Primordial War

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I've been seeing references to the Primordial War being made a lot in the various columns and editorials on the D&D website and it got me thinking...

Other then 'extremely powerful beings who created the gods' I don't know a lot about them, so I dug around a little with not a whole lot of luck. From what I know (or think I know), the Primordials are extremely powerful beings that were around since before the creation of the D&D cosmonology. They created the gods, and the gods rebelled against their creators in a war that is now refered to as the Primordial War. This was long before the Material plane came about, and Elves and Dwarves and Humans didn't even exist.

My question to all of you is, what exactly were these Primordials and what took place during the Primordial War?

Most importantly: How viable would it be to try and run a campaign set in the midst of this time period, where the players actually took part in the Primordial War? Your thoughts?

Thanks for your responses.
I don't think the primoridals created the gods, they were just already there and ruling when the gods came into being and didn't want to share.

I think I read somewhere that the surving primordials retreated into the elemental chaos after it was formed and became the demonlords (so Orcus is primordial).

Since Orcus (and also Demogorgon) having been said to be weaker than the deities (Orcus lvl 33 solo instead of Moradin lvl 38 solo) I think we can conclude that the primordial weren't more powerfull than the deities but just more numerous.
I don't think the primoridals created the gods, they were just already there and ruling when the gods came into being and didn't want to share.

I think I read somewhere that the surving primordials retreated into the elemental chaos after it was formed and became the demonlords (so Orcus is primordial).

Since Orcus (and also Demogorgon) having been said to be weaker than the deities (Orcus lvl 33 solo instead of Moradin lvl 38 solo) I think we can conclude that the primordial weren't more powerfull than the deities but just more numerous.

Thanks for your response. I have seen little to no information on this, so most of it is wild speculation. In the game Exalted, which I have never played, the Primordials created the gods, which is were I got that info. Wether that ring true to D&D as well is total speculation.

Nobody seems to know that much about the Primordial war. I am hoping the Manual of the Planes due to release in December has more info on this.

In short, I am intrigued by what is contrived as the 'origins of the D&D universe' so to speak, in terms of cosmonology at least, and I would like to run a game set in this period. The lack of general info though is making it rather difficult.
Since Orcus (and also Demogorgon) having been said to be weaker than the deities (Orcus lvl 33 solo instead of Moradin lvl 38 solo) I think we can conclude that the primordial weren't more powerfull than the deities but just more numerous.

I don't think so. Io took on a primordial by himself and was cleaved in two. So a primordial (easily was my impression) killed a god. Now the two parts of Io did immediately form into gods, but they only managed to kill the primordial by working together.

So I'd say primordials were definitely comparable in power to the gods.
So I'd say primordials were definitely comparable in power to the gods.

Agreed.

If I recall correctly, the gods came into existence in the Astral Sea, while the primordials (elemental titans?) arose from the Elemental Chaos. I don't believe the gods were created by the primordials in the standard POL setting. But hell, you can change that around with a snap of your fingers if you want.

The 2 groups warred upon each other for dominion over creation. Eventually the primordials were defeated by the gods and entombed in divine prisons, leaving creation in the hands of the gods.

As for your other question, having PC's opererating during the Primordial War may pose a few challenges. The power scale is very high, so unless these are high level characters ( 20+ ?) I see them more as pawns that are moved from 1 confrontation to another.

A different approach might be to consider the use of "flashbacks". Imagine for a moment that your current party are actually comprised of the re-incarnated spirits of a group of divine heroes from the Primordial War. As they explore the current world, they "re-live" (ie play out) the challenges of their ancient spirits. These flashbacks provide not just a glimpse of the war, but clues to their current goals and motivations.

I hope that helps.
I don't think so. Io took on a primordial by himself and was cleaved in two. So a primordial (easily was my impression) killed a god. Now the two parts of Io did immediately form into gods, but they only managed to kill the primordial by working together.

So I'd say primordials were definitely comparable in power to the gods.

Don't forget that they're coming in different powerlevels. Moradin and Orcus are 38 and 33 respectively.

