SOFTCOVER!!!!!

49 posts / 0 new
Last post
I couldn't think of anywhere else to put this, so...

FOR THE LOVE OF GOD, WIZARDS, GIVE ME SOFTCOVER BOOKS! SOFTCOVER PLAYER'S HANDBOOK! SOFTCOVER DMG! SOFTCOVER MONSTER MANUAL! SOFTCOVER! SOFTCOVER! SOFTCOVER!

...

...

SOFTCOVER!!

Sorry. I don't usually rant like this. Usually my rants are more witty and involve substantially less capital letters. Having said that, God, I want softcover books. Please. Please please please. That was the biggest thing that made me buy Red Hand of Doom and turned me away from subsequent campaigns. That was the major selling point of the Player's Kit.

Softcover books are cheaper to make. You can therefore make more. They're cheaper to buy. More people will therefore buy them. They're not as durable. More people will therefore need to replace them at some point. Sure that last one is underhanded, but so what?! I'm dyin' over here! I don't have the income necessary to buy hardcover after hardcover after hardcover.

I'm not saying "don't ever make hardcovers." I'm saying, "do what novels do. Initially publish hardcovers, but then go exclusively softcover."

Please?
http://community.wizards.com/go/forum/view/75862/135534/the_praxeum Saga Edition Dungeons and Dragons! An alternative to 4th Edition rules. Post and help build the RPG! You are Red/Blue!
You are Red/Blue!
Take The Magic Dual Colour Test - Beta today!
Created with Rum and Monkey's Personality Test Generator.
div>
You might be an ideal candidate for thier plans to release PDF copies of the books.

You could purchase them, run to Kinkos, get your own copies made, and if you wanted to get really fancy, have them put into a plastic-covered binding. Or a 3-ring binder, or spiral-bound. . .

The cost of printing would be the hardest part to deal with, but, it's an option.
WolfStar76 Community Advocate (SVCL) for D&D Organized Play, Avalon Hill, and the DCI/WPN LFR Community Manager DDi Guide

Created by MyFitnessPal - Free Calorie Counter

You might be an ideal candidate for thier plans to release PDF copies of the books.

You could purchase them, run to Kinkos, get your own copies made, and if you wanted to get really fancy, have them put into a plastic-covered binding. Or a 3-ring binder, or spiral-bound. . .

The cost of printing would be the hardest part to deal with, but, it's an option.

That undermines the who reason to have a soft cover book. Soft cover books are nifty and easier to transport (not a whole lot easier, but easier nonetheless).
That was the major selling point of the Player's Kit.

I agree. I bought the Basic Set and the Players Kit because I wanted a PHB and wanted to learn the game. They came with some other pretty cool stuff if I remember correctly, so they were a good deal overall - I'm sure the softcover PHB kept down the price. The only problem was, I found out I didn't like 3.5!

Anyway, I too wouldn't mind having the books as softcovers later on. I'm excited for 4E, and have a lot of stuff pre-ordered. But it would be nice to get the stuff cheaper later on in order to "beat up" on them a little without making my hardcovers look ugly.
This is just my opinion but for core books i would much rather have hardcover. With softcover books and the amount of book transport that happens weekly going to and from my game i would have a pretty trashed PHB inside a year. Also the spine binding on hardcover tends to be more resiliant.
I play HERO and many of their books are soft cover and of course the 3.0 class books were and i really didn't like it.
That being said it's cheaper to print softcover i believe and i also think a product as big as D&D could support both formats without losing much money... but on the other hand people will buy the hardcover if there is no softcover and then they won't really lose any money.
I also disagree, for novels, softcovers are ok, but for rulebooks like this they aren't durable enough. They get contantly moved around, passed around by players and left open at a page. It's also not hugely more expensive to produce, although that difference gets scaled up obviously when selling it. But this is a one time cost for three books that will last you for a long time. A few extra bucks to get books that will survive that time period is a trivial amount when you really think about it.

If you really can't afford the books then buy a pdf download instead, they're going to be cheaper than the printed books. There's not really any point bringing them gaming anyway IMO. I have long since stopped taking my core books to my D&D sessions, 1 set of core books between all of us is enough. Especially with the new 4E rulebooks as the players don't need anything but the PHB now.
I wouldn't mind the option to knock ten dollars off the cover price.
I'm not saying "don't ever make hardcovers." I'm saying, "do what novels do. Initially publish hardcovers, but then go exclusively softcover."

