What are magic items going to do in your campaign?

I ask this to garner ideas if not outright steal them. Thanks ahead of time to any ideas I pilfer.

 

I am happy that +X is not necessary and I plan on not having them in my campaign hopefully freeing me to give items more interesting abilities thus making the more memorable and fun without having to worry about ever escalating numbers.

 

What will you be doing with items in your game? What item ideas do you have? Also how do you think that differant styles of items will affect campaigns differently? 

Lady_Auralla wrote:

 

I am happy that +X is not necessary and I plan on not having them in my campaign hopefully freeing me to give items more interesting abilities thus making the more memorable and fun without having to worry about ever escalating numbers.

 

 

Me too.

Turn the PCs into walking demigods who obliterate all they encounter.

Lady_Auralla wrote:

What will you be doing with items in your game? What item ideas do you have? Also how do you think that differant styles of items will affect campaigns differently? 

 

In my games, I usually prefer for magic items to have abilities that can be activated by the wielder, and those abilities should be related to history of the item.

 

 

There are a great many problems that can be circumvented by players and DMs having a mature discussion about what the game is going to be like before they ever sit down together to play.

 

The answer really does lie in more options, not in confining and segregating certain options.

 

You really shouldn't speak for others.  You can't hear what someone else is saying when you try to put your words in their mouth.

 

Fencing & Swashbuckling as Armor.

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Save the breasts.

I've used this idea since 3e. it's something I call 'Ancestral weapons' (stolen from the D&D Heroes X-Box ARPG) It's pretty simple: Players can start with a weapon, that levels up with them, gaining magical properties as the player advances. They might just become +1, or have a simple power (like being able to glow as if 'light' was cast on them 3 times a day) around level 3, and just get more and more awesome from there.

 

I also like interesting utility items, like a collapsable pole. It just a wooden rod that, with a quick command word, goes from 1' to 10'. It's not powerful enough to do damage or smash open doors on expansion, or anything. Just a useful and portable tool, that's no stronger than non-magical hardwood.

 

I like 'set' magic items too, also stolen from a video game (Diablo 2).

 

I also like using special materials that convey small, non-magical bonuses to weapons, armor, implements, etc. Something like a serrated longsword. +1 to damage, but no +1 to hit. These things are basically 'masterwork' items, so they cost more, and might only be available in certain cities/kingdoms. I like using mithral and adamantine as just materials, ie: they don't have to be only used for magical items. On the other side of that, I also like inferior materials, like bronze, copper, etc. that apply -1's and might add weight, or be more fragile. For 4e Dark Sun, I had obsidian blades break on a natural 1, cause bleeding damage (1 pt/round per tier. save ends.) and have the high crit property.), for example.

 

I don't want to be an edition warrior. I think there was something good and something bad in all the editions I played. I do, however, believe that the game has gotten better over the years (and decades). I hope this holds true into the future.

Peace.

 

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/21.jpg)

I'm figuring magic weapons will be the only way certain foes can be damaged. Dragons, liches, and the like. 

 

Particularly named monsters. Like an Orc-chieftain that's been blessed by shamans. 

 

Magic armor may have no weight or protect against non-magical weapons. I don't know. I'm really thinking of amping up the effects. 

Idea: Sword of Heroism: The bearer gains advantage against fear effects and on successful attack against creatures with fear abilities rolls the damage dice of this weapon twice and uses the higher one.

Items which are certain to be included in my campaign because they have historical significance within my campaign setting (because my players used them in prior campaigns)

 

1) A clear crystal orb with an attached metal stand (it looks just like a "crystal ball" paper weight in the real world, made with clear glass) that can be used to entrap up to 13 outsiders indefinitely, and release them at a later time if desired. It also happens to be entirely immune to damage from heat or flame (and most other attack forms that demons or devils would use to try and destroy it) - so eventually it is going to find its way out of the volcano it got thrown into and likely will be found by some idiot that thinks letting the 13 demons inside out will somehow benefit him.

