VALOREIGN - Home Game Development

I was intrigued by Chris Perkins' home campaign for D&D Next, which he detailed in an article almost a year ago. The pdf download has some great material and I eagerly looked forward to reading more about it. Unfortunately (Fortunately? A little of both?) for us, Mr. Perkins is extremely busy with new products and is unlikely to update us on this setting for some time. So I thought I'd play around with it for myself. Then I thought I'd see what others may already have done with it.

The first thing that struck me is that the playtest material changed a lot in the intervening 12 months, but not enough to render the little custom material (elvish firearms) unusable. However, there is no provision made for races and classes that appeared after March 2013. I've been thinking about it, and came up with this option for Warforged PCs:

The Cairnborn (Warforged)

The Night of Wild Magic affected many with its seemingly random changes. However, many other changes were wrought on the land, some of them extremely subtle. Shortly after the Night of Wild Magic, strange creatures emerged from ancient barrows and ruins scattered across the islands, dating from a time before the Severian Empire. These creatures, composed of wood, metal, and stone, and animated by magics unknown or forgotten, claimed no memory of their origins or existence before their recent awakening. Despite these claims, many remain suspicious of their motives and most remain wanderers, welcome nowhere.

     Names: Warforged do not name themselves and most have only recently discovered the need of others to put names to people. Many choose a name relevant to their goals or purposes. Those without such usually accept whatever name or nickname others bestow upon them.

 

A lot still remains to be done. Races to be added include: Dragonborn, Tieflings, Gnomes, and Kender (they could easily fit as River-Folk). The only class to be added is the Bard. Has anybody done this already?

 

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D&D Next: VALOREIGN Home Game Development, Kalani's Homebrew and Original Content | General Campaign Stuff: Bawylie's Budget Dungeons

TiaNadiezja wrote:

Finished another one:

Draconic Legates (Dragonborn)

The dragons who were driven to Valoreign by the encroachment of the Severian Empire were individual creatures of great power, but they were driven from their lairs by the well-disciplined legions of ordinary folk. When the Empire at last arrived to conquer Engweald and Iyarlaan, they found strange dragon-men there before them. It is not certain whether the dragon-men are descended from the dragons or were created by them as agents and soldiers against their foes; what is certain is that the emissaries sent by King Thomas to deliver the tribute of Valoreign are met by these powerful creatures who claim to speak with the voice of the dragons themselves. Enigmatic and feared, the draconic legates sometimes go forth on mysterious errands.

     Male Names: Abraxus, Arjhan, Balasar, Bharash, Donaar, Ghesh, Heskan, Kriv, Medrash, Nadarr, Patrin, Rhasgar, Roghar, Shamash, Shedinn, Torinn

     Female Names: Akra, Biri, Daar, Harann, Kava, Korinn, Mishann, Nala, Perra, Raiann, Sora, Surina, Thava

And another:

     Bard: At home in both the high courts of the land and the lowliest of dockside taverns, bards are a common sight in Valoreign. The majority make their living entertaining the masses as wandering minstrels or troubadours, accompanied by acrobats, tumblers, and clowns in traveling circuses. A small but powerful minority train in specialized academies such as the Sunset College of Arms in Valorstead, or the dwarven Gold Mountain College of Arms in Dwarf Crown; there they learn much of the heraldry and history of the noble families of the isles. These bards usually are sent to the Colleges by a powerful patron who employs them afterwards; some few manage the high costs themselves in the hope of attracting a patron later through their skills and talents.

Chris Perkins' original document had a couple of spells mentioned in the Wild Magic table that were never in the playtest. Looking at them, it was relatively easy to convert to what I think are reasonable 5E versions.

Jump

1st-level transmutation

Casting Time: 1 action

Range: Touch

Duration: 1 minute

Touch a creature that is not affected by this spell. Until the spell ends, that creature’s long jump increases by 10 feet, and high jump increases by 2 feet. The creature has advantage on Dexterity (Athletics) checks to jump.

