Dragonlance: Dragonborn - Hatchlings of Teyr

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Here is my take on how Dragonborn can be seamlessly integrated into Dragonlance without breaking the verisimilitude of the world.

Dragonborn:
When Dracart, Wyrllish and Harkiel created the Draconians, no thought was given to the long-term ramifications of their experiments. Given the fact that they were created to serve the role of expendable shock troops, and were never intended to reproduce, such short-sightedness is unsurprising to say the least.

In discovering the female eggs which allowed their race to reproduce, previously recessive traits have begun manifesting themselves in their offspring.

When these recessive traits manifest in an individual, they come to be known as Dragonborn. As Wingless Draconians, Dragonborn typically have the same colouration and features of their Draconian parents, however in place of the more common (and spectacular) Death Throws, these Draconians manifest the recessive breath weapons of their draconic forefathers.

While it is uncommon, it is not unheard of for some Dragonborn (especially Sivak Dragonborn) to grow wings later in life, as previously dormant genes become active [see Scion of Arkhosia PP].

Some Draconians hail Dragonborn as the evolution of their species. Others see them as throwbacks to the mighty wyrms to which the Draconians are decended, others envy them for their similarity to true dragons, while others see them no differently than they do other Draconian species.

Regardless of how any specific Draconian feels about Dragonborn, Dragonborn are afforded equal status in Draconian society, and experience little to no prejudice as a result. As a race with few females, Draconians cannot afford to be picky with their offspring.
Another way to go would be for the Dragonborn to be born among the first generation of Draconian children, an unforseen development for the race. Most children hatched in the Draconian nation of Tyr would be of their parents' subrace of Draconian, but on rare occasions a Dragonborn would be hatched instead. This would make Dragonborn very rare, but not unheard of. They might even be seen as something of a blessing, once their ability to use dragonic breath weapons became known. To people outside of Tyr, especially non-Draconians, the Dragonborn would simply be viewed as wingless Draconians with some unique abilities.
I like this a lot. Thank you for sharing it.
I love Dragonlance and 4ed, so I like very much what you wrote. Thanks for the idea!
I'm not sure I buy that, Draconians were designed by magic corrupting the Metalic dragons eggs. I could see another Wizards trying to find a cure for the Draconians creating some form of dragonborn but not some out of genetic evolution. In fact I think dragonborn should be left out entirely, after all you don't see Bozak or Kender hanging around in Faerun and let's keep out Eldarin and Tieflings as well.
Eladrin are (for want of better words) Silvanesti Elves, since the dev's have clearly stated that they are the 4E equivalent of "high" elves. They might even work for Qualinesti elves with a few tweaks, while the "Elf" race could work well for Kagonesti and/or Qualinesti.

As far as Kender are concerned, the line between Halflings and Kender are blurring with each successive edition. All it would take to transform a 4E Halfling into a Kender would be the following:

Weapon Proficiency: Kender are proficient in 2 racial weapons.
Skills: +2 Stealth, +2 Thievery
Racial Power: Replace Second Chance with Insulting Taunt.

Insulting Taunt**
Encounter * Charm
Standard Action * Close Burst 5
Target: 1 creature
Attack: Charisma +2 vs. Will
Increase bonus to +4 at 11th level, and +6 at 21st level.
Hit: You pull the target 3 squares, and you mark the target (save ends).
Miss: You mark the target (save ends).
Effect: At the start of your turn, you can pull the marked target 1 square as a minor action.

** This power is my interpretation of the power designed by Cam Banks.

I admit, the presence of Tieflings, are difficult to justify.

All other races can be reskinned and/or tweaked to fit Dragonlance very easily:

Half-Ogre: Reskinned Goliath
Tarmak Brute: Reskinned Half-Orc
Irda: Reskinned Deva; Replace racial power with an At-Will Change Shape power.
Barbarian Humans: Reskinned Shifters

Sure, alternative racial PPs would need to be created for some of the races, but overall, it works with very few adjustments.
The Halfling racial PP in PHB2 actually has a taunt power.
lol there you go (pays for me to actually look at the PPs before typing lol). This only reinforces the point that in distancing themselves from Hobbits, Halflings are becoming more like Kender with each subsequent edition (although this is slightly off-topic).

