieve insubstantial creatures, ect.

-Any effect affecting solely vision do not effect the character. Darkness, invisibility, blinding light, hypnotic gaze, ect.

Now up to here, this disability would clearly be an advantage game mechanics wise. But you could leave it here and demand some cost in stats feats or skills to balance it out. Or you could choose any of the following penalties to balance it out.

-She can't make any ranged attacks.

-Impose some movement speed penalty, like 1, 2 or 3 squares.

-Everyone has partial or total (harsh) concealment against her.

You could apply all and then offer removing or reducing them with expending feats. Thus having the character 'grow' to the 'blind master' status.
The notion comes from wuxia films and other such fiction in which there's always some blind master who always seems to be capable of pwning faces despite his handicap. Whether it's the wise one from Kung Fu, or Marvel Comic's Daredevil, there's often fictional blind characters that almost make the handicap seem awesome. However, it is just fiction.

I was beaten to this.

If the player isn't into getting 'superpowers' from this, then treat it as if he was sighted, except where gaze attacks and 'line of sight' are the issue. Aka burst effects and melee attacks work fine, but ranged attacks have total concealment. This may force the player into a defender role.
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Rule that I would change: 204.1b
204.1b Some effects change an object’s card type, supertype, or subtype but specify that the object retains a prior card type, supertype, or subtype. In such cases, all the object’s prior card types, supertypes, and subtypes are retained. This rule applies to effects that use the phrase “in addition to its types” or that state that something is “still a [card type].” Some effects state that an object becomes an “artifact creature”; these effects also allow the object to retain all of its prior card types and subtypes.
"Eight Edition Rules Update" We eventually decided not to change this template, because players are used to “becomes an artifact creature,” and like it much better.
Players were used to Combat on the Stack, but you got rid of that because it was unintuitive. The only phrase needed is "in addition to its types"; the others are misleading and unintuitive.
I appreciate all of the responses. I will take all of this into serious consideration before making a decision. Thanks again.
I actually did play a blind character in a campaign. I didn't exactly decide to play a blind character at the beginning. I wanted an ability called Blind Fighting back in 2E. During the discussion with my DM, the result was that my character was blind.

He was a 2E psionicist and had some clairevoyant-like abilities. I believe one of them was Danger Sense. I was blind, but I was the first one to realise something was going to happen. 2E psionics had some things that allowed me to see temporarily such as Hear Light. Yes, I can see with my ears. The power only lasted a short time, so I had to use it sparingly. Overall, it was a pretty interesting character and was a fun campaign.

There was a down side to it though. After the novelty finally wore off, being blind was just a pain. You were pretty much less effective in many situations. Taking penalties to attacks made you less effective in many combat situations. Having to use Hear Light just drains your psionic power points. It was a good thing that my character was psionic in that some of my powers do not require me to actually see the target. The ranged powers required me to target a mind which I can psionically look for. In hindsight, my character probably would have been just as interesting to play even if I had not been blind in the first place.

If you want to play a blind character, I would suggest you play someone who is only temporarily blind. If you plan to take something like Blind Fighting, you can justify it by having him be temporarily blinded for a time, so he had to learn this feat. Then after the novelty wears off, and it will, have him regain his sight. Now you experienced playing a blind character, have some role playing reason for picking Blind Fighting, recover from the blindness and continue as normal from there.
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If you want a permanently blind character, I have two suggestions:

1) Take the 'Blinded' condition and reduce the Perception check penalty to -5 (representing your other senses doing their best to catch up). A realistically blind character should never be able to perceive their surroundings as well as a sighted one, but the -10 penalty to Perception checks is unplayable for a long-term or permanent condition since they will likely be using it every round in combat encounters.

2) Play a cleric. They've got enough area effect powers that damage your enemies and help your friends that, even if you can't pinpoint an enemy's location with your Perception check, you can still hit the general vicinity and not worry about hurting your friends.
You know, I was thinking about it, and perhaps down the line we might see some sort of blind master paragon path that would allow people who want to play this sort of character to do so. If not a paragon path, then maybe a ki power source class, or even a special background. But either way, it's definitely something you have to be wary of when plugging into your campaign.
I'd play a beast master ranger with a seeing eye dog, 'cause my blind neighbor's dog is actually pretty cool.
I suspect it will probably turn up in the same book as the Monk. Blind Masters go together with Monks like Butter and Honey.