Tree Shape

2nd-level transmutation

Casting Time: 1 action

Range: Self

Duration: Concentration, up to 1 hour

Until the spell ends, you assume the form of a Large tree or shrub. In this form, you have an AC of 15 and are effectively restrained. Upon close inspection, a creature can make an Intelligence check against your save DC to detect that you are not a tree.

And another race:

Tieflings

Remnants of a great empire long gone to dust, the Tieflings bear the mark of their downfall on their very bodies. Typically, they live solitary lives in the wilderness, although some dwell as honored members of the barbarian tribes. Some tieflings remember their legacy with pride; these all bear the names of ancient emperors and queens. Others turn their back on their dark legacy and take on new names related to whatever purpose they find in life.

     Male Names: Akmenos, Amnon, Barakas, Damakos, Ekemon, Iados, Kairon, Leucis, Melech, Morthos, Pelaios, Skamos, Therai

     Female Names: Akta, Bryseis, Damaia, Ea, Kallista, Lerissa, Makaria, Nemeia, Orianna, Phelaia, Rieta

     Modern Names: Art, Carrion, Chant, Despair, Fear, Gladness, Hope, Ideal, Music, Nowhere, Open, Poetry, Quest, Random, Reverence, Sorrow, Torment, Weary

I was equally impressed by the document.  While I have not thought of just trying to run in myself with my group ( just doesn't sit well with me) I have adopted some of his campaign bible practices because of it.  So far it has helped me cement my ideas and concepts of the world the players are about to enter.  I also like the whole idea behind the night of wild magic.  My only change to that would be how he refers to some people having hideous changes due to the wave of magic, yet doesn't list any kind of mutations from it on players.  I would add the option myself just because some people may like that idea.  (personally I picture WarHammer Chaos warrior's mutations on the barbarian tribes)

 

I might do something similar, it reminds me a lot of the change storms in the Black Company novels and TTRPG campaign setting.

I believe the lack of horrific changes on the list of Wild Magic powers is deliberate. While there are stories to be told about the horrific consequences of unbridled power and the attempt to play God, I prefer to tell less complex stories about more typical heroes. As a result, the spell-like elements on the list are relatively easy to incorporate into the character without making major changes to the concept.

I really like the Night of Wild Magic idea myself. I think I'm going to adopt a variation on it for my own campaign. Since I've already settled on a "chaos / randomness" theme for it, it'll fit right in.

"The Curse of Knowledge: When you know something, it's difficult to imagine what it's like not to know it."

~ Steven Pinker

 

D&D 5e Session Recaps:

Welcome to Icewind Dale (Legacy of the Crystal Shard)

DMing for My Wife (and Our Friends) (Lost Mine of Phandelver)

 

I added the drow to the elf section:

The Engwealdar, the Iyarlandar, the Sylvandar and the Eldandar(Elves)

The reclusive wood elves of Valoreign are called the Engwealdar if they inhabit the misty forests of Engweald or the Iyarlandar if they hail from the dark forests of Iyarlaan. Wood elf havens are ruled by princes and princesses, but there is no singular king or queen to unify them. The mysterious high elves are called the Sylvandar, and they are refugees from the Elder World. Few in number, the Sylvandar lurk among their wood elf cousins and are rarely seen. The suspicious dark elves are called Eldandar, and are also refugees from the Elder World, but apparently of a different faction than the Sylvandar; the two races do not mix in the same community. Elves do not have surnames; however, they are proud of where they live and refer to their homes in their names, as in “Erannon of Emerald Glade” and “Nimmeth of Astramordan.”

I've also tried to come up with something for gnomes, and have finally (after much back-and-forth) decided on this (I'm still not happy with the names of the subraces):

The Galdorfain and the Seidirfain (Gnomes)

Two types of gnomes live in Valoreign. The Galdorfain came to the islands long ago and have hidden themselves among the hillfolk and riverfolk. Among the hillfolk, they generally practice their arts in defense of the reclusive communities, hiding them from view with their illusion. Those who live with the riverfolk act more as soothsayers or fortune-tellers. Recently, however, a different group of gnomes came to Valoreign. Previously a class of magical craftsmen from the Elder World (the Feywild) they fled the madness of that realm with their Sylvandar patrons to find refuge in the Mortal Realm. Some of these Seidirfain tried to settle in with their forest-dwelling cousins, but most make their living in the cities of men or communities of elves.