ODnD: Hobbits (there were no Halflings).
Basic Dnd: Halfing = Hobbit with a name change.
Adnd 1E: Halfling = Hobbit. Hairfoot (Harfoot), Tallfellow (Fallohide) and Stout (Stoor) Hobbits were included. (1)
Adnd 2E: Halflings = Stout Halflings, although they are no longer identified as such. (2)
DnD 3.X: Halflings = Lightfoot Halflings (a Kender/Halfling Cross-breed). (3)
DnD 4E: Halflings = Riverboat Kender.

Thats how I see it anyway.

(1) At this time period, the only non-tolkien sub-race was Kender (1982: DL 1-15 & 1987: DL Adventures).
(2) AFAIK Strongheart & Ghostwise Halflings make their appearance in the FRCS (1990).
(3) Talentia Halflings make their appearance in the EBCS (2004)
Eladrin are (for want of better words) Silvanesti Elves, since the dev's have clearly stated that they are the 4E equivalent of "high" elves. They might even work for Qualinesti elves with a few tweaks, while the "Elf" race could work well for Kagonesti and/or Qualinesti.

Eladrin first appeared in a D&D product in Planescape Monstrous Compendium Appendix II (1995). This book featured the bralani, the coure, the firre, the ghaele, the noviere, the shiere, and the tulani.

Eladrin

Dungeons & Dragons creature

Alignment Chaotic Good

Type Outsider

Source books 3.5E Monster Manual 1, 3E Monster Manual 1, Planescape Appendix 2, Book of Exalted Deeds

First appearance In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, eladrins are a type of celestial of chaotic good alignment and hail from the plane of Arborea.

Eladrins are all extraplanar outsiders [/b]that share a number of magical powers: They possess Darkvision, the ability to see in the dark. They are immune to electricity and petrification. They are resistant to cold and fire. They can speak with any creature that has a language.

Types of Eladrins Coure - Spritelike eladrins that serve more powerful beings as messengers and scouts. Bralani - Wild and feral eladrins that can assume the shape of a whirlwind or zephyr of dust, snow, or sand. Firre - Red-haired elven eladrins that protect works of art and the artists who create them. Ghaele - Knights-errant of the celestials who quietly muster resistance and offer guidance to any of good heart. Noviere - an aquatic eladrin that dwells on Ossa, the second layer of Arborea. Shiere - serve and protect Arborea as the noble knights of the eladrin. Shiradi - Shiradis battle for freedom across the planes, helping the oppressed, deceived, and less fortunate. Tulani - The ancient faerie lords of the eladrin, who roam seeking peace, beauty, and solitude.

The Court of Stars The celestial paragons of the eladrins are collectively known as The Court of Stars. The members include: Faerinaal, the Queen's Consort - Oversees the defense of the Court of Stars and liberates eladrins captured by evil forces. Gwynharwyf, the Whirling Fury - Queen Morwel's loyal champion and a barbarian of unparalleled ferocity. Morwel, Queen of Stars - The ruler of the eladrins and the Court of Stars. Former Members: Ascodel - This former Royal Consort was tricked into a pact with the demoness Pale Night, condemning a generation of young eladrins to be eternally bound to the Abyssal layer of Androlynne. Ascodel died fighting to defend these children on Androlynne. Vaeros - The predecessor of Faerinaal perished during a mission to the Abyss to liberate eladrins captured by the forces of evil.

Dragonlance Elves
The elves were one of the three original races, created by Paladine, god of light. They were given a great span of life, wisdom and beauty. They were known as the Colinesti. However, as time passed their conditions turned them into:


Silvanesti elves
In the beginning of time the original elves, fearing the mountains where the evil ogres lived and the plains where the short tempered humans were settling, decided to adopt the woods as home. After battling the evil dragons with the help of the gods of magic, the realm of Silvanesti was founded and named for Silvanos, the first leader of the elves.

As time developed, the Silvanesti elves became more secluded, stopping contact with the other races. Their society divided into different castes, creating a social discrimination that ultimately led to the division of their realm into the Silvanesti and the Qualinesti elves.

In ancient age, the Silvanesti elves were known to have telepathic powers, reserved for the royal household to communicate with subordinates through Silvanesti. After the Cataclysm its use diminished. By the time the War of the Lance began, the use was restricted to the royal household itself, and disappeared soon after the war.

The main building is the Tower of the Stars where the king of the Silvanesti, known as the Speaker of the Stars, lives. It is settled in Silvanost, the capital of Silvanesti.

The Silvanesti elves believe themselves the Firstborn of the gods. Using their magical powers, they twist the trees in the region to shape them into structures of marble and silver, and do not have contact with other races, except for their servants, the Kagonesti.