 

2) An ancient sword of exquisite craftmanship, but plain design, perfectly sized for someone 5' 8" and basically human in proportion. It fully affects incorporeal and undead creatures of all types, grants the wielder proficiency (if it likes them) and is intelligent but refuses to communicate in any way other than encouraging supreme confidence in its wielder, and has yet to reveal any other powers it might possess to anyone (it has trust issues because of its history).

 

3) A staff carefully carved from a limb of the last specimen of a particular type of tree, crafted along with numerous other wooden items when that tee was uprooted and used for parts by a wood-worker that did not then realize his actions were making the tree extinct. It produces light, aids in detect of intentionally hidden objects (including secret doors), and pierces a certain amount of magical resistance when wielded against a chaotic creature by a non-chaotic wizard.

 

4) "the ring of dark vision" - so named because, while it does allow for exceptional vision despite a lack of light, the primary effect of the item is to cause sporadic visions of dark things, such as a shadow reaching out to strangle the wearer, or the sight of children playing to be seen instead as those children gleefully slaughtering a domestic animal with their bare hands and a sharpened stick.

 

5) The Wizard's Rainbow (13 glass spheres of different colors with various supernatural powers), borrowed and modified from the fiction works of Stephen King - though the pink one is the only which has made an appearance as of yet.

ATTENTION:  If while reading my post you find yourself thinking "Either this guy is being sarcastic, or he is an idiot," do please assume that I am an idiot. It makes reading your replies more entertaining. If, however, you find yourself hoping that I am not being even remotely serious then you are very likely correct as I find irreverence and being ridiculous to be relaxing.

Brute's Force: war maul that can a) do +1d6 force dmg on hit or b) on hit, the 1d6 is stored up to 4 times but must be released on the 5th hit or the dmg comes back at the wielder.

 

EDIT: As to whether there might be a save on the damage coming back, I'm gonna say no save, because the character knows the limits, forgot and exceeded them. Sounds like they already failed the INT save when trying to store the fifth charge!

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AaronOfBarbaria wrote:

Items which are certain to be included in my campaign because they have historical significance within my campaign setting (because my players used them in prior campaigns)

 

1) A clear crystal orb with an attached metal stand (it looks just like a "crystal ball" paper weight in the real world, made with clear glass) that can be used to entrap up to 13 outsiders indefinitely, and release them at a later time if desired. It also happens to be entirely immune to damage from heat or flame (and most other attack forms that demons or devils would use to try and destroy it) - so eventually it is going to find its way out of the volcano it got thrown into and likely will be found by some idiot that thinks letting the 13 demons inside out will somehow benefit him.

 

 

I love the idea behind this item. It reminds me, and please don't be offended, of the Chest of Demons from Scooby Doo and the 13 Ghosts, which I used to watch when I was a kid. Seriously though, the fun that could be had with such an item in a campaign. lol

Disclaimer: Wizards of the Coast is not responsible for the consequences of splitting up the party, sticking appendages in the mouth of a leering green devil face, accepting a dinner invitation from bugbears, storming the feast hall of a hill giant steading, angering a dragon of any variety, or saying yes when the DM asks, "Are you really sure?"

 

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Luciender wrote:

 

AaronOfBarbaria wrote:

Items which are certain to be included in my campaign because they have historical significance within my campaign setting (because my players used them in prior campaigns)

 

1) A clear crystal orb with an attached metal stand (it looks just like a "crystal ball" paper weight in the real world, made with clear glass) that can be used to entrap up to 13 outsiders indefinitely, and release them at a later time if desired. It also happens to be entirely immune to damage from heat or flame (and most other attack forms that demons or devils would use to try and destroy it) - so eventually it is going to find its way out of the volcano it got thrown into and likely will be found by some idiot that thinks letting the 13 demons inside out will somehow benefit him.

 

 

 

I love the idea behind this item. It reminds me, and please don't be offended, of the Chest of Demons from Scooby Doo and the 13 Ghosts, which I used to watch when I was a kid. Seriously though, the fun that could be had with such an item in a campaign. lol

I am not at all afraid to admit to stealing ideas from wherever I might encounter them. That Scooby Doo story may in fact be where the idea took root in my brain. That it appears as a paperweight (in a setting where such a thing is not as much a commonality as it is in our world) is even an idea stolen from elsewhere (specifically, Stephen King and his stealing of ideas that results in some characters in one of his books having a wild-west style gun fight with light saber and golden snitch (with razor-bladed wings) wielding Doombots - and the idea enforced by that scene that all worlds are connected).