     Male Names: Alston, Alvyn, Brocc, Eldon, Frug, Kellen, Ku, Nim, Orryn, Pock, Sindri, Warryn, Wrenn

     Female Names: Breena, Carlin, Donella, Ella, Lilli, Lorilla, Nissa, Nyx, Oda, Orla, Roswyn, Tana, Zanna

I finally had a chance to read through this properly last night. I was planning on using the Nentir Vale as my campaign setting, but I have to say it's very tempting to use this instead (subject to some renaming, as some of the names are much too silly for my tastes). I may have to put it to a vote.

"The Curse of Knowledge: When you know something, it's difficult to imagine what it's like not to know it."

~ Steven Pinker

 

D&D 5e Session Recaps:

Welcome to Icewind Dale (Legacy of the Crystal Shard)

DMing for My Wife (and Our Friends) (Lost Mine of Phandelver)

 

I've been busy hashing out my own version of this setting. I didn't particularly like "Valoreign" as a name, so I've changed it to "Valoria". I also need to come up with different names for the main islands, as "Engweal" and "Iyarlaan" are too obvious.

 

With regard to gnomes, specifically, I've settled on the Greyhawk names of Steinneblin and Forstneblin for the rock and forest gnomes respectively (ties in with svirfneblin quite nicely too). I'm also going to go with FR's "Forgotten Folk" term for gnomes as a whole.

 

For the elf subraces, I am tentatively calling the high elves Eldarin (corrupted to "eladrin" in the Valish tongue), the wood elves Sylvarin, and the drow Drokarin. I've made it so the Eldarin are the overlords of the Sylvarin (like Thingol and Legolas of Middle-Earth), while the Drokarin keep to themselves.

 

I'm not a big fan of "Skorinfain" for the dwarves, but I'm still working on replacements for both the mountain dwarves and hill dwarves. I'm thinking something ending in "-ar" to go with "duergar".

"The Curse of Knowledge: When you know something, it's difficult to imagine what it's like not to know it."

~ Steven Pinker

 

D&D 5e Session Recaps:

Welcome to Icewind Dale (Legacy of the Crystal Shard)

DMing for My Wife (and Our Friends) (Lost Mine of Phandelver)

 

But aside from names, you're using it? Cool!

 

The gnome names I picked were based on two different types of traditional Scandinavian/Viking magics. Odin was the master of galdr, while Freyja was the mistress of seidr. There's a lot of opinion (masked as "facts") on what the differences are between the two, but the plain fact is we don't have a lot of written material diffferentiating the two; I basically just picked one for each gnome subrace for no particular reason.

AlHazred wrote:

But aside from names, you're using it? Cool!

More or less, yes. I've actually worked 4e's Nentir Vale into the northern part of the main island, as well.

 

 

The gnome names I picked were based on two different types of traditional Scandinavian/Viking magics. Odin was the master of galdr, while Freyja was the mistress of seidr. There's a lot of opinion (masked as "facts") on what the differences are between the two, but the plain fact is we don't have a lot of written material diffferentiating the two; I basically just picked one for each gnome subrace for no particular reason.
OK.
"The Curse of Knowledge: When you know something, it's difficult to imagine what it's like not to know it."

~ Steven Pinker

 

D&D 5e Session Recaps:

Welcome to Icewind Dale (Legacy of the Crystal Shard)

DMing for My Wife (and Our Friends) (Lost Mine of Phandelver)

 

I've been going over the Wild Magic traits. A couple of them seem potentially problematic; others seem like they could be simplified. For instance:

 

Charm person at will seems a bit overpowered. I don't think I want a PC going around charming everyone they meet. I'm also a bit leery about allowing dispel magic at will. Maybe once per day?