That doesn't rule out a lvl 36 primordial cleaving a lvl 31 deity into two. I just wanted to say that the primordial aren't as rule of thumb tougher than the deities
in my campaign, both are of the same creation, just in different locations, ie the astral sea and the elemental chaos. each has a fragment of the initial universal creators's psyche within them, representing a sliver or aspect of the once overall entity, hense portfolios etc kind of fit.

mortals have a soul forged from the same stuff that gives the gods and primordials their power, the more mortals that worship you, the more their power lends to yours, making sense that different primordials and different gods have different power levels.

the fundemental difference is the plane in which they reside, as they are ideals and thoughts given form , the form is created from the planar essence, meaning primordials are more chaotic and volatile whereas gods can be somewhat cunning and calculating, this is no hard and fast rule, as a god may have recieved an aspect of destruction and chaos from the splintered creator entity.

so basically theyre the same thing from different viewpoints, all warring with each other to be the one with the biggest amount of followers to eventually usurp the others, because when a god or primordial is shattered and exstinguished, his essence is absorbed by the victor and the mortals worshiping him transfer their power also.

so its a big battle royale, but with lots of divine truces and alliances.
But what exactly is a primordial, in terms of the game that I could understand. Are we talking like, really high level elementals here? Or are they, as one poster sugested, the demonlords (ala Orcus)? Or are they some other creature altogether.

And if I wanted to run a campaign set in this era it would obviously be an epic campaign, of that there is no doubt. But does anyone have any suggestions of how to pull this off? Do the PCs play the Gods? The Primordials? Or their pawns/followers?

I like to think that the gods as we know them today are not the same as they once were (if they are even the same at all), so that would involve some creative changes on my part to account for that period. What else?
Primordials would have power levels in the same range of the Gods. Some may only be Exarch level. Others, the ones that were imprisoned because they couldn't be destroyed, could be equal to any of the highest level Deities. Unlike Gods, which seem to need souls and devotion (essentially beings of Order), Primordials are more the stuff of Chaos & raw energies.
Primordials would have power levels in the same range of the Gods. Some may only be Exarch level. Others, the ones that were imprisoned because they couldn't be destroyed, could be equal to any of the highest level Deities. Unlike Gods, which seem to need souls and devotion (essentially beings of Order), Primordials are more the stuff of Chaos & raw energies.

Sounds good. Has there ever been printed information about the Primordials in a 3.5 (or older) Rulebook? What do they look like? Does anyone know?

And what of that one posters claim that the Primordials are Demon lords? Is that just nonsense?
This just in!

Earth Titan

Formed from the elements, giants helped the primordials shape the world in the old times. The first giants were the titans -- huge, roughly shaped humanoids whose appearance clearly shows a link to the primordials and their elemental origin. Formed from the bedrock of the world, the Earth Titan is one such titan.

From the D&D Miniatures article found here:
http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/mi/20080508a

New info on the Primordials and the origin of the world! Aparantly, acording to 4th Edition history, the PRIMORDIALS created the world, not the gods as previously suspected. I had thought the Primordials fought the Gods in a war that would decide who would have the rights to create the world? But I guess not. In addition, it would seem acording to this same article that Giants are related to Titans, and by association: the Primordials!

You've seen this guy's little brother a few times before in the D&D Miniatures line -- the Hill Giant. Now meet the Earth Titan, the lowest-level titan in the new Monster Manual. More monstrous than the hill giant, the Earth Titan is a great example of how giants and titans work in the new edition. Titans (and to some extent giants) have a supernatural look that makes these creatures stand out as something more than just a big person.

In addition to the above news, the same article would seem to claim that the war between the Gods and the Primordials took place at a much later time then I had also suspected, AFTER the creation of the world, not before. This is made aparant by the fact that the Dwarves fought back against the Giants at the same time as the Gods fought against the Primordials. This news opens up a ton of possibilities for a Primordial War based campaign.

The dwarves were also forged from bedrock, but their creator was the god Moradin. Like their stature, their power was small. Shortly after their creation, the dwarves were enslaved by the giants. During the fight between the Immortals and the Primordials, the dwarves fought their giant oppressors and were freed from a life of enslavement. Dwarves have long memories, and to this day, they despise giants and titans.