I am 100% opposed to this last idea. As the owner of a wide collection of frayed and worn softcover games, I would be *extremely* upset if the core books went softcover-only after a while.

Softcovers are fine for modules and infrequently used splatbooks, but hardcovers are essential for books that are "workhorse" tools for the game. I'm sick of books getting damaged by regular use.
Hardcover, I have enough problems with my old strategy guides falling apart, and I carried my 3.0 books with me and read them at school everyday without a problem. I will enjoy having official pdfs now, since I'm never without my laptop
I'm not saying "don't ever make hardcovers." I'm saying, "do what novels do. Initially publish hardcovers, but then go exclusively softcover."

Please?

This is how it has been explained to me:

As soon as you publish a book in softcover, the big book chains stop buying the hardcovers. Like, completely and utterly, and they even ship all the unsold hardcovers back.

In an ideal world, we could publish both, but we have to choose one or the other. Hardcover is more durable, and people tend to carry their D&D books around in backpacks, spill pop on them, bash obnoxious players over the head with them (OK, maybe not), and so on, so we deal in hardcovers.

Sorry! I can sympathize, because I liked my softcover PH from the Player's Kit.

-------------------------------

Answers to rules questions are meant to be helpful advice or insights, not canonical R&D dictates. Treat them as unofficial, but (hopefully) useful.

bash obnoxious players over the head with them (OK, maybe not)

No, no, no, this was very accurate. Very accurate.

In the desert
I saw a creature, naked, bestial,
who, squatting upon the ground,
held his heart in his hands, and ate of it.
I said, "is it good, friend?"
"It is bitter – bitter," he answered;
"but I like it,
"beacuase it is bitter,
"and because it is my heart."

I am 100% opposed to this last idea. As the owner of a wide collection of frayed and worn softcover games, I would be *extremely* upset if the core books went softcover-only after a while.

Take better care of your books. I've had my softcover PHB for a year now and the only damage it's sustained is a very slight tear on the top of the front cover, and I will personally guaruntee that my books take more abuse than any of yours, unless you regularly walk for an hour and a half each week come rain, sleet, or snow to get to your game stop, and then do the same back. The condition a book gets in is entirely the fault of the gamer and not the book.

Softcovers are fine for modules and infrequently used splatbooks, but hardcovers are essential for books that are "workhorse" tools for the game.

Personal experience tells me to say "wrong."

Sorry! I can sympathize, because I liked my softcover PH from the Player's Kit.

*goes and sobs in a corner*

Could maybe publish a good chunk of the non-core stuff in softcover? Maybe?
http://community.wizards.com/go/forum/view/75862/135534/the_praxeum Saga Edition Dungeons and Dragons! An alternative to 4th Edition rules. Post and help build the RPG! You are Red/Blue!
You are Red/Blue!
Take The Magic Dual Colour Test - Beta today!
Created with Rum and Monkey's Personality Test Generator.
div>
Sorry! I can sympathize, because I liked my softcover PH from the Player's Kit.

Well then how about another Player's Kit? Maybe not right away but I can see the merit in it.
The condition a book gets in is entirely the fault of the gamer and not the book.

Entirely? That's nonsense. Anyone who has owned a collection of Palladium soft covers from the 90s knows that for a *fact*. Nothing you could do, save never using a book, would keep the plastic coating on those things. Just reading them at home would damage them.

I know that many of the 2e soft covers were significantly more durable (though some of them had problem with the glue in the binding deteriorating), but I'm spoiled for hard covers. It's very hard to damage a hard cover book without willful or reckless treatment, but soft covers are a different matter, and large soft covers are even worse, especially on the spine.

Furthermore, to blame the user entirely because you managed to preserve yours is bad reasoning. Just because it's *possible* to preserve soft covers while using them frequently doesn't mean that it's *easy* to do so or that it's even practical for the average gamer.

(And what's up with the sudden reversal? Didn't you say: "They're not as durable. More people will therefore need to replace them at some point. Sure that last one is underhanded, but so what?!" Now that someone points out that that's bad, you suddenly say that durability isn't really an issue?)

A return to the days of boxed sets, where there was a protective cover for the books and material could be more easily separated out into thinner, more durable sub-units, might make a difference in my mind, but I doubt you'd save much money that way.
I remember playing In Nomine... all the non-core sourcebooks were paperback. All of them held up just fine...