 

The item doesn't just look like a paperweight - it is a paperweight. It just wandered to the wrong world (or a wizard did the wandering) and ended up being the best suited thing for a particular bit of artifice that the wizard had on hand (it being a hollow space from another world fits the theme of it being used to contain things from another world).

ATTENTION:  If while reading my post you find yourself thinking "Either this guy is being sarcastic, or he is an idiot," do please assume that I am an idiot. It makes reading your replies more entertaining. If, however, you find yourself hoping that I am not being even remotely serious then you are very likely correct as I find irreverence and being ridiculous to be relaxing.

So far all my magic items have had a minor beneficial effect, and a minor negative effect.

For each of the three PCs in my current game, I have a "signature item" created for them. At some point along the way they will earn/win/find it. They are mostly variants of iconic items (but with tweaks for coolness or uniqueness). As I'm keeping the current setting low-magic, other than the occasional minor or expendable item, these are it for them. (I am mindful of the fact some of this will need adjusting once the real rules come out. I wrote these several packets ago.)

 

 

The female Elf Wizard: Staff of Arcane Might

This fabled implement of power is forged of pure mithral. It is virtually unbreakable, having not even minor scratches or dents despite its considerable age. The silvery staff stands just over 5 feet in height and is surprisingly light weight. The head of the staff resembles two stylized dragons intertwined. Their maws open to bite down on a shared, flawless sunstone sphere the size of a child’s fist. When grasped by someone capable of unlocking its power, the stone flares briefly with delicate amber light.

Requirement:  You must be able to cast arcane spells.

Property:  While wielding the staff of arcane might, you gain the following benefits:

  • You gain a +2 bonus to your AC, as if benefitting from the use of a shield.
  • You gain a +2 bonus to magic attacks rolls.
  • The saving throw DC to resist your spells increases by 2.

Property (Attuned):  While wielding a staff of arcane might, as a reaction when you are attacked by or targeted by a spell, you can have the staff absorb that spell without harm or effect. The staff cannot absorb or nullify spells that do not target you alone, such as fireball. When the staff nullifies a spell, it captures and stores the spell’s energy, which you can later use to fuel your own spells. You instantly detect a spell’s level as the staff absorbs its energy.

      The amount of energy (or spell points) gained by absorbing a spell is equal to the level of the spell absorbed. For example, a 3rd-level spell affords the staff 3 spell points.

      As the staff accumulates spell points, you can spend the stored energy to cast any spell you know and have prepared. Doing so does not remove the spell from your memory. To do so, you must take an action and expend a number of spell points equal to the level of spell you wish to cast.

      A staff of arcane might can store up to 20 spell points. If you are targeted by a spell whose level would convert to more spell points than the staff can hold, it cannot absorb that spell.

      A staff of arcane might can store up to 20 spell points. If you are targeted by a spell whose level would convert to more spell points than the staff can hold, it cannot absorb that spell.

      A staff of arcane might is usually found with 1d4+2 spell points but never regains charges on its own. When held, the attuned owner always knows how many spell points are currently stored in the staff.

Secret: Should it ever be drained of its last spell point, the staff blackens as the residual magic flees and it loses all its powers permanently.

 

 

The female Human Thief: Cloak of Invisibility

Crafted from the finest silks, cords and fibers from some unknown realm, this soft, exquisite hooded cape weighs only half that of a normal cloak, despite its full length.

Property:  You can attempt to hide at the end of your move without using an action.

Property (Attuned):  While wearing the cloak of invisibility, if you lift the hood over your head, you – along with your clothing, armor, weapons, and other equipment – become invisible. This effect persists until the hood is lowered, or until you attack or cast a spell that affects a creature other than yourself. Once the cloak’s power has been used for a total of 2 hours, its magic ceases to function. For every uninterrupted period of 12 hours that it is not used, the cloak regains 1 hour of functionality.

