Miniature Packs

35 posts / 0 new
Last post
Has there been any talk of publishing associated miniature packs for the official adventure modules? A single product that contains the miniatures needed for each of that module's encounters?

If not, I think that is a good area to think about. With the stress placed on the tabletop, I would welcome a product such as this.
Has there been any talk of publishing associated miniature packs for the official adventure modules? A single product that contains the miniatures needed for each of that module's encounters?

If not, I think that is a good area to think about. With the stress placed on the tabletop, I would welcome a product such as this.

It's come up before, but it's unlikely. I would like it if they tried it at least once just to confirm if it's a failure or not, but that wouldn't be overly fair to the stores that would have to decide whether or not to stock an experiment.

In the desert
I saw a creature, naked, bestial,
who, squatting upon the ground,
held his heart in his hands, and ate of it.
I said, "is it good, friend?"
"It is bitter – bitter," he answered;
"but I like it,
"beacuase it is bitter,
"and because it is my heart."

I'd like some boxes of non randomized figures - like the Orcs, goblins, or just one of various "heroes" - I hate the whole "collectable"/"random" bit. I guess I'll have to stick to eBay until they do something else
The closest thing I have seen to this is some Star Wars miniatures packs that are complete scenarios, but they are for the mini game.

I picked up a Battle for Hoth pack at Target at Christmas time and it was very nice.

I agree, having miniature packs for D&D adventures would be excellent. The short adventures they have had with maps, Fantastic Locations, have already been useful for me. The Fields of Ruin was quite nice. Adding minis would enhance things even more.
The closest thing I have seen to this is some Star Wars miniatures packs that are complete scenarios, but they are for the mini game.

I picked up a Battle for Hoth pack at Target at Christmas time and it was very nice.

I agree, having miniature packs for D&D adventures would be excellent. The short adventures they have had with maps, Fantastic Locations, have already been useful for me. The Fields of Ruin was quite nice. Adding minis would enhance things even more.

I REALLY wanted the HotH pack from Target - but could not justify the $60.00 to the wife ;) I just like having a variety of models so that I can put out 8 or 10 Orcs - and not say "Ok this Ghoul is also an orc" I'm a dork that way I guess. While I don't press my players for WYSIWYG I do try to do that when I run.
Wouldn't this cause a limiting of the diversity in an adventure?

Fewer types of monsters, so that useability will work better. Like "Keep on the Boarderlands" had every kind of goblinoid, several large animals, and one or more BBGs in five different finales. My guess you need more than 40 monster figs for that scenario.
But if one didn't need divercity, just fighting orcs twenty times would be fine.

How many figures do you think they should have?
GAMMA WORLD Wuv D&D: Beyond the RPG - Transcript This is a complete transcript. http://community.wizards.com/go/thread/view/75882/22329697?sdb=1&pg=last#390668593 The audio file is in this News Archive http://www.wizards.com/DnD/Article.aspx?x=dnd/4news/DNDXP 2010 D&D Product Overview (47 minutes into the Audio) http://community.wizards.com/go/thread/view/75882/22329697?sdb=1&pg=last#390928045
I'd like some boxes of non randomized figures - like the Orcs, goblins, or just one of various "heroes" - I hate the whole "collectable"/"random" bit. I guess I'll have to stick to eBay until they do something else

You may also want to try miniaturemarket.com. They sell individual minis from all of the sets, as well as booster packs and cases. Good prices, prompt delivery. We now return to your regularly scheduled forum.
Fewer types of monsters, so that useability will work better. Like "Keep on the Boarderlands" had every kind of goblinoid, several large animals, and one or more BBGs in five different finales. My guess you need more than 40 monster figs for that scenario.

It is true that it will not work for adventures with a huge variety of encounter types.

I have started taking a more economical approach to my minis - I print out images (found on the web) within a 1 inch circle, cut them out, and glue them on the top of plastic soda bottle tops. It may be a little cheesy but it lets me have miniatures that look like what the players are fighting without buying hundreds of minis. ;)

In addition, recently I have received tokens from Aleatools, I have even better ways to cut out the tokens and can put them on top of disks that are exactly the right size.