I'm really hoping to see more information on the Primordials and their war against the gods and how the world was made, because I'm quite interested in running a game set in that timeset. So if you find any info on those subjects please post it here.
Where do aboliths fit into all of this?...
Where do aboliths fit into all of this?...

That's a good question. Wish I knew the answer. Aboliths are Aberations, so they are from the Far Realm I would asume. What part did the Far Realm play during the Primordial War?

There's far too many un-answered questions.
I think of the Primordials as the embodiment of place and survival, and Deities as the spirit of ideaologies and morality.

For example, one Primordial might embody Fire...it's necessary to manage grasslands, helps crack open pine cones so seeds can spread, cooks food, boils water, aids the smith at his forge, etc. However, fire also has a destructive side if mismanaged. Native community might gather before fall rains and set fire to the land, cooking grasshoppers & muskrats in their homes for food, and rejuvenating the landscape. "Worship" of this primordial means humbling yourself by living, honoring, and passing down that relationship with fire. So, for survival, it would make sense to have a fire-tender at all times, be able to make a friction fire, etc. I guess you could call it an ethic of stewardship, but it's not bounded by normal moral concerns of religion. In other words, while there is a clearly appropriate to handle fire, there is no "Good" or "Evil" associated with it, no eternal judgment, no consequence besides what happens to you and your community.
* Primordials are Elemental Immortals responsbile for creating the world
* Each Primordial embodies a natural concept or process
* Primordials aren't worshipped in the traditional sense & have no temples
* Primordials operate outside of right-wrong thinking - they are amoral
* To the Primordials the Gods are illusory deceivers usurping their creation
* After their defeat by the gods, the Primordials were imprisoned
* Fey, Elementals, druids, and hunter gatherers are closest to Primordial understanding

A Deity, on the other hand, might embody Justice...the debate between rehabilitative and restorative justice, the importance of enforcing laws, how no one is above justice, principles of equality, and the fine line between justice and revenge. While the deity may provide a clear answer to complex questions, sects certainly form around different interpretations - the Deity is sufficiently expansive to encompass these differing perspectives too, such is the nature of ideas, allowing for "Good" and "Evil" followers. Worship of the deity involves sacrificing your personal will for the greater divine will - to follow those commandments faithfully. Failing to observe or breaking these commandments is a sin, and you will be punished in this life (by temple authority) or else in the afterlife.
* Gods are Astral Immortals responsbile for creating sentient races
* Each God embodies an ideaology or moral principle
* Gods encourage/demand worship and always have temples
* Gods enforce right-wrong thinking - they are morality made manifest
* To the Gods the Primordials are misguided and heartless despots
* After their victory, the Gods retreated to the Astral which they don't leave
* Angels, clerics, and faithful people are closest to Divine understanding

Most Primordials and Gods chose the path of conflict, using Aberrations as implements of destroying the other side. Very few chose the path of reconciliation, and these have mostly faded from consciousness or are remembered by tribespeople who integrate Primordial and Divine understanding.
Wow quickleaf, that's a lot of info right there. Thanks so much for your post, you've given me a more profound understanding into the D&D cosmonology.

I'm one step closer to my Primordial War campaign.
Wow, the excerts just keep flowing with rich info that directly ties to the campaign I am building here!

4th Edition Excert: Giants
http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/4ex/20080512b

The new cosmology, rooted in a great war between the primordial first creators and the gods, offered a way to incorporate giants into the setting. Many existing giants already embodied elemental forces, such as stone, fire, and wind. The natural next step was to make them into elemental beings, the first creatures shaped by the primordials to assist them in their work. This approach actually returned giants to their Classical roots as creatures embodying natural forces. In keeping with that ancestry, titans also became an elemental race, precursors to and creators of the lesser giants. Now a titan isn’t just a big dude with a ton of spell-like powers, but a powerful leader whose nature is closely tied to an element or kind of energy.