Secret:  The powerful invisibility effect provided by this cloak creates a unique bond with all other invisible things in the immediate area. While benefiting from the invisibility of this cloak, you can see normally – and be seen by – any other invisible creatures or objects up to 100 ft away and within line of sight.

 

 

The male Dwarf Fighter: Grubthar’s Hammer

This ancient warhammer was crafted by the fabled Dwarven Forge–Master, Grubthar Ironfist, to help aid in quelling the giantkind threat during the Fellstone Wars of more than 400 years ago. This ornate weapon weighs a hefty 15 pounds due to the rare, dense metals and alloys used in its creation.

Property:  You gain a +1 bonus to attack and damage rolls made with this weapon. It can be hurled as a thrown weapon, with a range or 20/80 feet, returning to its owner’s hand.

Property:  The warhammer thrums with a faint vibration whenever it is within 100 feet of a giant, hinting at the weapon’s history, as well as its greater purpose and power.

Requirement:  You must be a dwarf to become attuned to this weapon.

Properties (Attuned):  The bonus to attack and damage rolls increases to +3. In addition, the wielder has access to the following additional properties:

  • Giant Slayer:  This weapon deals 2d6 extra damage to giants. It also scores critical hits against them with a natural d20 roll of 18-20.
  • Thunderburst:  A critical hit from this weapon unleashes a loud thunder clap. Any non-dwarf within 20 feet of the target must make a DC 15 Constitution saving throw. On a failed saving throw the creature is deafened for 1d6x10 minutes. Giants failing their saving throw also suffer 3d6 thunder damage. On a successful saving throw they take only half the damage and are not deafened.
  • Vengeful Smite (3 charges/day): Expend 1 charge to reroll any one damage die resulting from a hit with this weapon. Expend 3 charges to change a normal hit from this weapon into a critical. Each time you suffer a critical hit while wielding this weapon, gain 1 charge (charges in excess of 3 are lost after any rest). 

Legendary Sword of Demon Bane

 

1) The sword glows in cold light whenever a demon is closer than 25 feet.

 

2) No DR of any kind works against this sword and no kind of immunity works against this sword for any type of demon.

 

3) The sword adds an additional damage die if a critical hit is scored against a demon.

 

___________________________________________________________

A little bit of good will is a big step towards making this planet a better place

I relegate +1 weapon, armour and tool items to the realm of Masterwork; non magical, but made with such craftsmanship or special materials that they have a +1 bonus. It gives players something to do with their money in teh first few levels, and seeking out the master bowmaker/toolmaker/Hattori Hanzo steel can make for fun roleplaying.

 

Magic items should have more interesting properties. I also have them scale in effect with the character level, not because they need to to keep up with the arms race, but because I don't want the players ancestral/custom/trademark weapon to have to keep getting traded in because something better comes along.

 

Now, how MUCH they should scale (for my campaign, I make no claim it should be a general rule!) without breaking bounded accuracy is something I don't know yet.

Like everything else in my first 5e campaign, Next World, magic items will be a bit silly and poke fun of gamer culture. Such as:

 

The Meat Sword
Uncommon magic long sword
 
Long and slightly curved like a fillet knife, this +1 aristocratic long sword of ancient Grognard make is so sharp that it cuts straight through abstraction like luck and endurance and deep into meat and bone. When you roll a natural 20 while attacking with this sword, you can choose to spend a Hit Dice to heal your meat. This is definitely magical healing, not any of that immersion-breaking martial healing. The Grognards forbade that sort of theing in Immersion City until, ironically, their city broke and sunk to the bottom of the Bog Standard.
 
(This is an item I put in my first adventure, The Ruins of Old School.)

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I tend towards wonderous items that have interesting affects that a player might have to be a little creative to find a use for.

 

Magic weapons usually come with strings attached, like a PC has to accept a task from a god or other powerful creature and in the process they are given or have their weapon imbues with magic. I'll probably look at 3e/4e weapons and feats for ideas for magic items. There are some cool items that would still be interesting without the +1.