 

I'm also not so fond of the "cannot be surprised" one, simply because there's already a feat that grants that ability.

 

I feel like he kinda went overboard with the animal-based spells, too. There's animal friendship, animal messenger, *and* speak with animals.

 

I also don't get why being immune to cold or fire is good enough on its own, but being immune to lightning isn't, so you get shocking grasp as well. Why not combine immunity to cold with ray of frost and immunity to fire with sacred flame or something?

 

Lastly, some of them seem unnecessary as spells. Take longstrider, for instance. Allowing it to be useable at will is essentially the same as just giving the PC a permanent +10 to their speed, so why not just do that? Same with speak with animals ~ why not just make it a Dr Doolittle kind of deal where the PC can just always understand animals and speak with them?

 

 

EDIT: I've decided to make these a little more elaborate, with some of them having a side effect or drawback.

 

The longstrider one, for instance, I'm calling "Seven League Stride". You can use your action to gain the effect of the longstrider spell without needing any components, but you can only do so freely a number of times per day equal to your Constitution modifier. Any uses beyond that require you to succeed on a Constitution saving throw with a DC of 10 + 1 per use, or you suffer one level of exhaustion.

 

The detect magic one I'm calling "Wizard Eyes", and it allows you to automatically see magical auras within 30 feet of you. Additionally, if you have proficiency in Arcana, you can use your action to determine the school(s) of magic, if there are any. (I figured someone who wasn't trained in Arcana wouldn't have a clue what the schools of magic were, even if they could detect them.)

 

The immune to lightning + shocking grasp one I'm called "Electrified" and it has the additional effect of your hands frequently giving off sparks of static electricity.

"The Curse of Knowledge: When you know something, it's difficult to imagine what it's like not to know it."

~ Steven Pinker

 

D&D 5e Session Recaps:

Welcome to Icewind Dale (Legacy of the Crystal Shard)

DMing for My Wife (and Our Friends) (Lost Mine of Phandelver)

 

I've been sticking with them as-written. For the most part, it's not abusive, it's just an extreme power-up for PCs, when people might normally be used to relatively powerless 1st level characters. The only one that really concerns me is insect plague once per day. That would be a room-cleaner until 8th or 9th level.

Yeah, now that you mention it, I can see insect plague being a bit of an issue. I was going to call that one "Fly Guy" and make it so the person always has some flies buzzing around them. And the spell summons flies not locusts. Maybe I could just decrease the damage or something.

 

I was also thinking some more non-spell abilities could be good, like one trait could grant someone darkvision (or double the range if you already have darkvision) or telepathy.

 

EDIT: Also, it's occurred to me that when at least one or two of my players reads the bit about the nobleman's donkey who gained the ability to speak five languages, they'll want to play that donkey, so I may have to come up with some rules for playing a talking animal. At the moment, I'm thinking of using something similar to the Wild Shape rules, so you have the base physical stats of the animal, but you can roll your own mental stats.

"The Curse of Knowledge: When you know something, it's difficult to imagine what it's like not to know it."

~ Steven Pinker

 

D&D 5e Session Recaps:

Welcome to Icewind Dale (Legacy of the Crystal Shard)

DMing for My Wife (and Our Friends) (Lost Mine of Phandelver)

 

I used something similar to Wild Magic in my Eberron campaign a few years back, but instead having it affect survivors of the Day of Mourning and used warlock invocations to represent the powers they got.*  It worked out pretty well, so I may use this list to do something like it again.

 

* - this campaign was also my stab at using the Gestalt rules from Unearthed Arcana, but I wasn't quite ready to open the door to gestalt completely so I had everyone paired with warlock to avoid the most game-breaking combos I'd heard about.

Wounds Module [updated for Basic]

Proficiency Module

I've been working on my version of the setting, and I got to thinking about the barbarians who worship the evil elemental spirits, and that got me thinking about genasi, and how they could be barbarians who have been "blessed" by the spirits. They may be seen as prophets and war leaders by their fellow tribesmen. I'll need to come up with some stats, in case anyone wants to play one. Since there is an evil elemental spirit of cold (Cryonax) in addition to the usual air, water, earth and fire, I'll need to come up with five "subraces" of genasi.