Having been forged in the Elemental Chaos, giants moved into other worlds. The fall of the primordials drove their creations into the planes, where they adapted to local conditions and became less closely tied to their origins. Some giants built mighty empires in the world, enslaving the dwarves in so doing. By adding this backstory to dwarves in the implied setting of the game, we were able to provide some roleplaying hooks for that race, as well as better define the roles of elemental dwarflike creatures in the setting, most notably galeb duhr and azers.

A few, such as the death giants, embody their adopted planes more than the elements—but that heritage lives on, along with their memories of ancient power and empire. When the primordials stir, giants are naturally drawn to their side in order to fight once more for control of creation.

Giants are hulking humanoid creatures with fundamental ties to the world, be that bedrock, uncontrollable fires, raging storms, or inevitable death. The first giants were massive titans of fire and frost, storm and stone. These giants labored under primordial lords to shape the newly forming world.

In the eons since the first days, giants have multiplied and moved on, finding places to call their own in planes beyond the Elemental Chaos, including the Shadowfell and the Feywild, and even in the realm of their masters’ deific foes, the Astral Sea. However, giants prefer the world their labor helped create, and giants of every variety can be found upon it. Indeed, when the primordials retreated from the world, one of the first empires of that dawn era was one created by giants, and their slaves were the children of Moradin. But those heady days are long vanished.

Giants and titans tend to lair in extreme environments, including scrublands, mountain peaks, volcanic calderas, and searing deserts. These brutal landscapes remind giants of the Elemental Chaos where their ancestors first drew breath.

Giants as a whole answer to no particular overlord or higher power, nor are they known to cooperate among themselves. Indeed, giant clans often make war each other, though no one except giants know why they fight. However, should ever an imprisoned or lost primordial return to the world, giants of the lineage once loyal to it would obey that ancient one’s command.

Giants have marshaled just so in past primordial awakenings. Giants have long memories and longer oral histories, and most clans await the day they can renew their claim on the world in service to an unstoppable primordial entity.

Cool.
That's a good question. Wish I knew the answer. Aboliths are Aberations, so they are from the Far Realm I would asume. What part did the Far Realm play during the Primordial War?

There's far too many un-answered questions.

The Far Realm plays little to no part in the Primordial War, though my interpretation of events is that one of the Primordials sought power to defeat the gods there, but in touching the Far Realm was consumed by madness. Retreating to the depths of the Elemental chaos this Primordial became the Elemental Evil and around it the swirling mass of pure chaos and hatred formed: the Abyss.

In the desert
I saw a creature, naked, bestial,
who, squatting upon the ground,
held his heart in his hands, and ate of it.
I said, "is it good, friend?"
"It is bitter – bitter," he answered;
"but I like it,
"beacuase it is bitter,
"and because it is my heart."

the primorial is whatever you really want it to be. I hope WOTC doesn't go into it much. I like it as an adventure seed and storytelling device. From what we know now, all we have is that primorials fought the dieties of the astral sea and that primoridals created the giants and their kin. Thats pretty much it. I want them to leave it that vague.

I mean leaving as such leave it open for me to do Olympians vs. Titans(aka greek god) backstory, or do new religion vs old, material vs abstract, etc.. I dont want to know the details from WOTC. I want them to give me a vague idea here and let me run with it for my own campaign.
the primorial is whatever you really want it to be. I hope WOTC doesn't go into it much. I like it as an adventure seed and storytelling device. From what we know now, all we have is that primorials fought the dieties of the astral sea and that primoridals created the giants and their kin. Thats pretty much it. I want them to leave it that vague.

I mean leaving as such leave it open for me to do Olympians vs. Titans(aka greek god) backstory, or do new religion vs old, material vs abstract, etc.. I dont want to know the details from WOTC. I want them to give me a vague idea here and let me run with it for my own campaign.

Not everyone wants a vague idea though, and idealy I think it's better if they provide something and then give you the option to leave it out if you don't like it, then not providing something and forcing you to add it in if you do like it.

Anything they state as facts about the Primordials that doesn't bode well with you, you can edit to your liking, or leave out altogether.