It is not as nice as having the real thing, but it works well!

I decided to do this after wanting to run a war using the rules in the Miniatures Handbook, and I wanted an epic battle having hundreds and hundreds of soliders and orcs, as in Lord of the Rings meets the Bloodstone Wars. Although they give you nice templates in the back to form your units, the rules in that book actually expect you to have one mini per soldier. Of course I was not going to buy that many minis!
The big problem we'd face with this kind of product lies in the production issues that crop up. If you look at the Star Wars scenario packs, like the Battle of Hoth, they come with previously released miniatures.

When we do a D&D miniatures set, we design a lot more minis than we actually need. Many figures fall short in art, sculpt, or paints, requiring us to start all over from the beginning with that fig. For a set that ties to an adventure, we don't have any wiggle room. If the miniature for the main villain doesn't work out, we have to scrap the entire product or push it back at least a few months.

On the flip side, we could do a pack that featured only minis we have done before, but that runs into big problem. If the minis are already out there, how many people want to buy figures they already own?

However, this is something that we've talked about a lot. We'd like to do it, but it is by no means an easy feat to pull off.

-------------------------------

Answers to rules questions are meant to be helpful advice or insights, not canonical R&D dictates. Treat them as unofficial, but (hopefully) useful.

...

However, this is something that we've talked about a lot. We'd like to do it, but it is by no means an easy feat to pull off.

I see how it could be a problem. That said, I would definitely purchase the "module-specific" minis sets if they were to become available. I'm all about the published adventures, and I'd like to get into minis, but the current means of acquiring the ones I want is not appealing...

Anyway, thanks for the response!
The big problem we'd face with this kind of product lies in the production issues that crop up. If you look at the Star Wars scenario packs, like the Battle of Hoth, they come with previously released miniatures.

When we do a D&D miniatures set, we design a lot more minis than we actually need. Many figures fall short in art, sculpt, or paints, requiring us to start all over from the beginning with that fig. For a set that ties to an adventure, we don't have any wiggle room. If the miniature for the main villain doesn't work out, we have to scrap the entire product or push it back at least a few months.

On the flip side, we could do a pack that featured only minis we have done before, but that runs into big problem. If the minis are already out there, how many people want to buy figures they already own?

However, this is something that we've talked about a lot. We'd like to do it, but it is by no means an easy feat to pull off.

For some reason, I beg to differ. AS a "mini's are a must in my game type of guy", I like to use monsters only if I have the mini. By simply using minis from previous sets, you not only give us an older mini, but an adventure as well.

These types of adventures would be the same as those ran like Worldwide D&D Gameday.
The big problem we'd face with this kind of product lies in the production issues that crop up. If you look at the Star Wars scenario packs, like the Battle of Hoth, they come with previously released miniatures.

When we do a D&D miniatures set, we design a lot more minis than we actually need. Many figures fall short in art, sculpt, or paints, requiring us to start all over from the beginning with that fig. For a set that ties to an adventure, we don't have any wiggle room. If the miniature for the main villain doesn't work out, we have to scrap the entire product or push it back at least a few months.

On the flip side, we could do a pack that featured only minis we have done before, but that runs into big problem. If the minis are already out there, how many people want to buy figures they already own?

However, this is something that we've talked about a lot. We'd like to do it, but it is by no means an easy feat to pull off.

Thank you for the response!

Another option addressing production issues would be to more closely tie an adventure path to a miniature set release. A new module that focuses on the same theme as the newest DDM expansion. That way you are not using old miniatures, are improving cross-product ties, and are reducing the production risks you talk about. Of coures then the writers have to work closely with the DDM production team...but is that such a bad thing?