"The Curse of Knowledge: When you know something, it's difficult to imagine what it's like not to know it."

~ Steven Pinker

 

D&D 5e Session Recaps:

Welcome to Icewind Dale (Legacy of the Crystal Shard)

DMing for My Wife (and Our Friends) (Lost Mine of Phandelver)

 

Genasi have enough popularity I think we'll see them eventually, possibly when they release the 5th edition Forgotten Realms Players' Guide.

 

Somewhere on the forums I saw someone's take on Genasi. I'll have to see if I can find it.

I'm sure they will, although they most likely won't include "cold" genasi. In the meantime, I've started homebrewing some stats that can stand in till we get some official ones.

 

EDIT: Come to think of it, I might forget about genasi as a race for the moment and amp up my elemental-themed Wild Magic Traits instead. Speaking of which, here's what I've got:

 

01-04   Mage Eyes: You can automatically sense the presence of magic within 30 feet of you. If you sense any magic in this way, you can use your action to see a faint aura around any visible creature or object in the area that bears magic (as per the detect magic spell). If you have proficiency in the Arcana skill, you can also determine the relevant school of magic, if any.

 

05-08   Cat's Grace: Your facial features are slightly feline, and you have a habit of purring like a cat when you're happy. In addition, you can use Dexterity (Acrobatics) to climb, and when you fall 20 feet or fewer, you take no damage and land on your feet.

 

09-12   Contortionist: Your body is extremely flexible and stretchy. You are considered to be squeezing only if moving through a space less than 1 foot in diameter, and you can spend 5 feet of movement to automatically escape from nonmagical restraints, such as manacles or a creature that has you grappled. In addition, as a bonus action, you can extend your reach to 10 feet for the next melee attack you make before the end of your turn.

 

13-16   Make Like A Tree: Your skin has a mottled, bark-like texture, and you always seem to have leaves or twigs in your hair. In addition, you can use your action to cause your flesh to become as tough as wood for up to 1 hour, or until your concentration ends. As long as you are not wearing heavy armor, you gain a +2 bonus to AC for the duration (as per the barkskin spell). In addition, once per day, you can use your action to cast the tree shape spell.

 

17-20   Shifter: As an action, you can grow claws or fangs or some other natural weapon of your choice. Your natural weapon deals 1d6 bludgeoning, piercing, or slashing damage, as appropriate, and you are considered proficient with it. Your natural weapon counts as magical and lasts for 1 hour, or until your concentration ends.

 

21-24   Speak in Tongues: You understand any spoken language you hear, and when you speak, any creature that knows at least one language and can hear you understands what you say.

 

25-28   Darkvision: You gain darkvision out to 60 feet. If you already have darkvision because of your race, its range is doubled instead (eg. 60-foot darkvision becomes 120-foot darkvision).

 

29-32   Telekinetic: As an action, you are able to mentally manipulate objects as per the telekinesis spell.

 

33-36   "Earthbound": Your skin has a stony hue to it and feels rough to the touch; you no longer have any hair; and when you speak, there is a faint sound like the roar of an avalanche in your voice. In addition, you have resistance to bludgeoning and piercing damage from nonmagical weapons, and you have advantage on saving throws against being petrified. You can also cast the meld into stone spell once per day.

 

37-40   Flamekissed: Your skin has a reddish hue to it and feels warm to the touch; your hair has turned a fiery red and waves in the air like flames; and when you speak, there is a faint sound like a raging wildfire in your voice. In addition, you have resistance to fire and heat-induced exhaustion, and you also know the hurl flame [a refluffed version of sacred flame] cantrip.

 

41-44   Icebound: Your skin is pale and feels cold to the touch; your hair has turned bluish-white and always has a thin layer of frost on it; and when you speak, there is a faint sound like a whirling snowstorm in your voice. In addition, you have resistance to cold damage and cold-induced exhaustion, and you also know the ray of frost cantrip.