It should also be pointed out that we rely on Sight most of all of our five senses. The exact amount varies, but it's generally believed that the average human uses Sight for about 40 - 50% of his knowledge of the world. Touch comes in close second, followed distantly by Hearing. Taste and Smell are rarely used and people can operate just fine without them except in highly specific circumstances.
I got it! Wizards needs to release a blind race that can be played. That way, everybody who wants to play the blind hero has a race just for that purpose, and can fit whatever class they so want to.
I would probably make it partially blind, that way you're not cutting off your own nose (oh I'm such a wit :P ).
But I say partially blind because then your character can still see shapes within a few squares but cannot see fine detail; outside of those squares all enemies gain either cover or concealment, I don't know which, and the player has a -10 penalty to perception checks that involve sight but his other senses are enhanced (not daredevil enhanced which I think most other people worry about when someone wants to make a blind PC) but other perception checks like listening out are enchanced +5 that way it gives you a slight advantage in some cases but also points out that your character does have a disadvantage in most cases.
Or you could go further, the character provides combat advantage to ranged attacks, but because of heightened senses when listening for enemies he gets +2 to initiative
The problem is the character can be blind easily enough, and it can even the balanced, but the player isn't. And no matter how awesome a roleplayer he is he'll metagame at least a little and thus reduce or even negate the whole point of being blind.
The problem is the character can be blind easily enough, and it can even the balanced, but the player isn't. And no matter how awesome a roleplayer he is he'll metagame at least a little and thus reduce or even negate the whole point of being blind.

That is a good point.
But fortunately that has just given me a great idea that you could do.
Put on a blindfold! :D That way you can't actually see your enemies on the board or whatnot, no metagaming and you'll learn how to really play a blind person then.
Heh. What you really need is some way to black out the board for everything that's outside your blind players blindsense.

It would work in a computer game, but it's not really going to work on a tabletop game.


It would also work if the entire party was blind.
I got it! Wizards needs to release a blind race that can be played. That way, everybody who wants to play the blind hero has a race just for that purpose, and can fit whatever class they so want to.

Not really the best idea, judging by the response to the official Miraluka stats for Star Wars SAGA...
How about an ability like the blind dude from Basilisk? A bonus to listen che... Oh, wait, we're talking about 4e not 3.5e... Maybe a power like touchsig... Wait, that's 3.5 too.

Yeah, looks like everything you could do is with 3.5, not 4e... Blindsense out to 5ft maybe? Perhaps, as a race, a 1/encounter ability that let's them pinpoint a foe within x-distance? Nothing too unbalancing, but still good enough to where you can actualy play the character and not just sit there as dead weight.
I'm tossing around the idea of letting someone play a blind character in a campaign. I'm looking for pros and cons on the scenario. Obviously the character would have blindsight but I wonder how much range to allow for this. Any comments and concerns are welcome.

Oh? Would they? huh...

If one of my players asked to be a blind character I would tell them to stop making spot checks.

If they asked for benefits I might be a little confused, and explain that blindness doesn't give superpowers.

Then if they explained that they wanted to play a blind samurai style character, and explained how they wanted to roleplay it, I would let them be "Blind" as a roleplay tool, and grant no bonus or penalty for it. I would expect them as a player to not make spot based perception checks, and if they did this, I might let their character be immune to some gaze based attacks. (ones that seem to rely on eye contact over it seeing you). THe important part though, is that their character sheet would not have any + or - with the word blind written next to it to specify where a bonus comes from, nor would they grant the enemies any benefit at all. Perhapse their sense of hearing is so extreme it works as a form of eco location, or their sense of smell is amazing, or taste, what have you.

"In a way, you are worse than Krusk"                               " As usual, Krusk comments with assuredness, but lacks the clarity and awareness of what he's talking about"

"Can't say enough how much I agree with Krusk"        "Wow, thank you very much"

"Your advice is the worst"

How about an ability like the blind dude from Basilisk? A bonus to listen che... Oh, wait, we're talking about 4e not 3.5e...

Page 187 of the 4e player's Handbook, Perception DC for Listen checks.
Examples include Battle, Whispers, and More than 10 Squares Away.
Spot/Search is separate, as well as Find Tacks.
Maybe a power like touchsig... Wait, that's 3.5 too.

No, touchsight never existed in 3.5, so that's a bait 'n' switch.
Yeah, looks like everything you could do is with 3.5, not 4e...

What, you can't play fighters in 4e?
Blindsense out to 5ft maybe?

Can still use in 4e.
Perhaps, as a race, a 1/encounter ability that let's them pinpoint a foe within x-distance? Nothing too unbalancing, but still good enough to where you can actually play the character and not just sit there as dead weight.

It really depends on what the purpose of playing a 'blind' character is. If it is to 'experience' how a blind person is, then you should mostly be dead weight. If it is to get 'cool powers' in exchange for a 'disadvantage', then it requires a lot more work.