Except the Angelic Player's Guide. Which my group replaced... oh, eight, nine times. Never did get one that didn't fall apart.
I like the hardcover books .. but I would LOVE to see PDFs for them .. especially some formatted for the smaller eBook reader screens (Sony Reader & Kindle for example)
I like the hard cover books for a goofy reason. I remember starting out with Basic D&D when I was about 8 or so. Later, I was introduced to AD&D and I felt like I had graduated to the big boys league with the hard covers. So, for me, it's like a right of passage to use hard covers.

Plus, I'd tear soft covers to pieces.

Cheers
I'd rather have Hard Cover books, because unlike the truely A-na-l, I wear my books, and softcovers always end up torn, ripped, or worse. Now that being said, a PDF version would be just fine by me as a supplement or another version, just so that you could get a few copies made for use and put them in binding that allow for ease of use.
Furthermore, to blame the user entirely because you managed to preserve yours is bad reasoning. Just because it's *possible* to preserve soft covers while using them frequently doesn't mean that it's *easy* to do so or that it's even practical for the average gamer.

But the point is that I've put my softcover through as much abuse as my hardcovers; I actually don't take any special care of it beyond what I do for my hardcovers - which is to say, none - but my friggin Deities & Demigods is in worse condition.

(And what's up with the sudden reversal? Didn't you say: "They're not as durable. More people will therefore need to replace them at some point. Sure that last one is underhanded, but so what?!" Now that someone points out that that's bad, you suddenly say that durability isn't really an issue?)

Look, I never claimed to be logical. But, at the very least they're at least a bit easier to damage in theory. Perhpas I have the rogue softcover PHB that can't be killed.
http://community.wizards.com/go/forum/view/75862/135534/the_praxeum Saga Edition Dungeons and Dragons! An alternative to 4th Edition rules. Post and help build the RPG! You are Red/Blue!
You are Red/Blue!
Take The Magic Dual Colour Test - Beta today!
Created with Rum and Monkey's Personality Test Generator.
div>
I like the hardcover books .. but I would LOVE to see PDFs for them .. especially some formatted for the smaller eBook reader screens (Sony Reader & Kindle for example)

QFT

I here ya. I'd totally be sold on a Kindle if I could have all your D&D books on that thing. Not just a rules database like DDI, but the full books. Having your whole D&D collection on one little device would be sweet.
You might be an ideal candidate for thier plans to release PDF copies of the books.

You could purchase them, run to Kinkos, get your own copies made, and if you wanted to get really fancy, have them put into a plastic-covered binding. Or a 3-ring binder, or spiral-bound. . .

The cost of printing would be the hardest part to deal with, but, it's an option.


Ok, I wouldn't normally say something like this, but I work for Kinko's, and what you're suggesting drives me nuts. It breaks copyright law and it's not the poor Kinko's employee's fault. It's not his job to break the law for you.


Sorry about that...been yelled at one too many times over that.

go 4ed
QFT

I here ya. I'd totally be sold on a Kindle if I could have all your D&D books on that thing. Not just a rules database like DDI, but the full books. Having your whole D&D collection on one little device would be sweet.

Supposedly the Kindle is completely tanking...what an opportunity. If WotC teamed up with Amazon for Kindle-friendly rulebooks and a bit of a discount on the Kindle, I can see the D&D community collectively I]true resurrecting[/i] the Kindle single-handedly!
Hardcover, softcover - that doesn't matter so much to me: what matters is the binding
I've had hardcover books that popped pages out after a few weeks, and softcover which hold up fine over years of use.
I don't think that this a good idea.

I dislike softcover for books that are going to be used heavily. And don't tell me about being careful. I am the most careful person that I know of when it comes to books. But the problem is that Core Rulebooks are more often then not used by the entire group (especially during the session). So it not only about how you treat the book but also about how the people at the table would treat it. And that's when you are on the safe(r) side with a hardcover.
This is how it has been explained to me:

As soon as you publish a book in softcover, the big book chains stop buying the hardcovers. Like, completely and utterly, and they even ship all the unsold hardcovers back.

In an ideal world, we could publish both, but we have to choose one or the other. Hardcover is more durable, and people tend to carry their D&D books around in backpacks, spill pop on them, bash obnoxious players over the head with them (OK, maybe not), and so on, so we deal in hardcovers.

Sorry! I can sympathize, because I liked my softcover PH from the Player's Kit.

Why do they do that? The only reason I can think of is soft cover books sell better. Booksellers are businessmen, and they aren't going to stock their shelves with two versions of one book when one outsells the others. If hardback books outperformed softcovers, they would ship softcovers back. Why not give gamers what they want. We want soft covers.