 

45-48   Stormtouched: Tiny, harmless sparks dance around your body as you move, and any hair on your head always stands on end as though statically charged. When you speak, there is a faint sound like the rumble of thunder in your voice. In addition, you have resistance to lightning and thunder damage, and you also know the shocking grasp cantrip.

 

49-52   "Waterborne": Your skin has a faint blue-green tinge to it and is moist to the touch; your hair is perpetually damp; your fingers and toes are webbed; and when you speak, there is a faint sound like crashing waves in your voice. In addition, you have can breathe underwater, and you can swim at your normal land speed. As an action, you can also fill an open container within 30 feet of you with up to 2 gallons of clean water; alternatively, you can create a 30-foot cube of rain within the same range, extinguishing any exposed flames in the area (as per the create or destroy water spell).

 

53-56   Door Lord: At seemingly random times, you catch brief glimpses of mystic doorways leading to other places, usually at the periphery of your vision. In addition, as an action, you can create a portal through which you can teleport to any other spot within 500 feet. It can be a place you can see, one you can visualize, or one you can describe by stating distance and direction (as per the dimension door spell). You can bring along objects as long as their weight doesn't exceed what you can carry. If you would arrive in a place already occupied by an object or creature, you take 4d6 force damage and fail to teleport. You can use this ability a number of times per day equal to your proficiency bonus.

[Inspired by the eponymous creature in the Adventure Time episode "What Was Missing".]

 

57-60   "Trackless": As an action, you can grant yourself the ability to move through any type of natural terrain as per the pass without trace spell. You can also move across any liquid surface as per the water walk spell. While this ability is active, it is impossible to track you except by magical means. The effects last for 1 hour, or until your concentration ends.

 

61-64   Green Thumb: You have an affinity for plants. You can instinctively sense whether a plant is harmful or beneficial. In addition, once per day, you can use your action to cause grasping weeds and vines to sprout from the ground in a 20-foot square centered on you for up to 1 minute, or until your concentration ends (as per the entangle spell). For the duration, the ground in the area is considered difficult terrain. When the effect ends, the conjured plants wilt away. Once per day, you can spend 8 hours communing with nature to enrich the land around you (as per the plant growth spell). Afterwards, all the plants within 150 feet of your location yield twice as much food when harvested for one year.

 

65-68   Skinchanger: You can use your action to touch the mind of a willing beast within 30 feet of you, gaining the ability to see through the beast's eyes and hear through its ears. You can continue to do so until you use your action to stop. While perceiving through the beast's senses, you gain the benefits of any special senses it possessed, but you are blind and deaf to your own surroundings.
[Inspired by the wargs in Game of Thrones.]

 

69-72   Defy Gravity: As an action, you can walk on walls and ceilings as per the spider climb spell.

 

73-76   Fadewalker: As an action, you can cause yourself to randomly blink in and out of the Ethereal Plane for up to 1 minute, or until you choose to end the effect (no action required; as per the blink spell). At the end of each of your turns, roll a d20. On a roll of 11 or higher, you vanish from your current plane of exist and appear in the Ethereal Plane. The effect fails and your action is wasted if you were already on that plane. At the start of your next turn, you return in a space of your choice within 10 feet of the space from which you vanished. Unless you have magic that can reach across planes, you can affect and be affected only by creatures and objects in the Ethereal Plane while you are there. If you roll a 1 on the d20, roll again. If you roll another 1, you are lost in the Ethereal Plane for 2d6 hours. At the end of that time, you reappear as described above.

 

77-80   Spell Reflection: Whenever a spell directly targets you, and you successfully save against it or it misses you, you can use your reaction to choose another creature you can see within 30 feet of you to be the target of the spell instead. This ability does not function against spells that affect an area, such as fireball or cone of cold.

 

81-84   Regeneration: At the start of each of your turns, if you have fewer hit points than your normal hit point maximum, you regain a number of hit points equal to twice your proficiency bonus. This trait ceases to function when you drop to 0 hit points.