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"It is a general popular error to suppose the loudest complainers for the publick to be the most anxious for its welfare." - Edmund Burke

The most populat magic item in my (now 13th level) 4E campaign is a faulty Bag of Holding. Sometimes items placed into it disappear; legend has it that they reappear through an extradimensional portal in the lair of the avaricious mad wizard who created the item.

 

The players glued it to the underside of an ermine-covered wooden seat with a hole in it and have a hireling carry it everywhere for them as a portable commode.

 

If that wizard wasn't mad BEFORE they got a hold of th item, he certainly is NOW!

 

A magic item doesn't have to be powerful to be memorable.

 

 

I attempt doesn't have to be magic at all to be memorable. I know my favorite item to date is a sock puppet named Miss Lola. Besides being a very strict mistress, she was a excellent gambler.

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Imagine a world where the first-time D&D player rolls stats, picks a race, picks a class, picks an alignment, and buys gear to create a character. Imagine if an experienced player, maybe the person helping our theoretical player learn the ropes, could also make a character by rolling ability scores and picking a race, class, feat, skills, class features, spells or powers, and so on. Those two players used different paths to build characters, but the system design allows them to play at the same table. -Mearl

"It is a general popular error to suppose the loudest complainers for the publick to be the most anxious for its welfare." - Edmund Burke

I'm definitely leaning towards enhancing PC options with magic items.   I'd rather have a weapon or item that grants a limited spell-like effect or maneuver than have +x items.   For me, magic should expand what a PC can do in difficult situations not merely increase their raw power to hit and deal damage.   I like it flavorwise and it fits better with bounded accuracy.

 

I've already found that in my playtest games even giving a +1 to AC with magical armor makes a huge difference for a fighter, so I may be more reluctant to bestow that type of adjustment upon a PC.

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iserith wrote:

Like everything else in my first 5e campaign, Next World, magic items will be a bit silly and poke fun of gamer culture. Such as:

 

The Meat Sword
Uncommon magic long sword
 
Long and slightly curved like a fillet knife, this +1 aristocratic long sword of ancient Grognard make is so sharp that it cuts straight through abstraction like luck and endurance and deep into meat and bone. When you roll a natural 20 while attacking with this sword, you can choose to spend a Hit Dice to heal your meat. This is definitely magical healing, not any of that immersion-breaking martial healing. The Grognards forbade that sort of theing in Immersion City until, ironically, their city broke and sunk to the bottom of the Bog Standard.
 
(This is an item I put in my first adventure, The Ruins of Old School.)

 

I feel like you should wield this with The Meat Shield, which would essentially be a fighter that you strap to your arm to absorb attacks.

DemoMonkey wrote:

The most populat magic item in my (now 13th level) 4E campaign is a faulty Bag of Holding. Sometimes items placed into it disappear; legend has it that they reappear through an extradimensional portal in the lair of the avaricious mad wizard who created the item.

 

The players glued it to the underside of an ermine-covered wooden seat with a hole in it and have a hireling carry it everywhere for them as a portable commode.

 

If that wizard wasn't mad BEFORE they got a hold of th item, he certainly is NOW!

 

A magic item doesn't have to be powerful to be memorable.

 

 

 

... chamber pot of holding, ftw.

GhostStepper wrote:

 

iserith wrote:

Like everything else in my first 5e campaign, Next World, magic items will be a bit silly and poke fun of gamer culture. Such as:

 

The Meat Sword
Uncommon magic long sword
 
Long and slightly curved like a fillet knife, this +1 aristocratic long sword of ancient Grognard make is so sharp that it cuts straight through abstraction like luck and endurance and deep into meat and bone. When you roll a natural 20 while attacking with this sword, you can choose to spend a Hit Dice to heal your meat. This is definitely magical healing, not any of that immersion-breaking martial healing. The Grognards forbade that sort of theing in Immersion City until, ironically, their city broke and sunk to the bottom of the Bog Standard.
 
(This is an item I put in my first adventure, The Ruins of Old School.)

 

 

I feel like you should wield this with The Meat Shield, which would essentially be a fighter that you strap to your arm to absorb attacks.