The authors have defined that, due their extended time apart, the Qualinesti and Silvanesti elves developed different accents. Also, as a trait, the Silvanesti elves have finer features.

So again like the dragonborn, the eladrin have no place in Dragonlance. The books were developed from a first edition module just as the character were like wise developed through role-playing. If you want to have all of these new races your going to have to scrap the original premise and start over again to get what you are looking for from DnD 4.0.
Preparatory to creating the Dragonlance setting, Tracy Hickman ran a series of Dungeons & Dragons adventures. Harold Johnson, one of those involved in these games, chose to play a halfing thief character whom he called Almar Tann. When Hickman, Johnson and others moved to the Dragonlance setting for their games, the character of Almar Tann went with them. However, it became clear to those involved that halflings were unsuitable to the Dragonlance world; as Johnson described it, this was especially due to his characters' possession of a ring of invisibility, so that "it all sounded too much like another story" (referring to Bilbo Baggins and the One Ring). Halflings were thus dropped from the campaign, and Johnson developed both the initial concept of the kender and the first representative of the fantasy race, Tasslehoff Burrfoot. To solidify the distinction, they were originally described as "thinner, more wiry, and more cunning and streetwise" than halflings.

Roger E. Moore introduced the kender (and Tasslehoff Burrfoot) to the wider community through his short story A Stone's Throw Away, published in 1984 in Dragon #85. While Tracy Hickman was involved in some of the development, he has stated that it is Roger Moore who did the most to define kender as they are depicted today.

The original concept of kender was that they were "savage, warrior children, ever curious, ever alert". This concept was altered dramatically when Janet Pack became involved in dramatic readings of the works, as Pack's personal characteristics had a strong impact on how those involved in the process viewed the kender. According to Jeff Grubb, she, "and as a result all kender since her, was cute. Extremely cute. Sweetly, lovably, frustratingly cute.... And it's hard, after seeing Janet play Tas, to imagine them any other way." Two of the other key characteristics of Kender—their curiosity and kleptomania—were introduced by Tracy Hickman. Hickman was uncomfortable with the notion of a "race of thieves" in his games, but still wanted the skills typically associated with thieves, so he added their "innocent tendency to 'borrow' things for indeterminate periods of time."

Originally, kender were to be called "kinder", in reference to "kinderkin", but Hickman has reported that readers tended to read the name as "kind-er" rather than "kin-der" in print, leading to the decision to alter the spelling.
** This power is my interpretation of the power designed by Cam Banks.

I admit, the presence of Tieflings, are difficult to justify.

All other races can be reskinned and/or tweaked to fit Dragonlance very easily:

Half-Ogre: Reskinned Goliath
Tarmak Brute: Reskinned Half-Orc
Irda: Reskinned Deva; Replace racial power with an At-Will Change Shape power.
Barbarian Humans: Reskinned Shifters

Sure, alternative racial PPs would need to be created for some of the races, but overall, it works with very few adjustments.

I also do not like the idea of tweaked to fit , and I agree if you are going to make a Hasbro D&D Dragonlance, just make another world instead, maybe an alternate universe created from all the time travelling spells that were used. The Spellplague in Forgotten Realms was bad enough let's hope they do not make the same mistale in DL.
I don't think the world needs to change to support 4E. At least not the races. It simply needs stated in the setting book that certain races don't exist. I really would like to see that but given WoTC tendency to make everthing usable in every setting I doubt it will happen.


To me its the differences in the settings that make them unique. Why bother with all these different settings if its simply take all the stuff published and use different location names.
I'd think that if there is any chance of there being a 4e version of Dragonlance officially produced by Wizards, we're in for another Cataclysm. The old material, as has been discussed, doesn't shoehorn very well into the new edition.

I think the Draconian idea presented by the OP works well to introduce Dragonborn to Krynn. (The first thing I thought of when I first heard about Dragonborn in 4e was Draconians.) I believe I've seen that Tieflings already existed on Krynn in previous editions, so that's taken care of too.

Actually, thinking about it now, maybe there isn't a lot of shoehorning needed to make DL fit the new edition. Even the new magic system can work with DL, given the upheaval that's occurred between the cousins and the WoHS.
Long Live the Lance! Give us 4e DL!
well if the tiefling did not exist in Krynn, they certainly could of planar traveled there from other worlds......
a mask everyone has at least two of, one they wear in public and another they wear in private.....
well if the tiefling did not exist in Krynn, they certainly could of planar traveled there from other worlds......