Something to think about.
What I would love to see is a Starter “Staring” The Village of Homlet [or something else]
Contains
•Quick Start Rules
•PHB
•Dice
•Maps of the Moat House
•4 PC Figures
•2-10 Bandits [Different]
•1-4 Ghouls
•2-12 Zombies
•2-8 Bugebears
•2-8 Gnolls
•1 Large Lizard
•1 Large Spider
•1 Huge Snake
•1 Ogre
•1 Evil Cleric
Not all monsters really need to scale miniatures though. That would allow you to sell a module with a normal version, an extended version, and a deluxe version. The normal version would have no minis, the extended(or any better word) would come with colored tokens with drawings of faces on them, or for large+ monsters colored plastic squares with drawings of creatures on them. The deluxe version would have actual minis. Since I personally find poker chips a nice thing to use, so stuff like poker chips, but smoothed down, and with a face in the middle would be cool. About the thickness of a quarter and the surface area of a nickel. So if someone wants to spend a dollar on 20 orc minis, they would get 20 smooth, plastic, red chips with engravings on them full of black ink. If they want to spend 10 dollars, then they get plastic orc minis. At 20, they might get pewter.

Monster tokens would also be colored differently from player tokens. They might all be darker, or all be paler, or just primary colors, white, and black. All the other colors would be for players.

Although if people really want miniatures, there is always the possibility of a thick piece of wood from a nearby tree trimming, and a moto-dremel tool. Or that bakeable modeling clay stuff.
Of coures then the writers have to work closely with the DDM production team...but is that such a bad thing?

Maybe... they do kind do smell bad. :D

It's funny that Darkarcher736 mentioned the Worldwide D&D Game Day adventures, because whenever we get those in the office we end up brainstorming ideas to do exactly that sort of thing as a for sale adventure.

Really, now that I think about, the trickiest thing is the risk. It'd be a lot more time and money intensive to coordinate things across minis production, plus shipping minis from overseas, plus bundling the package together.

When I did a lot of work on minis (I focus much more on RPG stuff now), I was always suprised at how complicated and expensive easily overlooked stuff like packaging and shipping can be. The prices go up fast, and you need to sell a lot more copies to turn a profit.

So, it's something we talk about in R&D, but there are a number of boring, business-type obstacles in the way. Everyone agrees it would be cool, but implementing it is tough.

In a way, the game day adventures illustrate that point pretty well: we can do an adventure and minis in a package, but we have to accept that we're doing it for free as a promotional thing, and the package is (I believe) hand assembled in our warehouse and shipped in a plain, brown box.

One of the interesting things of the business side of games is that stuff like packaging, is really, really important to distributors and stores. If a box is ugly or doesn't sell the product, it's hard to get Joe Gamer to look at it. If you look at the Hoth pack again, the packaging is designed to show off the miniatures. If the Hoth miniatures were all stuck in a brown box with the word Hoth stamped on it, no sane store would stock it!

Now, with all that said, we have a new starter set for D&D Miniatures coming out that has some really slick (IMO) packaging that shows off the minis. We'll definitely be keeping an eye on sales numbers and feedback from retailers to see how it goes over.

-------------------------------

Answers to rules questions are meant to be helpful advice or insights, not canonical R&D dictates. Treat them as unofficial, but (hopefully) useful.

There also seems to be the impetus for incremental sales:

Adventure one corresponds to pack one.
Adventure two in the same series uses minis from pack one for much of the recurring fodder but adds minis, encouraging further buy in.

Just a thought.
Maybe... they do kind do smell bad. :D

In a way, the game day adventures illustrate that point pretty well: we can do an adventure and minis in a package, but we have to accept that we're doing it for free as a promotional thing, and the package is (I believe) hand assembled in our warehouse and shipped in a plain, brown box.