Personally I hope they provide more info because it would mean I have less work to do, and I'm a lazy DM. :P
Not everyone wants a vague idea though, and idealy I think it's better if they provide something and then give you the option to leave it out if you don't like it, then not providing something and forcing you to add it in if you do like it.

Anything they state as facts about the Primordials that doesn't bode well with you, you can edit to your liking, or leave out altogether.

Personally I hope they provide more info because it would mean I have less work to do, and I'm a lazy DM. :P

I think that to date they've hit on a pretty good balance between specific and general. There's enough hooks built into somehting like the Primordial War to make it really cool and appealing, but also enough holes to easily fit your own ideas in. We have no mention of the names of any of the great heroes of the War, for example, just that great heroes existed.

In the desert
I saw a creature, naked, bestial,
who, squatting upon the ground,
held his heart in his hands, and ate of it.
I said, "is it good, friend?"
"It is bitter – bitter," he answered;
"but I like it,
"beacuase it is bitter,
"and because it is my heart."

I just found out (via the Giants Excert) that Primordial is a Language in 4th Edition! This bodes good news for my upcoming campaign, as the Primordials are likely to be detailed a lot more then just background figures if there is a language for them.
I asked WotC_Greg (who is doing work for the Manual of the Planes 4e) a few questions about the Primordials and the War associated with them, this was his response:

To answer your first inquiry—I'd check page 56-57 of the Worlds and Monsters preview book. That has a large section about the Elemental Chaos and Primordials.

As for setting a campaign during that period—it's an intriguing idea. With the cosmology, most of the humanoid races would be mostly undeveloped during that period. You'd probably need to make it a paragon- or epic- campaign, and you might have to change the cosmology a bit so the humanoid races had been around a little longer than the current story allows. Or you could try something with time travel...start a heroic tier adventure in the "present" and then have the character travel back in time because of some imminent calamity—maybe some Primordial is trying to alter time so that the Primordials actually win the Primordial War. Goodluck with your campaign!

There's an interesting thought: Time Travel to save the world during it's first climactic war! And we've already been shown at least one monster that could be used with that plot twist: the Phane, a time traveling creature.

It definitely has possibilities.
Another way to get races into that time period is to have some big calamity in the future and so a large group (made up of mostly tieflings, dragonborn and any other race not made at that stage) heads back in time. Unfortunately they head back to before or during the Primordial War.

That way your players can play any of the PHB races.
I got more info out of WotC_GregB regarding the Manual of the Planes and the Primordial War campaign! Check it out below:

Show
Also I have another question. You don't have to give me any details, but I would like to know if there will be info on the Primordials at all in the Manual of the Planes? Do you think this suppliment will be essential to own for a Primordial War campaign?

The Manual of the Planes should have everything you need to run an adventure in the Elemental Chaos or anywhere else across the planes. A lot of the book is flavor, but since we're basically introducing a new setting (in a sense), I think it's appropriate. Everything I've read so far from MotP has been evocative, and you will find no shortage of information on the Primordials and the war. There's also a whole chapter dedicated to monsters, including a lot of epic-level threats.

Another very important question: Have the Feywild and Shadowfell always been around? Or were these reflections of the world created at some point in history? Mainly I want to know if these reflections were there during the time of the Primordial War.

I'm not sure about this off the top of my head. I believe they were created at the same time as the world. Basically, there was the Elemental Chaos and Astral Sea and from the beings in those planes came the creation of the world and the Shadowfell and Feywild.

Are there any other locations I should look for info on the Primordials? (other then Worlds and Mosnters, Manual of the Planes, and Core Rulebooks)

That probably covers it for the 2009 release. There'll be DDI support for MotP around the time of its release, so that's worth checking out too. Honestly, though, MotP has more delicious morsels of planar stuff than you could ever possibly eat.

Goodluck with your campaign, sounds like a fun one.

Pretty freeking sweet if I do say so myself.
Do you mind if I steal this idea Zinger and put it in my list of possibly campaigns? This just sounds really awesome!
Do you mind if I steal this idea Zinger and put it in my list of possibly campaigns? This just sounds really awesome!