And Enlightened1 hit the nail on the head. My softcover 2e Combat and Tactics book is in far better shape than my hardbound Midnight Campaign setting book. The binding is the thing.

Ok, I wouldn't normally say something like this, but I work for Kinko's, and what you're suggesting drives me nuts. It breaks copyright law and it's not the poor Kinko's employee's fault. It's not his job to break the law for you.


Sorry about that...been yelled at one too many times over that.

go 4ed

Actually you might want to talk to your manager about that. While it is illegal to print an illegal scan of a book, I am fairly certain it is perfectly legal to print out a legal ebook that you own. Especially if it is for personal use only.

Now your manager might make the perfectly valid point of "we can't tell who is doing this legally and who is not, sorry no one can do it" and there really isn't anything that can be done. He has a very good arguement.

As for the topic at hand, I would love if they put the core books out in hardcover, and then the rest in soft.

My core phb has the same problems many people's soft cover books seem to have. Needless to say I am rough on my things. I expect that they were made so Jo 60IQ can do whatever he wants to them without them breaking, because the company fears a lawsuit. I figure he can do way worse than anything I can do to it, and usually am right. If not I return said item saying it broke under normal use.

I would though love if the adventures were done in soft cover. I might even pick one or two up and buy them. As is I am not willing to pay the cost of a hardbacked one, but if the cost drops enough I might buy a few.

"In a way, you are worse than Krusk"                               " As usual, Krusk comments with assuredness, but lacks the clarity and awareness of what he's talking about"

"Can't say enough how much I agree with Krusk"        "Wow, thank you very much"

"Your advice is the worst"

I would though love if the adventures were done in soft cover. I might even pick one or two up and buy them. As is I am not willing to pay the cost of a hardbacked one, but if the cost drops enough I might buy a few.

That's been getting at me. Do they really sell enough hardbound modules to make it even worth it? I don't know anyone who's ever bought one.

Ok, I wouldn't normally say something like this, but I work for Kinko's, and what you're suggesting drives me nuts. It breaks copyright law and it's not the poor Kinko's employee's fault. It's not his job to break the law for you.


Sorry about that...been yelled at one too many times over that.

go 4ed

It depends on what WotC says you're allowed to do with the books, actually. If the PDF states that you're allowed to reproduce it for personal use (which seems reasonable) there's no law being broken. (You could even make a convincing argument about a printed copy constituting a "backup" which is allowed.)

And that permission was part of my assumption (though, I should have stated as such).

By far and large, however, you're right, and I'd like to make it clear that I don't advocate copyright violations.

Krusk may also have a point about it simply falling under "fair use".

As for Kinkos being the arbiter as to whether my use is legal or not. . . that's a greyer area. I could see why Kinkos wouldn't want their employees hitting "print" (or even "copy") on my behalf to make the potentially illegal hardcopy to avoid liability, but if its ME doing it, that's my liability.

Binding that hardcopy once its already printed should be a non-issue, but IANAL and YMMV.

(EDIT)

I actually work for an Intellectual Property law firm. I think I'mma pester an attorney for his thoughts on this later today. Of course, it won't be the definitive answer (blah blah blah - opinion only, seek your own legal counsel, blah blah blah), but now my curiosity is piqued.

If anyone else is curious on the response I get, let me know and I'll post it to share.
WolfStar76 Community Advocate (SVCL) for D&D Organized Play, Avalon Hill, and the DCI/WPN LFR Community Manager DDi Guide

Created by MyFitnessPal - Free Calorie Counter

Why do they do that? The only reason I can think of is soft cover books sell better. Booksellers are businessmen, and they aren't going to stock their shelves with two versions of one book when one outsells the others. If hardback books outperformed softcovers, they would ship softcovers back. Why not give gamers what they want. We want soft covers.

No "we" do not. I am a hardcover fan, so I would prefer you not try and speak for me on this subject.

Adventures? Sure. Those are less durable by their nature. You run them once, and then just use them for little bits of info here or there, maybe trading it in to a store for a little credit on a different adventure.

But I want my rules in hardcover.
No "we" do not. I am a hardcover fan, so I would prefer you not try and speak for me on this subject.

Adventures? Sure. Those are less durable by their nature. You run them once, and then just use them for little bits of info here or there, maybe trading it in to a store for a little credit on a different adventure.

But I want my rules in hardcover.

Considering that the facts seem to indicate most gamers prefer soft covers, I stand by my statement.
I couldn't think of anywhere else to put this, so...