That is actually very close to what I was thinking. Not actually doing the full packaging, and distribution work. A customer purchases the adventure, an add or insert in back is how to special order a miniature pack for that adventure. As well as a findable product in an online store. No changes are required to the current 'boring business stuff' for either the miniature or the adventure portions of the business. The big issue is whether inventory management could handle it. (Plus it is about the lowest-risk method of testing the marketplace --- Just trying to help! =P)

btw...kudos on the new DDM starter set. What I've seen of it (from the rulebook download) appears to be very well done...contents, AND packaging. I am just waiting to see them on the shelves to purchase one for my son.
IMO it's an untapped (well I suppose not "un" tapped but a neglected one) market. I'm not buying random boosters to get the minis I need so Reaper is getting a significant chunk of cash from me as a result of picking up 4e.

I would gladly buy 95% of my minis from WotC if they were available and save the unpainted metal purchases for characters and boss monsters.
....

Really, now that I think about, the trickiest thing is the risk. It'd be a lot more time and money intensive to coordinate things across minis production, plus shipping minis from overseas, plus bundling the package together.

When I did a lot of work on minis (I focus much more on RPG stuff now), I was always suprised at how complicated and expensive easily overlooked stuff like packaging and shipping can be. The prices go up fast, and you need to sell a lot more copies to turn a profit.

So, it's something we talk about in R&D, but there are a number of boring, business-type obstacles in the way. Everyone agrees it would be cool, but implementing it is tough.

In a way, the game day adventures illustrate that point pretty well: we can do an adventure and minis in a package, but we have to accept that we're doing it for free as a promotional thing, and the package is (I believe) hand assembled in our warehouse and shipped in a plain, brown box.

One of the interesting things of the business side of games is that stuff like packaging, is really, really important to distributors and stores. If a box is ugly or doesn't sell the product, it's hard to get Joe Gamer to look at it. If you look at the Hoth pack again, the packaging is designed to show off the miniatures. If the Hoth miniatures were all stuck in a brown box with the word Hoth stamped on it, no sane store would stock it!
....

Mike,
I agree that most individuals do not realize just how much it takes to produce and distribute something. Although I do wonder to what degree individuals do not purchase mini's simply because they believe they won't get what they need without spending an arm and a leg. I would love a basic set...goblins, orcs, lizardmen, skeletons, some npc classes. Mini's for creatures you typically fight in groups versus the custom unique enemy encounters. I realize that the opposite side is that those that have them won't buy them, however they wouldn't either way.

I wonder if issues such as those you described might be partially avoided if you went with an alternate premise. Consider some people won't want mini's prepackaged with the adventure and some will. So you take care of that by it being a separate option. Next you say packaging in "glam" for the retailer, who says it has to be truly retail to begin with? Why spend the money for a 1 shot wonder or take the risk of making huge numbers of the product. First use existing models. But what is wrong with the brown ugly box if it is not a retail, up on the shelf, product. How then? I don't know why but the first thing I thought of was the old "toys" you could order off the back of an old cereal box or collecting UPC's etc. Why not add a small like there is with the satisfaction surveys you sometimes add to products (yes, cost there) or a note that says go to this website and order it.

You pay a small cost for the product, packing (by hand it may cost a bit but the bigger issue may be just how many you may get, if its big it could mean much more and the short term annoyance may lead you to something more substantial), and shipping.

Then only those that find it valuable will purchase it but it is with products you already have and with a low cost alternative. For those, that can't wait 2-8 weeks maybe retailers will have a stash of "pick up here" boxes they can choose to stock but are not normal retail products.

I hate offering ideas when there are thousands of considerations and options, but there is something about the "decoder ring" style that would appear to work without a significant amount of added hassle.

Just thinking out loud.
Lasciate ogne speranza, voi ch'intrate. "Abandon all hope ye who enter here." A child of 5 could understand this, someone bring me a child of 5.
I collect a LOT of duplicate minis off of ebay, or local friends. I have a good 20 random orc, dwarves and the like for my needs.

To be honest, I'm not 100% worried about the fancy paint. I obvisously don't want garbage, but I don't need to see the individual chain links in their mail.