 

85-88   Beast Whisperer: You are able to comprehend and communicate with beasts as per the speak with animals spell. In addition, once per day you can use your action to magically compel a Tiny beast to deliver a message for you as per the animal messenger spell.

 

89-92   Seven League Stride: As an action, you can gain the benefit of either the longstrider spell or the jump spell. You can freely use these effects a combined number of times equal to your Constitution modifier. Any usages beyond that place undue strain on your body, requiring you to succeed on a Constitution saving throw with a DC of 10 + 1 per extra use or suffer one level of exhaustion.

 

93-96   Fade Away: Your body is slightly transparent. In addition, you can use your action to fade away completely, becoming invisible--along with anything you are wearing or carrying--for up to 1 hour, or until you attack, cast a spell, or end your concentration (as per the invisibility spell).

 

97-00   Telepath: You can communicate telepathically with any creature within 100 feet of you that understands a language.

 

 

 

FYI: The trait names in quotation marks are temporary; hopefully I'll come up with some better names for them at some point.

 

"The Curse of Knowledge: When you know something, it's difficult to imagine what it's like not to know it."

~ Steven Pinker

 

D&D 5e Session Recaps:

Welcome to Icewind Dale (Legacy of the Crystal Shard)

DMing for My Wife (and Our Friends) (Lost Mine of Phandelver)

 

pukunui wrote:
I just need to come up with one more. I'm toying with a troll-like regeneration ability, but I'm not 100% sure about it yet.
The Bestiary regeneration ability is too powerful to give PCs at first level. Let me recommend the following, which I came up with when I worked up a troll race for D&D Next last month:

 

Regeneration: At the start of your turn, you regain a number of hit points equal to your proficiency bonus. When you take acid or fire damage, your regeneration doesn’t function for the next 10 minutes. You die only if you start your turn with 0 hit points and do not regenerate.

 

Yeah, that's not bad. What do you think of the ones I posted?

 

EDIT: I came up with a choker-like contortionist trait that extends your reach to 10 feet, and lets you squeeze through narrow spaces easily, as well as letting you automatically escape restraints and grapples by spending 5 feet of your movement as per the freedom of movement spell.

"The Curse of Knowledge: When you know something, it's difficult to imagine what it's like not to know it."

~ Steven Pinker

 

D&D 5e Session Recaps:

Welcome to Icewind Dale (Legacy of the Crystal Shard)

DMing for My Wife (and Our Friends) (Lost Mine of Phandelver)

 

AlHazred wrote:

Genasi have enough popularity I think we'll see them eventually, possibly when they release the 5th edition Forgotten Realms Players' Guide.

 

Somewhere on the forums I saw someone's take on Genasi. I'll have to see if I can find it.

 

Even if they're not in FR, I have to believe they'll be in Planescape.  So, I feel positive that we will see them again.  It's just a matter of when.

There are a great many problems that can be circumvented by players and DMs having a mature discussion about what the game is going to be like before they ever sit down together to play.

 

The answer really does lie in more options, not in confining and segregating certain options.

 

You really shouldn't speak for others.  You can't hear what someone else is saying when you try to put your words in their mouth.

 

Fencing & Swashbuckling as Armor.

D20 Modern Toon PC Race.

Mecha Pilot's Skill Challenge Emporium.

 

Save the breasts.

Yes, I'm sure we'll see them in an official 5e capacity at some stage. The question is, will we only see the classic four (earth, air, fire, and water), or will we get stats for the various para-elemental genasi as well (steam, smoke, magma, dust, ice, etc)?

"The Curse of Knowledge: When you know something, it's difficult to imagine what it's like not to know it."

~ Steven Pinker

 

D&D 5e Session Recaps:

Welcome to Icewind Dale (Legacy of the Crystal Shard)

DMing for My Wife (and Our Friends) (Lost Mine of Phandelver)

 

pukunui wrote:

Yes, I'm sure we'll see them in an official 5e capacity at some stage. The question is, will we only see the classic four (earth, air, fire, and water), or will we get stats for the various para-elemental genasi as well (steam, smoke, magma, dust, ice, etc)?