 

Could it be bacon with fighter levels? That sounds delicious and there is no reason fighters should be able to do anything bacon cannot.

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Imagine a world where the first-time D&D player rolls stats, picks a race, picks a class, picks an alignment, and buys gear to create a character. Imagine if an experienced player, maybe the person helping our theoretical player learn the ropes, could also make a character by rolling ability scores and picking a race, class, feat, skills, class features, spells or powers, and so on. Those two players used different paths to build characters, but the system design allows them to play at the same table. -Mearl

"It is a general popular error to suppose the loudest complainers for the publick to be the most anxious for its welfare." - Edmund Burke

Thank God I'm not in some people's campaign.

 

Anyway.   I will probably have magic items kind of like they were in 2e.  I'll decide what the group gets and it will be reasonable.   My range on pluses will likely be 1 to 3 instead of 1 to 5.

 

 

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My old Wotc blogs have been moved as well.

 

 

sleypy wrote:

Could it be bacon with fighter levels? That sounds delicious and there is no reason fighters should be able to do anything bacon cannot.

Just make sure to factor in the Monster-Drawing Aroma disadvantage!

E. Tallitnics on Google+, Roll20, and Twitter.

I will also use less +'s magic items and more interesting and unique ones. I'll also use more customized items, something i didn't much do with 4E. Here's an exemple of one of the last item i created;

 

Living Armor

Very rare armor (hide armor)
This hide armor is covered of a thick silvery gray fur. When attempting to touch it for the first time, hairs lift on its back. It is warm to the touch and a pulse can be felt. Under its skin, veins can be seen while muscles and bones can be felt when touched carefully. It allow a creature to wear it, fastening itself tight to the wearer provided it pats it and succeed on a moderate Wisdom (Animal Handling) check..

   Property [Attuned]: Due to the heat it generates, the wearer is protected against cold weather, granting advantage on any saving throw against cold-base effects, but is not suited for hot temperature, possibly causing exhaustion for each hour of exposure (moderate Constitution saving throw). The living armor grant its wearrer resistance to damage, effectively taking half of the damage sustained by the wearer. The armor has 30 hit points and bleed once below half its hit points and loose its properties once it reaches 0 hit point. The armor can be healed only through magical means, which restore lost hit points and properties.

 

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Oh gosh there are so many good effects you can add:

  • Blink: When you hit with this weapon you can choose to teleport directly behind your target, in the direction of your attack. 
  • Moved: When you hit with this weapon you can choose to either Push or Pull your target 5'. (Can also be designed to Push on a miss or Pull on a hit.)
  • Hover: When you wield this item you automatically hover 6" off the ground, your speed is 0 and your elevation cannot be changed. 
  • Knowing: When you wear this item you have Proficiency in ______. (Language, Skill, Tool, or Weapon (etc.).)
  • Bump: When you wear/wield this item ______ is increased by _____ points.

The short of this is that a magic item can affect, for better or worse, any mechanic of the game!

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Other than damage I do not think this system handles straight out +X to just about anything to well, but removing these seems to open areas where before were not utilized as freely due the tyranny of bonus stacking and its systemic effects. So in order to save myself and my game the trouble there will be nothing magic item wise to stack.

I also added a little to the attunement rules in my and that is in order to attune yourself to an item you had to learn the items name and all items that could be attuned had a name.

With few exceptions, I'll probably make most magic items +1 with an additional ability or two and as much flavor as I can muster. I'll also try to make "signature items" scale in power with players, if I can find a way to make it happen through the story. I liked "concordance" from 4E artifacts, so I might use that mechanic.

Since I don't have to give out endless magic weapons most magic items will be non-combat items. Magic books, whistles, needles, bags, boots, etc. 

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E-Tallitnics wrote:

 

sleypy wrote:

Could it be bacon with fighter levels? That sounds delicious and there is no reason fighters should be able to do anything bacon cannot.

 

Just make sure to factor in the Monster-Drawing Aroma disadvantage!