But, what really annoys me is the lack of figures, due to the randomness of the DDM game and the price of trying to get something for my RPG that has value in the DDM game, making the going price $30+. I'd be very happy with a print of minis for the MM in a MM set, 1 of each, then release them in boxed sets or low priced individuals.

I so often have to say "this skeleton here is actually a ...."

Now that it reads that so much of 4E is mini designed, this seems like a good opertunity to produce a series of minis that are NOT DDM legal. Heck, you don't even have to provide cards IMO, just reference the book and page on the bottom (MM 123).

I know, maybe its not a good business venture. But it solves the competition with DDM issue, prevents over flood of figures for DDM and allows DDM boosters to remain random.

∴ "Virtus junxit, mors non separabit." 

Duplicate "old" miniatures in static sets would be perfectly fine -- as long as they get a bit of a re-painting so they end up being "different" from ones we may own already.

If I have one Orc Warrior from set ABC with a falchion and black and silver armor, then there is still value in an Orc Warrior with a falchion from set XYZ as long as it has bronze and red armor (or whatever) because they can be told apart from each other.

And honestly, if you have ever looked at buying some of the older minis -- for example Beholders, Giants and named characters like Elminster and Drizzt -- you will see that they easily can go into $20-$30 each. They are expensive because they are out of print, never to be seen again.

This means if I wanted to run a Beholder encounter, I would not even have the option of using a Beholder miniature if I didn't get it during the time it was released originally. Even a Gauth is like $55. Buying a bunch of old booster packs for the slight chance of finding the mini I want is similarly not something I am interested in engaging in.

Currently, when a new set comes out, I buy a single Booster pack for it. I then assess what miniatures I ended up getting, and then am basically forced to buy singles from online sellers. I have no interest in multiple "common" miniatures (who thought up this stupid card game mechanic? Anyone can just assemble any DDM team they want by shopping around a little, this "common" "rare" stuff is just WOTC Magic Cards B.S.) which look exactly the same because then it is hard to tell them apart in a combat.

Odds are, if I bought more than one booster pack I would have multiples of certain minis, and several I would never in a million years use or get the chance to use for what it actually represents.

I bought the Basic Game boxes because they contained "old" miniatures that became really expensive, and because they were static sets.

My solution for WOTC in regards to this miniatures packing/shipping/sculpting issue would be what I think they are going to do with the "virtual" minis -- sell them individually or in batches. At the least, reprinting older models would be great because most of the work is done on their end, and it makes particular singles much cheaper on my end (hopefully).
http://community.wizards.com/go/thread/view/75882/19670890/Keep_on_the_Shadowfell_Character_Errata
In response to WotC_Mearls, I guess the risk involved in bothering the costumer by "recycling" old miniatures can be seen differently. As several people have stated, and I will add up to their argument, you'll be reaching a whole new market, that of the people who want to use miniatures in their games, but aren't willing to spend a lot of money building a collection when all they want is a regular group of PCs and monsters for gameplay.

And, by offering this "recycled set" with all the basics for play, you can even bring new people to the minis market. I, for example, would feel a lot more encouraged to get a random booster to add up to my collection once I already had a good basic set of minis, but I just don't feel it's worth it right now since I'd need to buy a whole lot of them to just have the ones I need to play.

And, also, to the regular minis collector it would hardly be bad to have an old set of repeated figures, since, probably, he does not own all of them or will at least have more spare minis whenever he needs, let's say, more skeletons for the adventure.

As you people always say, options are never a bad thing ;)

I'm just trying to help you guys with my view as as a costumer, and, by the posts in this thread I guess there's a lot more people who think the same way I do.
I understand there are a lot of good reasons for random packs.

What I would like to see is packs divided by Teir. Heroic Packs, Paragon Packs, and Epic packs. That way I don't end up with a monster that I can't bring to the game table for months.