I am happiest ruling a blind PC should take no penalties and no benefits, and do it purely as a flavour change. (Hrm, a decision independent of editions/systems)
D&D 4E Herald and M:tG Rules Advisor I expect posters to follow the Code of Conduct, use Basic Etiquette, and avoid Poor Logic. If you don't follow these guidelines, I consider you to be disrespectful to everyone on these forums. If you respond to me without following these guidelines, I consider it a personal attack. I grew up in a bilingual household, which means I am familiar with the difficulties in adopting a different vocabulary and grammar. That doesn't bother me. Persistent use of bad capitalization, affirming the consequent, and flaming bother me a great deal.
Rule that I would change: 204.1b
204.1b Some effects change an object’s card type, supertype, or subtype but specify that the object retains a prior card type, supertype, or subtype. In such cases, all the object’s prior card types, supertypes, and subtypes are retained. This rule applies to effects that use the phrase “in addition to its types” or that state that something is “still a [card type].” Some effects state that an object becomes an “artifact creature”; these effects also allow the object to retain all of its prior card types and subtypes.
"Eight Edition Rules Update" We eventually decided not to change this template, because players are used to “becomes an artifact creature,” and like it much better.
Players were used to Combat on the Stack, but you got rid of that because it was unintuitive. The only phrase needed is "in addition to its types"; the others are misleading and unintuitive.
No, touchsight never existed in 3.5, so that's a bait 'n' switch.

Realy? That's odd because I swear it's on page 138 of the XPH. But that just might be someone casting Major Image on me..


The second half of my post was independant from the first part. I know blindsense exists in 4e, I was offering a solution. I highly doubt anyone would want to play a blind character, you might as well put a 1 in STR and DEX and call yourself Steven Hawkings (no offense to the guy) because that's as much good as you'll do to the group.
Not clear if you're looking at 3.5 or 4e, but if I were you I'd want to know why your player wants to do that. If he's a stat-driven player, he probably sees a way to game the system, and so I'd be very wary about letting him do it. If he's an RP-driven player, I'd be more willing to hear him out and talk it through.

If this is 3.5, I'd probably say, okay, you're blinded, with all the negatives that go with that, but I'll give you blindsense (not blindsight) out to 60'. I'd be willing to get rid of the Str and Dex penalties, and the AC Dex penalty in melee (but no other AC penalties). If the player's interested in RP and not creating some sort of "blind master" uber-character, then he ought to be fine with that. If not, again, I'd be very cautious about going down this road.
Zatoichi
Realy? That's odd because I swear it's on page 138 of the XPH. But that just might be someone casting Major Image on me..


The second half of my post was independant from the first part. I know blindsense exists in 4e, I was offering a solution. I highly doubt anyone would want to play a blind character, you might as well put a 1 in STR and DEX and call yourself Steven Hawkings (no offense to the guy) because that's as much good as you'll do to the group.

Ahhh, a SPELL from an EXPANSION.

Yes, quite fair to compare expanded material v. core material between editions. You didn't say it was a spell, and based on it's location in the argument, I thought you meant it was an ability. I prefer Deathwatch (and eliminate the 'evil' keyword). It allows you to know where people are without knowing where things are.
D&D 4E Herald and M:tG Rules Advisor I expect posters to follow the Code of Conduct, use Basic Etiquette, and avoid Poor Logic. If you don't follow these guidelines, I consider you to be disrespectful to everyone on these forums. If you respond to me without following these guidelines, I consider it a personal attack. I grew up in a bilingual household, which means I am familiar with the difficulties in adopting a different vocabulary and grammar. That doesn't bother me. Persistent use of bad capitalization, affirming the consequent, and flaming bother me a great deal.
Rule that I would change: 204.1b
204.1b Some effects change an object’s card type, supertype, or subtype but specify that the object retains a prior card type, supertype, or subtype. In such cases, all the object’s prior card types, supertypes, and subtypes are retained. This rule applies to effects that use the phrase “in addition to its types” or that state that something is “still a [card type].” Some effects state that an object becomes an “artifact creature”; these effects also allow the object to retain all of its prior card types and subtypes.
"Eight Edition Rules Update" We eventually decided not to change this template, because players are used to “becomes an artifact creature,” and like it much better.
Players were used to Combat on the Stack, but you got rid of that because it was unintuitive. The only phrase needed is "in addition to its types"; the others are misleading and unintuitive.
We nearly ended up with a blind ranger in my 4th edition game.

I designed an artifact that had the ful spectrum of full disadvantage to no disadvantage RP only blindness.

So how about a Psychic Owl?

Concordance starts at 5.