Personally I'm a big fan of the Githyanki, let's planar travel them in there too. And speaking of other beings why not Spelljammer in a couple of Drow, better yet Drizzt Do'Urden himself. I'm sure he's getting bored in Toril. The question becomes once you begin where do you stop?
I'm of the mind set that I like incorporating the new features of 4E into different Campaign settings, but I really, REALLY don't think Wizards should do this with DL. If they did, it would just be another Toril.

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/19.jpg)

Personally I'm a big fan of the Githyanki, let's planar travel them in there too. And speaking of other beings why not Spelljammer in a couple of Drow, better yet Drizzt Do'Urden himself. I'm sure he's getting bored in Toril. The question becomes once you begin where do you stop?

thats actually quite simple.
dont bring or use named characters from other worlds.....
a mask everyone has at least two of, one they wear in public and another they wear in private.....
For those who are interested:
Travellers from the Beyond
.....Those who come to Krynn from other worlds may find more than they bargained for. The gods of Krynn have secured their world against such incursions for fear of upsetting the balance of the world. There is a 1% per day cumulative chance that a character visiting Krynn from other worlds cannot return across the void to his home world. This percentage is checked any time any atempt is made. Those failing this check remain on Krynn. This percentage never gets any higher than 98%......

There has always been some degree of interworld travel between Krynn and other worlds, although not to the degree that is experienced in Abeir-Toril, Eberron, or other CS.
times change, things change. and ways to bend them always exist.


best way to do it, make sure your NOT on their world when planar travel is used.....

or
rule 0
a mask everyone has at least two of, one they wear in public and another they wear in private.....
I really like the OP's idea. At least for a campaign set after the War of Souls, it makes for a reasonable explanation for the presence of dragonborn on Krynn. One could even decide that all draconian eggs hatch into dragonborn, since they're not created by magic like the first generation.

But to make things even simpler, in my camaign, I think i might just take the stats for Dragonborn and call then Baaz Draconian. Baaz are medium sizes, strong and though , likely to fight harder when wounded. I'd just need to mention that they turn into stone upon death, and perhaps change that +2 to History checks to something else and be done with it. I'm not sure what to do with the breath weapon, but I'm tempted to leave it as is, perhaps making it automatically fire for Baaz since they come from brass dragon eggs. As for other draconian types, I plan to have them in my game, too, just not as a playable race.
thats actually quite simple.
dont bring or use named characters from other worlds.....

Or even better don't disprupt what's already been established that makes those worlds great. Just a thought.
For those who are interested:

There has always been some degree of interworld travel between Krynn and other worlds, although not to the degree that is experienced in Abeir-Toril, Eberron, or other CS.

Excerpt, Dragonlance Adventures Campaign Setting
If I were gaming and I wanted to bring say a Solomnic Knight to Oerth or Vice versa a Half-Orc fighter to Krynn I could under certain guidelines that adhere to that world;which is what that rule applies too. In a general campaign setting based upon the books that would not be the norm. It was put in so that if you as a PC or DM wanted to bring in a character or creature from another world they could for your adventure. What you are saying is that all of these new creatures should be the norm (Dragonborn, Eladrin, Teifling) and that is not the case.
I'm of the mind set that I like incorporating the new features of 4E into different Campaign settings, but I really, REALLY don't think Wizards should do this with DL. If they did, it would just be another Toril.

That's about right.
I think the often noble character of dragonborn is actually a good fit with the Dragonlance setting, but yeah it's tricky. I like the descendants-of-draconians idea, it fits with the history of Krynn and brings in some interesting character possibilities.

I recently had to deal with the problem of including dragonborn in Dragonlance when I started a campaign with one PC dragonborn before I realized I wanted to set it in Krynn. Here's what I came up with: In the ancient past, when the dragons were at war with each other, some of the chromatic dragons were ashamed by the evil tendencies of their kind. They humbly approached the good dragons and offered to betray their own kind to end the war. The metalics were impressed by their courage, but not by their offer of treachery. And not everyone was convinced that their offer was real. Seeing the good intent in their hearts and the real danger that they would still be rebuffed by the metalics, Paladine transformed them into lesser beings as a kind of test. The good dragons were amazed as the humanoid dragons, greatly reduced in power, nevertheless performed feats of incredible courage in the service of honor and good. Their partnership lasted throughout that age, and then the dragonborn multiplied and became like the other humanoid races in their diversity of good, neutrality and evil.

What I still haven't figured out is where a good homeland(s) for dragonborn would be. Or maybe they do the tiny-enclave-among-other-races thing.