How will i be able to make a 4th edition adventure today?

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Heyya!

Im a fairly new DM, i played D&D on a "irregular" basis since 2.0 but just the recent 3 years ive been taking the role as a DM. I know the 3.5 rules fairly well, but the problem is we play perhaps 2-3 times per year max and since i have tons of other things going on in my life i tend to forget the rule and i have to brush up from time to time.

The adventures we play are fairly "basic" save X, get item X and so forth. The reason because we play simple adventures are because we usualy decide to play "tomorrow" and there are usualy months betwen our play sessions. So i have to brush up on the rules and make up a adventure pretty much a few hours on the evening before the playday. The players im DM'ing dont seem to mind, we are having fun, but would like to be able to make something diffrent.

Both me and my players are looking forward to DND4 to get released, but since there is about 2 months left ive been thinking about making a adventure before the 4'th edition is released. How can i make "generic" adventure that i can modify when i have the new edition in my hands?

Anyone got any advice? Since im a beginner when it comes to creating adventures all advice and pointers are gladly accepted.

Thanks.
Well with 4E we will all be noobs for the most part again. The only things I can tell you instead of buying all new books right off maybe be the pre-gen advatures they are coming out with for starters.

If your players really like what they see get the new core books. The only other thng I can say is maybe find a new group who can play more together. If that is not in option maybe make up a fact sheet of the most asked questions you get.
With the limited number of "crunchy bits" out there, you're limited in what you can accomplish. If any of the monster types/stats are appealing, you can put them to use, keeping in mind that there may be some changes, minor or otherwise, before they finally gel in print.

Something which I've been doing is to write the campaign focusing on fluff.
* PC background. Immediate area in which they'll begin the adventure.
* Key NPCs. Mentors, masters. (Stats are unimportant at this time, if at all.)
* How and why they begin adventuring. Plot hooks.
* Quest location. Map it out, but if you decide not to use any of the released
creatures, avoid specifics. It's enough to know that the cave is being used
as a lair/hideout by something. You can determine what later.

The "saving X" scenario works with little to no modification, based on the assumption that X is an NPC whose scores and abilities are not germane to the plot. In my opinion, this concept should be rarely embraced anyway. D&D is a PC driven game, not NPC. Regular use of this tactic is the sign of a hack DM.

The "recover item X" scenario could perhaps be a bit trickier, if item X is something which comes from the core rulebooks. If it's a mundane, story-propelling item, no problem. It's simply fluff.

At times, I may be a bit long-winded in my descriptions to the players, attempting to convey atmosphere. Getting others to see the vision that you see is probably the most challenging aspect of being a DM. Virtually any monkey can crunch the numbers, but it's primarily the story that determines whether you're considered a passable DM, or an outstanding one. A referee or a story-teller. And that is largely fluff.
With the limited number of "crunchy bits" out there, you're limited in what you can accomplish. If any of the monster types/stats are appealing, you can put them to use, keeping in mind that there may be some changes, minor or otherwise, before they finally gel in print.

Something which I've been doing is to write the campaign focusing on fluff.
* PC background. Immediate area in which they'll begin the adventure.
* Key NPCs. Mentors, masters. (Stats are unimportant at this time, if at all.)
* How and why they begin adventuring. Plot hooks.
* Quest location. Map it out, but if you decide not to use any of the released
creatures, avoid specifics. It's enough to know that the cave is being used
as a lair/hideout by something. You can determine what later.

The "saving X" scenario works with little to no modification, based on the assumption that X is an NPC whose scores and abilities are not germane to the plot. In my opinion, this concept should be rarely embraced anyway. D&D is a PC driven game, not NPC. Regular use of this tactic is the sign of a hack DM.

The "recover item X" scenario could perhaps be a bit trickier, if item X is something which comes from the core rulebooks. If it's a mundane, story-propelling item, no problem. It's simply fluff.

At times, I may be a bit long-winded in my descriptions to the players, attempting to convey atmosphere. Getting others to see the vision that you see is probably the most challenging aspect of being a DM. Virtually any monkey can crunch the numbers, but it's primarily the story that determines whether you're considered a passable DM, or an outstanding one. A referee or a story-teller. And that is largely fluff.

Thanks for the advice. It was a great idea, i will focus my energy on the quest-area taking some time to make NPC's abit more "living" and fixing up some plot hooks. Cheers!
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