Right now I'm torn between Desert of Desolation because it looks really cool, and I'd really like a Cube, or the new Dungeons of Dread, because I feel it has a lot of models my players might represent themselves with plus some good basic monsters.
I suppose. I just think that you should also be able to buy sets. And you should be able to buy the little tokens I mentioned earlier(colors, with pictures of the mosnters face etched in, and cheaper than minis). Those could be sold in random packs, shaped like the coins in the little paper rolls.
You could do this a different route all together. Make the "adventure packs" something like the Bag O' Zombies with relatively cheap packaging. Just have all the monsters one needs for the adventure in there, and name them after the adventure like "H1"

Like some of the others in this thread nothing kills a games atmosphere for me quicker then having a miniatures reliant game and not having the correct minis. I play the WotC Star Wars Saga game, and to run the first two adventures in Age of Defiance there is a call for a Rancor encounter. I refuse to substitute something for the rancor, as I believe that piece is essential Star Wars and should be readily available for gamers. A look at e-bay will show you that the cheapest rancor I can find is going to run me in excess of 30.00. That is crazy, for a small piece of plastic!!!!

I don't care if you recycle the old minis, heck make the base a different color from the "limited edition collectors set" and call them the role playing set, but dam do something. I understand marketing and all, but making the role playing game minis reliant and not giving the role players a cost effective way of acquiring them, even going as far as short packing some (like the rancor), is bordering robbery.

Hypothetically speaking say I needed 15 orcs for an encounter, and I went and bought an entire box of mini boosters. Some 175.00 spent! Now I open them and I can't even guarantee I will get an orc at all (likely hood of getting a few orcs is more likely, but not guaranteed) much less the 15 I needed. Mind you the role players just shelled out over 100.00 for the core books which say get minis to play (Our rules are written in them). Who is this marketing to; Hollywood actors? You're shooting yourself in the foot!

There are many alternatives to this, one mentioned above, or in sticking with the different color base theme you could come out with a role playing set which includes each mini (six months after the initial release). That way the initial collectors set has run its course (it really isn't going to make significant money after that) and you can cater to the other 50% of your player base who don't play the minis games, and don't want to go broke trying to get a mini that represents their character or works as a monster for a published adventure. Make them subscriber based, charge for them, send them in brown boxes with pink bases, I really don't care, but give the roll-players some respect at least, and allow them to get the pieces they need for their games without having to live in a cardboard box to do it.

Another example and a real life one: a dude I used to play with has a warforged PC, and he wanted to get a mini for it. Well he spent over 100.00 in booster packs and never even got the "common" warforged he needed. Mind you this is a 1.5 inch piece of plastic that this cat just shelled out 100.00 for. I understand that he could have just gone to a third party site and bought one (at the marked up vender's price of course), but he shouldn't have to! WotC should be marketing to their own masses, reasonably! He actually used the issue as an excuse to prove to himself that D&D is not the game for him, anymore, and left for another group playing a different game, saying he would be back for 4E if the mini things were addressed, so far as I know they haven't been. I am sure that was never the intent of WotC to alienate their role-players, but it is a casualty none the less, and for a game system that is trying to expand it's base it was a step in the wrong direction.

All said I am not mad at WotC, I like their products etc... but there are smarter ways to do this without outsourcing your profits.
They sure made a lot of money off of your friend. I am personally a decent artist, so I just make minis. Clay works, wax works, and you can whittle wooden minis. Although if you have a moto-dremel tool, you don't have too, just use it. I probably primarily use clay.

Also, depending on how 3-D printer technology shapes up, it might offer another method. Minis could be sold for very little, since its just a 3-D design.
I created a similar thread to this, didn't see this one, sorry. My thread also asks about Dungeon Tiles, which I haven't seen much talk about.

As for the minis (so I stay on topic) speaking as someone who is coming "late to the show", I'd love a set of "orcs, gobbos, hobgobs, skeletons, ect.", even if they are all ones you have already released before. I don't know if I'm in the minority or not, so I can't say how well it would sell on the market, but speaking for myself, I'd buy something like that in a heartbeat. I don't know if DDM has a problem with this sort of reprinting the way M:tG does, where the secondary market gets really unhappy when there are reprints. I'd really like to be able to get my hands on the essential minis to start my collection for running the game.