Go nuts. Steal away. But please, any new info you find while building your campaign, put it here.
But please, any new info you find while building your campaign, put it here.

Will do
The more I've helped you with the fluff the more interested I've become in this. I'm tempted to start writing an entire campaign arc for the Primordial war. What are you thinking for a story on the PC level (as opposed to the meta-story)?

In the desert
I saw a creature, naked, bestial,
who, squatting upon the ground,
held his heart in his hands, and ate of it.
I said, "is it good, friend?"
"It is bitter – bitter," he answered;
"but I like it,
"beacuase it is bitter,
"and because it is my heart."

The more I've helped you with the fluff the more interested I've become in this. I'm tempted to start writing an entire campaign arc for the Primordial war. What are you thinking for a story on the PC level (as opposed to the meta-story)?

I think something that will represent each of the races in the turmoil is essential. The campaign will have to represent strongly the dwarves struggle against the giants, and the elf parent races turmoil that makes them split into elves, eladrin, and drow. The campaign should take a good hard look at how each race is individually affected by the Age of Chains, and then after that probably take the thing a step up, to the Elemental Chaos against the Primoridals.

I think a new race is needed that combines abilities from eladrin, elf, and drow.

As WotC_GregB mentioned, all the races would be underdeveloped at that time, so that needs to be aparant.

If time travel is used, it shouldn't be used to a point where the players feel so far removed from their time that they can't feel responsible for saving the world so to speak.

How to do all that without railroading the players to play certain races might be a bit tough.

I think at some point I will have players play angels fighting titans, and run a big war with that in mind.
The Far Realm plays little to no part in the Primordial War, though my interpretation of events is that one of the Primordials sought power to defeat the gods there, but in touching the Far Realm was consumed by madness. Retreating to the depths of the Elemental chaos this Primordial became the Elemental Evil and around it the swirling mass of pure chaos and hatred formed: the Abyss.

I've been asking myself this same question: just how was the Far Realm involved, if at all, in the Primordial War. It seems unlikely none of the sides - which were, no pun intended, godlike in power - would have tried to use it in some way. I quite like this interpretation, cheers LFK

Though I still want to know the relationship between the Far Realm, Astral Sea and Elemental Chaos...
So the Elemental Evil is Tharizdun, which brings D&D full circle in terms of the Elder Evil. But my understanding is the Lady of Pain (and possibly Asmodeus) is also in the Primordial class of power - basically an intrinsic piece of the multiverse, without which it would not exist. The gods are Johnny-come-lately's (at least in the multiverse's perspective), and their existence, while impacting the planes, is not necessary to reality.

Sorry, just tossing that out there, based on what was published in the last Dragon magazine, talking about the "Secrets of D&D" and all that.
So the Elemental Evil is Tharizdun, which brings D&D full circle in terms of the Elder Evil. But my understanding is the Lady of Pain (and possibly Asmodeus) is also in the Primordial class of power - basically an intrinsic piece of the multiverse, without which it would not exist. The gods are Johnny-come-lately's (at least in the multiverse's perspective), and their existence, while impacting the planes, is not necessary to reality.

Sorry, just tossing that out there, based on what was published in the last Dragon magazine, talking about the "Secrets of D&D" and all that.

Thanks for your input, no apology nessesary! You just brought us to Page 2! :P
Just to put in my creative juices, I had an idea for inserting my players into the Primodial Wars with a medium other than time travel.

I was planning on sending them to the Primordial War era during their Paragon portion of the campaign (probably levels 14-16ish). The campaign starts in the CURRENT time period. I was going to have a demi-goddess of discord who liked to travel the Astral Sea looking to increase her powers as a deity. During her travels she would learn how the Primordials 'hid' the secrets of the cosmos (ie, unlimited power) inside the creation of the world. To retrive it, she means to destroy everything, including the entire planet and probably the feywild and shadowlands along with it. To do so, she plans on using the Primordial powers that are scattered throughout the land (probably raising the Primordial of Disease, or something to that nature...still fleshing it out).