FOR THE LOVE OF GOD, WIZARDS, GIVE ME SOFTCOVER BOOKS! SOFTCOVER PLAYER'S HANDBOOK! SOFTCOVER DMG! SOFTCOVER MONSTER MANUAL! SOFTCOVER! SOFTCOVER! SOFTCOVER!

...

...

SOFTCOVER!!

Sorry. I don't usually rant like this. Usually my rants are more witty and involve substantially less capital letters. Having said that, God, I want softcover books. Please. Please please please. That was the biggest thing that made me buy Red Hand of Doom and turned me away from subsequent campaigns. That was the major selling point of the Player's Kit.

Softcover books are cheaper to make. You can therefore make more. They're cheaper to buy. More people will therefore buy them. They're not as durable. More people will therefore need to replace them at some point. Sure that last one is underhanded, but so what?! I'm dyin' over here! I don't have the income necessary to buy hardcover after hardcover after hardcover.

I'm not saying "don't ever make hardcovers." I'm saying, "do what novels do. Initially publish hardcovers, but then go exclusively softcover."

Please?

If your haveing trouble with the price of $25-$35 books for your hobby you have a big problem, because I can think of fiew things you can do as a hobby which cost less with most costing much more.
I'm usually pretty carefull with my books. The option to spend ten less dollars would greatly apeal to my dusty wallet.
Considering that the facts seem to indicate most gamers prefer soft covers, I stand by my statement.

What "facts"? A few posters on a thread that has just managed to start a second page?
Hardly a cross-section of the boards, let alone the playing public.

And for those that think that softcovers would cost X less than the hardcovers, what do you think when they don't? What is the minimum amount of savings you would have to see before you switched from hardcover to softcover? You can't just assume that the price will drop by the amount you expect it will. If softcovers were $1.00 less than the hardcovers would you think it was worth it?
What kind of damage do you think softcovers would have sitting on the shelves in the big bookstores after being thumbed through by person after person, not to mention books being picked out and put back in the rack, especially if they are organized as if they were a book on a library shelf and slid between other books? Would you be willing to pick up a book if it were damaged? How does it help the bookstore decide to keep carrying the product if you don't? How does it help attract new players if the books they see are damaged, meaning they decide not to try the game out?
What "facts"? A few posters on a thread that has just managed to start a second page?
Hardly a cross-section of the boards, let alone the playing public.

The fact that a member of the WotC staff has said that when soft cover books are available, book sellers refuse to stock hard cover versions. This implies that they find it easier to make a profit with soft cover books. This implies that soft cover books sell better. This implies that gamers prefer soft cover books. The facts are pretty clear on this.

And for those that think that softcovers would cost X less than the hardcovers, what do you think when they don't? What is the minimum amount of savings you would have to see before you switched from hardcover to softcover? You can't just assume that the price will drop by the amount you expect it will. If softcovers were $1.00 less than the hardcovers would you think it was worth it?
What kind of damage do you think softcovers would have sitting on the shelves in the big bookstores after being thumbed through by person after person, not to mention books being picked out and put back in the rack, especially if they are organized as if they were a book on a library shelf and slid between other books? Would you be willing to pick up a book if it were damaged? How does it help the bookstore decide to keep carrying the product if you don't? How does it help attract new players if the books they see are damaged, meaning they decide not to try the game out?

I would pay the same amount of money for hard or soft covers. Half a dozen soft cover books are much easier to transport than half a dozen hard cover books. I would guess most people would expect to pay about $10 less. $1 is a ridiculous amount. WotC would never be able to justify a $1 drop, as they save far more than this in production.

Soft cover books for rpgs, and even dnd, are not new territory. In store damage never seemed to be a problem before, I don't see why it would be now.
The fact that a member of the WotC staff has said that when soft cover books are available, book sellers refuse to stock hard cover versions. This implies that they find it easier to make a profit with soft cover books. This implies that soft cover books sell better. This implies that gamers prefer soft cover books. The facts are pretty clear on this.

Actually, I would say your making a rather large jump to that conclusion. Id say its more general bookstore policy. Bookstores sell more softcovers in general so they order softcovers over hardcovers in every category. I think thats a more reasonable explanation then claiming that one small section of the store proves this or that.
Actually, I would say your making a rather large jump to that conclusion. Id say its more general bookstore policy. Bookstores sell more softcovers in general so they order softcovers over hardcovers in every category. I think thats a more reasonable explanation then claiming that one small section of the store proves this or that.