I think this is the biggest hurdle that DDM has, because it is trying to cater to the RPG crowd as well as being a stand-alone miniatures game. As a stand-alone game, random mini's in boosters seems kinda cool, but from an RPG aspect, I just want my orcs/goblins/skeletons. Then I'll pick up some of the cool other minis.
A look at e-bay will show you that the cheapest rancor I can find is going to run me in excess of 30.00. That is crazy, for a small piece of plastic!!!!

I thought rancors were sort of huge, actually.

Hypothetically speaking say I needed 15 orcs for an encounter, and I went and bought an entire box of mini boosters. Some 175.00 spent! Now I open them and I can't even guarantee I will get an orc at all (likely hood of getting a few orcs is more likely, but not guaranteed) much less the 15 I needed.

If you bought a box of 12 boosters, you are *guaranteed* 4 orcs (assuming they're a common in that set), unless your store is opening booster boxes and repacking them. The question is, why are you purchasing a booster case instead of singles if all you need is 15 orcs (now if you need most of the stuff in that set, sure, go ahead and buy booster boxes). They should cost you less than 8$ as singles. As compared to the equivalent in, say, Games Workshop's range of orc minis, which would cost you 20$.

Another example and a real life one: a dude I used to play with has a warforged PC, and he wanted to get a mini for it. Well he spent over 100.00 in booster packs and never even got the "common" warforged he needed.

I don't know of any warforged that's a common. From what I see they're all uncommons. And they sell for less than a buck on eBay. I don't understand why we should care that your friend has more money than sense.

Let's face the facts. If WotC was selling them in blister packs, that warforge would be 2 dollars, minimum, as an unpainted plastic. I remember the old days of purchasing minis. That was the going rate, minus probable inflation since then.

Blind booster distributions means cheaper minis for all of us, because tournament players are subsidizing our purchases by chasing a few rares, leading to lots of packs being opened and minis that are unwanted in tournaments becoming dirt cheap due to high supply and low (tournament) demand. And it means a wider range of minis because WotC can subsidize risk on each individual miniature design by distributing it over an entire set instead of a single miniature (every set will have bombs and duds, the bombs end up paying for the duds).

Low price, a wide range of minis, non-random packaging. Pick two.
I thought rancors were sort of huge, actually.



If you bought a box of 12 boosters, you are *guaranteed* 4 orcs (assuming they're a common in that set), unless your store is opening booster boxes and repacking them. The question is, why are you purchasing a booster case instead of singles if all you need is 15 orcs (now if you need most of the stuff in that set, sure, go ahead and buy booster boxes). They should cost you less than 8$ as singles. As compared to the equivalent in, say, Games Workshop's range of orc minis, which would cost you 20$.



I don't know of any warforged that's a common. From what I see they're all uncommons. And they sell for less than a buck on eBay. I don't understand why we should care that your friend has more money than sense.

Let's face the facts. If WotC was selling them in blister packs, that warforge would be 2 dollars, minimum, as an unpainted plastic. I remember the old days of purchasing minis. That was the going rate, minus probable inflation since then.

Blind booster distributions means cheaper minis for all of us, because tournament players are subsidizing our purchases by chasing a few rares, leading to lots of packs being opened and minis that are unwanted in tournaments becoming dirt cheap due to high supply and low (tournament) demand. And it means a wider range of minis because WotC can subsidize risk on each individual miniature design by distributing it over an entire set instead of a single miniature (every set will have bombs and duds, the bombs end up paying for the duds).

Low price, a wide range of minis, non-random packaging. Pick two.