 

Oh definitely needs to have that. I think its completely especially since it has this:

 

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Imagine a world where the first-time D&D player rolls stats, picks a race, picks a class, picks an alignment, and buys gear to create a character. Imagine if an experienced player, maybe the person helping our theoretical player learn the ropes, could also make a character by rolling ability scores and picking a race, class, feat, skills, class features, spells or powers, and so on. Those two players used different paths to build characters, but the system design allows them to play at the same table. -Mearl

"It is a general popular error to suppose the loudest complainers for the publick to be the most anxious for its welfare." - Edmund Burke

Sword of Truth

 

Legendary Sword

 

The following information about this sword has to be found out by research/self experiment.

 

The bearer of the sword has to accept the unfiltered truth about her/himself (wis safe DC 20, undead DC 25 with disadvantage).

Anyone hit with the sword has to make a wis save (wis safe DC 20, undead DC 25 with disadvantage).

 

Saved (baerer): The bearer will remain unharmed.

Saved (the attacked one) The person which was hit will be returned to full HP value, the attacker will be reduced to 0 HP, no save.

 

Failed save (bearer): The bearer lets immediately go and can never hold it again without being reduced to 0HP, which he now knows.

Failed Save (the attacked one): The attacked creature takes dmg equal to a crit, as does the attacker.

 

Bearer :Save failed by more than 5: The bearer takes permanent wis and int dmge of dmge=DC-5-save value, is reduced to HP= - con value and makes all death saving throws with disadvantage.

The attacked one: Save failed by more than 5: The attacked creature is reduced to HP= - con value, the bearer takes permanent wis and int dmge of dmge=5, is reduced to HP= - con value and makes all death saving throws with disadvantage.

 

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A little bit of good will is a big step towards making this planet a better place

Lady_Auralla wrote:

I ask this to garner ideas if not outright steal them. Thanks ahead of time to any ideas I pilfer.

 

I am happy that +X is not necessary and I plan on not having them in my campaign hopefully freeing me to give items more interesting abilities thus making the more memorable and fun without having to worry about ever escalating numbers.

 

What will you be doing with items in your game? What item ideas do you have? Also how do you think that differant styles of items will affect campaigns differently? 

 

In terms of 'magic items'...

One of the things I liked least about later eds. of D&D was the 'magic store' concept... which really went to the extreme in 4e. I don't want the players to be able to knip down to Mordenkainen's for a new +'X" Amulet of Protection every time they level up. Magic items should be rare, generally either in the possession of powerful NPC's (friendly and unfriendly) or 'lost in ages past'.

 

Two exceptions -

 

Consumables. Potions, scrolls, elixers and the like will likely be more available. One thing I don't tend to allow is a player to quaff a potion in the middle of combat, I mean as a minor action while engaged in melee. In order to use that sort of item, I like to have the player either disengage and drop back out of combat - or suffer a opportunity attack with advantage.

 

'Masterwork' items. I really liked the concept of 'non magical magic items'... So a player CAN spend his loot to buy a better weapon or suit of armor or shield... which will provide a +1 or even +2  to the appropriate stat - but the item will be mundane with no magical properties. It might be lighter than normal. A suit of 'masterwork light armour' might be wearable by a class or PC who can't normally use armor. It might be a cloak that's designed to blend in (camoflage). Like that.

 

I also lean heavily on Monsters that can only be hit by truely magical weapons, or only take half damage from mundane weapons. That's the big advantage of magical weapons over masterwork weapons. You might have aquired a magic sword who's only power is glow in the presence of enemies. (could be a good or bad thing) But the big edge would be that the weapon does full damage to things like lycanthropes and vampires, as well as other undead like wights, shades, wraiths...

 

I've also adopted the concept of 'leveling magic items' which improve as their owner goes up in levels. I was really inspired by the 4e practice of having the same item repeated at advancing levels with increased pluses. A friend of mine developed a set of pregens that went from Lvl 1 to Lvl 10. Once the character was given a magic item, they'd keep that item...just having it represented by an improved version of the same item in later levels.

Kazadvorn wrote:

In terms of 'magic items'...