I don't consider it a large jump at all. A quick stroll through a bookstore will quickly reveal that they do indeed carry many books in both hard and soft cover. Add to that fact that most sales probably go through game stores rather than book stores.
Just by looking at this, I would not claim to know how WotC sets their prices.
$24.95 for a 64 page softcover? Would that mean that a 128 page softcover would cost $49.90?

When you can present an actual WotC spokesman saying how much they would charge for a paperback PHB, MM, and DMG, then I will claim to know how much they cost. Until that time, I would not be so dismissive of how much savings a paperback would, or would not, offer.
I don't consider it a large jump at all. A quick stroll through a bookstore will quickly reveal that they do indeed carry many books in both hard and soft cover. Add to that fact that most sales probably go through game stores rather than book stores.

In comparison to their overall product, id say its more like some or few in both versions. As for game stores, my personal opinion is that they dont do the business of the bookstores. Considering the online presence with discounts, the coupons offered from the major chains and that in many areas there are few to no gamestores while the same area will have a couple of the big names, id think that they do more through bookstores, tho it might not be significantly more. Just this week I saved 20 bucks by not going to my not-so-local game store (not counting fuel) and hitting a Boders instead,

Id rather support a local store, but with one not nearby and significant differences in prices, its just not feasible for me
The fact that a member of the WotC staff has said that when soft cover books are available, book sellers refuse to stock hard cover versions. This implies that they find it easier to make a profit with soft cover books. This implies that soft cover books sell better. This implies that gamers prefer soft cover books. The facts are pretty clear on this.

Warning: Critical reasoning error!

You assume that the market for books that commonly go to softcover (e.g. novels, most non-fiction, etc.) is the same as the market for heavily used reference manuals, like RPG books. This is not factually supported by what was said.

Personally, I never buy hardcover novels, preferring to wait for them to come out in paperback for many reasons. I don't typically reread all but a handful of novels that I own, so they don't need to be durable. I'm part of the problem there, but that's not true for RPGs.

In contrast, I would ask you what percentage of college textbooks you've seen that were available in paperback format? Few are available because the size & form factor and the usage patterns aren't favorable to the kind of abuse that a softcover would take.

It's simply utility at heart here. Hardback fiction is preferred by the early adopters, the rabid fans who want to keep and treasure a book. People who are just casually interested will be happy with a paperback to read once. Hardback reference manuals are still useful to any purchaser because they'll be read again and again, unlike most other books.

At least in my experience.
Warning: Critical reasoning error!

You assume that the market for books that commonly go to softcover (e.g. novels, most non-fiction, etc.) is the same as the market for heavily used reference manuals, like RPG books. This is not factually supported by what was said.

They send back hard cover rpg books when soft covers are available. That has nothing to do with novels. Booksellers know what rpg books are, to the point that some booksellers have told me they won't carry them because they're more likely to be shoplifted.

In contrast, I would ask you what percentage of college textbooks you've seen that were available in paperback format? Few are available because the size & form factor and the usage patterns aren't favorable to the kind of abuse that a softcover would take.

Outside of heavy duty 1,000+ page technical manuals, I'd say about 90% of my texts have been soft cover. I've only been out of school for 2 years, so I doubt it's changed much.

My experience has actually been that well made softcovers outlast hardbound books. Hardbound books seem to be more prone to coming apart at the bindings.
My experience has actually been that well made softcovers outlast hardbound books. Hardbound books seem to be more prone to coming apart at the bindings.

All yolu need to prove this is the older White Wolf hardcovers, they were notorious for their bad bindings.

I like my core books in hardcover, but I dont need adventures and other refernce material in hardcover. They get used less and I find it much easier to find something in a softcover for some reason, and easier to read.

Ive known many bookstores (mainly the chains) that had no idea what the rpg books were at all, so thats gonna be a case by case basis. It would beinteresting if someone had the sales figures on 2 versions (1 paperback and 1 hardcover) from the past that we could compare.

MY belief is that companies get just a little more markup selling hardcovers so they prefer to make them. This isnt necessarily bad as it generally means they have to fill more pages with goodness (I absolutely cant stand those that put out 100 page hardcovers) Around the time 3.0 came out there was a huge push into the hardcover format and I think part of this was that the industry as a whole wasnt doing their best at that time. Things seem to have improved somewhat and more places seem to be putting out hardcovers. WW has their new clan books in softcover and I hope that it catches on again.