I hadn't considered the upside to the random packaging being that we can cash in on people opening boosters chasing rares and us picking up the commons super cheap. That is very true. I still would love to see a "kit" for DMs that just has a bunch of the commons all lump together in groups. A skeleton box that just has like 10-20 skeletons, and an orc one that just has a bunch of orcs, ect. I don't know if that is something I can reasonably expect, but it would be nice. As it stands, I'll just have to order them as singles online. One of the problems I've noticed with this is that there are alot of other DMs who have done the same thing, and most of the commons that are just crunch minis (generic skeleton, generic orc, ect.) are sold out.
I hadn't considered the upside to the random packaging being that we can cash in on people opening boosters chasing rares and us picking up the commons super cheap. That is very true. I still would love to see a "kit" for DMs that just has a bunch of the commons all lump together in groups. A skeleton box that just has like 10-20 skeletons, and an orc one that just has a bunch of orcs, ect. I don't know if that is something I can reasonably expect, but it would be nice. As it stands, I'll just have to order them as singles online. One of the problems I've noticed with this is that there are alot of other DMs who have done the same thing, and most of the commons that are just crunch minis (generic skeleton, generic orc, ect.) are sold out.

Well the thing is, the old minis aren't in print anymore, so these ones are going to be harder to come by. But there's new orcs in almost every set, same with gnolls, goblins, etc... To be fair, the orc in Dungeon of Dread is quite ugly, so I guess that's a minus. Desert of Desolation had a decent skeleton mini though, so this one should be available right now (it's a 'boneshard skeleton', not a generic, but really who cares?)

From Desert of Desolation onwards it seems they're reprinting a bunch of stuff: new drider, new beholder (Eye of Flame, actually, but it does the job as a beholder stand-in), remake of green and red dragons, new troll, new ogre mage (oni), new wyvern, new gargoyle... In fact that's a major complaint from the Skirmish players. Personally I'm happy because that's less old stuff I have to hunt down (I started getting minis the week after I came back from GenCon because I assumed I was going to start playing DnD again this year, and I wanted to try out playing with minis ).
I still would love to see a "kit" for DMs that just has a bunch of the commons all lump together...

Kinda like this?

http://www.ccgarmory.com/duofdrcofise.html
Kinda like this?

http://www.ccgarmory.com/duofdrcofise.html

I guess I'll need to go through all the commons and see what I think, but yes this is certainly helpful! Thanks!

I guess I just meant a box set with like 10 each skeleton/orc/goblin/ect. But, this is the first site I've seen that offers full sets of commons from a set. I'll look at the commons and see what I think, thanks!
Mike,

I really would like to see packs of at least 10 of one kind of monster such as goblins and orcs and other monsters that travel in groups. I would go out and buy those first before any random pack. Instead of just a pack of orcs you could have an assortment of Orcs goblins and hobgoblins for instance. I don't know a gamer yet that would really likes the whole random over choice thing.

Don't get me wrong I still love the whole random pack thing but you need to sell it both ways!

Another really needed mini set is commoners and nobles better know as everyday people. Men women and children of the world. I really hate that when I have my buildings all set up that I can't populate my worlds with everyday people. More 3d cardboard buildings! My group will buy everyone that you come out with.

On Dungeon Tiles you need to come out with city and village sets. Cities with cobblestone streets and many buildings with their interiors. A city set could have more that one pack.

Another needed dungeon tile set would be a huge inn/manor with multiple stories.

You don't have to have minis and sets to play but it really makes it deeper if you can see where everyone is at.

If you people out there agree with me then let WotC know!
On Dungeon Tiles you need to come out with city and village sets.

According to Amazon we'll have a city set of dungeon tiles in late October. Longer than I want to wait, but at least it's in the queue.
Large numbers of a single mini may be less nessisary than in 3E.

3E CR system forced you to put large numbers of one kinda kritter together.

The 4E mix and match XP system won't require that. I'm going to be content I think buying singles of commons and uncommons. But if I'm caught without a plan, I could see buying a random booster whipping out the dungeon tiles and winging a decent respectable adventure. (And if the rare is not a gelatanous cube or a dragon, then I'd sell it for more kobolds.)
Sign In to post comments