One of the things I liked least about later eds. of D&D was the 'magic store' concept... which really went to the extreme in 4e. I don't want the players to be able to knip down to Mordenkainen's for a new +'X" Amulet of Protection every time they level up. Magic items should be rare, generally either in the possession of powerful NPC's (friendly and unfriendly) or 'lost in ages past'.

 

 

I actually have a character that has done some work for Mordenkainen and it turns out that he is not as generous with magical items as you might imagine.  

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DemoMonkey wrote:

I relegate +1 weapon, armour and tool items to the realm of Masterwork; non magical, but made with such craftsmanship or special materials that they have a +1 bonus. It gives players something to do with their money in teh first few levels, and seeking out the master bowmaker/toolmaker/Hattori Hanzo steel can make for fun roleplaying.

 

More or less what I usually do in my games too.

 

If I feel like... I may also add some "special materials" (something like Mithril or whatever I come up with)  that can push this +1 to a +2 or +3... leaving the magic in weapons and armor to other types of bonuses that actually feel more "magical".

Lady_Auralla wrote:

What will you be doing with items in your game? What item ideas do you have? Also how do you think that differant styles of items will affect campaigns differently? 

I've always enjoyed making up items, even doing so on the fly, and will probably continue to do so.  With 5e not having items baked into to game balance, I've largely ignored items when running the playtest and the results were not that bad.  So, I'm thinking items will be very rare and/or mostly for color or plot-devices.  Afterall, a game that's balanced without items could easily become broken with them...

 

 

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Depends if it turns out some of my player are realy missing some of the 4th rdition powers that some people here might discribe as "magical" like cone and get it, there might be magical items that start to show up with item powers that re create some of these 4th edition attacks.

 

I'd like to try magic items as minor 'story items'.  Story items were things like say, magic beans in the fairy tale Jake and the Beanstalk.  They use very little actual game mechanics, instead they allow for scenarios that fall outside the rules of the game.  In the case of the Beanstalk, it existed only to transport Jack to the giant's castle in the sky.  Another example might be Invulnerable Armor that allows the wearer to withstand say, a medusa whose gaze would otherwise instantly kill (the story obstacle).  From Mordenkainen's Magnificent Emporium.

 

I'd like to try that same thing on a smaller scale.  I'm imagining something like the 'artifacts' (as they called them) from the TV show Warehouse 13.  Imagine a gold coin, once carried by Tenser.  The coin came from that first treasure chest that the mage found.  Anyone carrying the coin has unlimited wealth (at least as a story benefit).  These so-called artifacts almost always have a downside to (more than) balance out the good they might bring.  Maybe the money mysteriously comes out of someone else's pockets .

 

Anyway, we've ran two TV-inspired campaigns, one inspired by the Shieldl (where our PCs were corrupt city guards) and another inspired by SG-1 (where our PCs traveled from world-to-world via magical 'runegates').  I haven't worked out all the details on a Warehouse 13 setting yet, but the idea is there.  The trick will be to keep out mechanical effects and let the items move the story.

/\ Art

I am only going to hand out a very few, powerful magic items.  Essentially what were artifacts in 3e.  They will do multiple things and be cool, but there won't be a lot of them.  They will take the place of finding dozens of magic items.  By reducing the numbers, but making them more powerful, it will make magic items magical again.  They won't just be the run of the mill, ho hum, look another item sort of thing.

I always hated making treasure parcels and deciding when and where PCs could find magic items.   Now that the burden to do so is lifted, I feel like I can make the magic they do find more meaningful.

 

I also hated that in the old days, magic items became nearly disposable because PCs would level up and soon the +1 weapon was just not that special.   The +2 or +3 weapon would come along to take it's place.

 

With 5e, I am thinking about having PCs find interesting magical items that they need to come to know and basically befriend as they use them.    If the PC treats the weapon right (and does what it likes or pampers it or treats it with respect, etc.) eventually a new feature may be unlocked.   The idea of sentient magic items with personality has always intrieged me (from 1e days through today).   5e seems to be a very good fit for this type of Item development.

 

 

A Brave Knight of WTF - "Wielder of the Sword of Balance"

 

Rhenny's Blog:  http://community.wizards.com/user/1497701/blog