Concordance.
Blind Ranger Gains a Level +1d8.
Blind Ranger involves the Psychic Owl in Role Play +1 / day
Blind Ranger involves the Psychic Owl in readying an action in combat +1 / day
Blind Ranger allows the Psychic Owl to come to harm -2 / day
Blind Ranger surprises the Psychic Owl with an sudden action -1 / day
Blind Ranger upsets the Psychic Owl for whatever reason -1 / day (More DM dependent this one)

16-20 Pleased: The Psychic Owl communicates all surroundings telepathically. No blindness penalty in presence of the Owl. Role play consideration only (RP seeing everything from 3rd person perspective).

12-15 Satisfied: You grant combat advantage to everyone.
You have -3 to perception checks.

5-11 Normal: You grant combat advantage to everyone.
All enemies have partial concealment to you.
You have -6 to perception checks.
You cannot perceive colour.

1-4 Disatisfied: You grant combat advantage to everyone.
All enemies have partial concealment to you.
You cannot flank.
You have -8 to perception checks.
You cannot perceive colour.
You cannot recognise faces.

0 Angered: You grant combat advantage to everyone.
All enemies have partial concealment to you.
You cannot flank.
You have -10 to perception checks.
For all role playing you are treated as blind with all real world disadvantages.
That's kewl.... I like that.
D&D 4E Herald and M:tG Rules Advisor I expect posters to follow the Code of Conduct, use Basic Etiquette, and avoid Poor Logic. If you don't follow these guidelines, I consider you to be disrespectful to everyone on these forums. If you respond to me without following these guidelines, I consider it a personal attack. I grew up in a bilingual household, which means I am familiar with the difficulties in adopting a different vocabulary and grammar. That doesn't bother me. Persistent use of bad capitalization, affirming the consequent, and flaming bother me a great deal.
Rule that I would change: 204.1b
204.1b Some effects change an object’s card type, supertype, or subtype but specify that the object retains a prior card type, supertype, or subtype. In such cases, all the object’s prior card types, supertypes, and subtypes are retained. This rule applies to effects that use the phrase “in addition to its types” or that state that something is “still a [card type].” Some effects state that an object becomes an “artifact creature”; these effects also allow the object to retain all of its prior card types and subtypes.
"Eight Edition Rules Update" We eventually decided not to change this template, because players are used to “becomes an artifact creature,” and like it much better.
Players were used to Combat on the Stack, but you got rid of that because it was unintuitive. The only phrase needed is "in addition to its types"; the others are misleading and unintuitive.
Ahhh, a SPELL from an EXPANSION.

Yes, quite fair to compare expanded material v. core material between editions. You didn't say it was a spell, and based on it's location in the argument, I thought you meant it was an ability. I prefer Deathwatch (and eliminate the 'evil' keyword). It allows you to know where people are without knowing where things are.

Not a spell, power. Say it with me pow-er. And it's in the srd so it's fair game. :P
I like the psychic owl but... It all depends on if they're starting level one. If he's had the owl for awhile I could see it starting at satisfied at least.

A nice option really, though having an owl companion has benefits on top of the blindness: "Hey Hooty, could you go check out that room for us?" Which gives the dm a chance to eat the owl... I like this option best.

To take it a step furthur, How could be turned into a blindfold artifact for a blind Swordsman instead of a blind ranger? Perhaps an artifact that abhors senseless violence? Because you can't hurt a piece of clothe as easily as an owl.
Not a spell, power. Say it with me pow-er. And it's in the srd so it's fair game. :P

It's not a spell? It has a caster level (which is different from the level grouping of the spell itself), casting time, range, target, and duration, and it's not a spell?

Must be a goose. :P
D&D 4E Herald and M:tG Rules Advisor I expect posters to follow the Code of Conduct, use Basic Etiquette, and avoid Poor Logic. If you don't follow these guidelines, I consider you to be disrespectful to everyone on these forums. If you respond to me without following these guidelines, I consider it a personal attack. I grew up in a bilingual household, which means I am familiar with the difficulties in adopting a different vocabulary and grammar. That doesn't bother me. Persistent use of bad capitalization, affirming the consequent, and flaming bother me a great deal.
Rule that I would change: 204.1b
204.1b Some effects change an object’s card type, supertype, or subtype but specify that the object retains a prior card type, supertype, or subtype. In such cases, all the object’s prior card types, supertypes, and subtypes are retained. This rule applies to effects that use the phrase “in addition to its types” or that state that something is “still a [card type].” Some effects state that an object becomes an “artifact creature”; these effects also allow the object to retain all of its prior card types and subtypes.
"Eight Edition Rules Update" We eventually decided not to change this template, because players are used to “becomes an artifact creature,” and like it much better.
Players were used to Combat on the Stack, but you got rid of that because it was unintuitive. The only phrase needed is "in addition to its types"; the others are misleading and unintuitive.
Touchsight is a psionic power. It has a manifestor level, manifesting time, range, duration, and target. It's a power. It's as different as.... Damn, can't think of a non-racial comparison.