The players (from levels 1+) have been stopping local threats always with a common tie that will eventually lead back to this demigoddess (although the players wont know that till levels 11+ish). To find her true motives, the players must obtain knowledge from way back into the Primordials Wars. They will come across a Ritual that will allow them to 'revisit' strong events in history. They will know this ritual will be dangerous, however, as it ties their spirits to the memories of a raging war-torn past.

After a few quests of finding the correct components (such as, say an artifact from a giant camp that dates back to their creation, etc), the players will enact the ritual. This ritual doesn't just show them the events, but actually transports their wills into the bodies of certain key persons in the old Wars. I will be giving them either alternate characters (probably levels 28+ish) or maybe even stats from a monster entry (Angel of Vengence or something more powerful). They will share the wills and the memories of these creatures and will play out a key battle or two in these new personas.

After a session or two, the players will come back (more experienced) to their old selves and, with new information gained to help find/stop the goddess, will attempt to stop the destruction of the world. This should take them through their paragon levels just fighting off her minions and what not till a final chase-showdown in the epic levels....

Those are just my thoughts and plans. Also, according the what I saw in the Worlds and Monsters preview, I got the impression that the Primordials were fewer in number than the gods and MUCH more powerful. Thats my take.

Another GREAT resource for this sort of campaign is the Swords and Sorcery 3.5 product based around the Scarred Lands. It had the same theme and some GREAT history to it. It is scattered across several books (the Scarred Lands MM is the best I think, then a world book, an item book., etc). You should be able to find them cheap at a used bookstore about now.....

Heres some info on it! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scarred_Lands
Those are just my thoughts and plans. Also, according the what I saw in the Worlds and Monsters preview, I got the impression that the Primordials were fewer in number than the gods and MUCH more powerful. Thats my take.

Aye I've just re-read Worlds & Monsters (and it answered my ponderings above, oops) and it certainly seems so - a few Gods to take down a Primordial
My idea was to set it halfway through the war. Some dwarves have managed to lead themselves and other races into rebellion and gained their freedom. However they now live in towns in mountains and are in constant fear of the giants conquering them once more.

The campaign will begin in one such freed town and it'll be up to the players to help keep the town free and thriving (because there's also lots of other dangers besides the giants). Players can be humans, elves, eladrin, drow (elves and eladrin will take a different name but for code purposes this is what they are. They can also be ex-slaves or from a nearby city), half-elf, orcs (who at this stage haven't begun worshipping Gruumsh) and other MM races (who similarly won't be completely evil at this stage). Then as the campaigns go on players will have chances to change history. They could save Io from dying or stop Tharizdan from creating the Abyss or prematurely win the war.
Hey cool, they've converted Exalted to d20 now? :D
Naw, Exalted stole the idea of Primordials from D&D :-) Who stole it from mythology in general but anyway....
Hey cool, they've converted Exalted to d20 now? :D

Lol. Not quite. I made that comment actually when I first noticed a similarity, but no. After doing some research I found that many cultures and many histories dating back to before D&D (and much before Exalted) speaks of powerful elemental forces called Primordials that helped shaped the world. Obviously this has influenced Exalted and D&D in some ways.

Also, in Exalted, the Primordials created the Gods. This is not so in D&D.
Since the Primordials were imprisoned at the end of the War, one could also have a campaign where the Primordials break free. It can begin with a war on the material plane, with giants and titans and other such creatures on the one side and dwarves, humans, elves, and the like on the other. From there the war could escalate all the way up to the Primordials breaking free and the Elemental Chaos waging war with the Astral Sea.
Since the Primordials were imprisoned at the end of the War, one could also have a campaign where the Primordials break free. It can begin with a war on the material plane, with giants and titans and other such creatures on the one side and dwarves, humans, elves, and the like on the other. From there the war could escalate all the way up to the Primordials breaking free and the Elemental Chaos waging war with the Astral Sea.

Using this idea and mixing it with the earlier mentioned time travel idea would work. Primordials break free after ages of imprisonment, they seek to change history so that they won the primordial war. Players try to stop them and fail, so they must go back and fix things?

It's a possibility.
But arent Aboliths supposed to be before, like, every thing *scans LoM*