 

I don't know.  I am inclined to think that the answer to that is rooted in the past cosmology L&L article.  I don't recall if they mentioned having the para- and quazi- elemental planes.  If they did, I would again say that even if those para-genasai aren't in FR they'll likely be in Planescape.

There are a great many problems that can be circumvented by players and DMs having a mature discussion about what the game is going to be like before they ever sit down together to play.

 

The answer really does lie in more options, not in confining and segregating certain options.

 

You really shouldn't speak for others.  You can't hear what someone else is saying when you try to put your words in their mouth.

 

Fencing & Swashbuckling as Armor.

D20 Modern Toon PC Race.

Mecha Pilot's Skill Challenge Emporium.

 

Save the breasts.

With their current emphasis on simplicity, I think we'll see a generic genasi basis, with slight variations for different types; like in 4E but vastly simplified and with abilities drawn from the fluff text. At least, that's what I hope will happen.

 

A while back I made this version of the genasi based mostly on The Planeswalker's Handbook (2nd edition). Took me a while to locate it on my hard drive:

Traits

As a genasi, you have the following racial traits.

     Ability Score Adjustment: Your starting Constitution score increases by 1.

     Size: Medium.

     Speed: 30 feet.

     Languages: You can speak, read, and write Common, and the dialect of Primordial correspond-ing to your elemental heritage.

     Subrace: Choose a subrace. Four subraces are described here: air genasi, earth genasi, fire genasi, and water genasi.

Air Genasi

Air genasi, also known as “wind dukes,” are commonly flighty and pretentious by nature. They usually display one or more of the following traits: light blue skin or hair; a light breeze blowing about them at all times; a breathy voice with strange inflections and accent; or, flesh that is cool to the touch.

     Ability Score Adjustment: Your Dexterity score increases by 1.

     Elemental Heritage (Air): You have advantage on saving throws against lightning and thunder damage. In addition, you do not need to breathe.

     Mingling With the Wind: You can jump twice as far as indicated by your Strength. When you reach 5th level, you can cast the levitate spell once per day.

Earth Genasi

Earth genasi (called “stone princes”) are often immovable and ponderous by nature. They usually display one or more of the following traits: brown, leathery skin; a metallic sheen to their skin or hair; blocky features; thick torsos and limbs; brown, black, or gray hair; rough features; deep, slow speech; or, black eyes like deep pits.

     Ability Score Adjustment: Your Strength score increases by 1.

     Elemental Heritage (Earth): You have resistance to piercing damage from nonmagical weapons.

     Merging With the Stone: When you reach 5th level, you can cast the pass without trace spell once per day.

Fire Genasi

Fire genasi, sometimes titled “flame lords,” are frequently energetic, high-strung, and quick to act. They usually display one or more of the following traits: deep red or coal black skin; deep red hair like fire; a voice crackling like burning embers; warm flesh, even hot to the touch; fiery red, glowing eyes.

     Ability Score Adjustment: Your Intelligence score increases by 1.

     Elemental Heritage (Fire): You have advantage on saving throws against fire damage.

     Darkvision: You can see in darkness within 60 feet of you as if it were dim light. When you do so, your vision is in black and white.

     Reaching To the Blaze: When you reach 3rd level, you can cast the burning hands spell once per day.

Water Genasi

Water genasi title themselves as “sea kings” or “sea queens;” most have curious and independent natures, with strong personalities. They usually display one or more of the following traits: blue-green skin or hair; blue-black eyes; a slight layer of scales covering the body; hair that sways as if underwater; a muffled voice, echoing like whalesong; or, cold, clammy flesh.

     Ability Score Adjustment: Your Charisma score increases by 1.

     Elemental Heritage (Water): You have advantage on saving throws against acid damage.

     Aquatic: You can breathe underwater, and being underwater imposes no penalty on your attack rolls or ability checks.

     Calling To the Water: When you reach 3rd level, you can cast the create or destroy water spell once per day (only to create water).

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