Lycanthropy?

Hey gang!

I didn't think I would actually have to look this up but DMing my last D&D encoutner session (Muder in Baldur's Gate) a character actually failed the lowly DC 9 Con check (even with Bless) and contracted lycanthropy. I figured it makes for great running tension and he is fine with it, however I have not found any rules om lycanthropy for D&D Next. I find it odd that there isn't anything laid out when they had a monster in the supplement that could give it. So I had some questions about it if anyone is able to help out.

  • How is it cured
  • How long does it take to set in
  • What are the effects - Are there any benefits
  • Other rules I should know about it

Thanks for any help you could off.

BW

If you can get your hands on it, Van Richten's Guide to Werebeasts is the best source for this information.  

 


This reminds me, am I the only one who's really hoping for some creature templates? They're such a fun way to add variety to encounters and easily make up new monsters. Lycanthropic, ghost, vampiric, zombified... have we seen any hint that we'll get ways to customize monsters beyond the little customization boxes a few of them have in the Beastiary?

"In this world.., you must be oh so smart or oh so pleasant. Well, for years I was smart. I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

Elwood/James Stewart [link]
 
Were you a D&D Next playtester? If so, you'll be able to access this elegant and finely-crafted set of BOOKMARKED PDFS! Every file has been bookmarked, linked, and annotated to make your life easier when looking up that one rule you always forget!

I would allow a Lesser Restoration spell to remove the lycanthropy, if it is cast upon the victim before the first full moon after contracting the lycanthropy (when the victim would be forced into its first shape change).

After that, I would require a Remove Curse spell to remove the lycanthropy.

 

EDIT: As to the effects, I would use a "stages" system; like 4th Edition did with diseases:

Lycanthropy

Stage 1: Prior to first full moon after contracting lycanthropy; no shape change has occured; Lesser Restoration to remove.

Stage 2: Past first full moon after contracting lycanthropy and initial forced shape change into hybrid form; forced shape change during full moon (hybrid form only); victim is handled as NPC during shape change; Remove Curse to remove.

Stage 3: Past 1 year after contracting lycanthropy and after 12 forced shape changes; access to complete animal form, but still forced change into hybrid form during full moon (as NPC); at-will changes into either form for CON Mod times per day; shift of alignment one step closer to evil; Remove Curse to remove.

Stage 4: Past 2 years after contracting lycanthropy and after 24 forced shape changes; no longer forced shape changes during full moon; at-will shape changes into either form for CON Mod times per day; shift of alignment to evil, if not already evil; Remove Curse to remove.

 

The alignment restrictions are only there to make lycanthropy continue to be an undesired effect. In my campaign world, lycanthropy is not evil; so, Stage 4 lycanthropy can be a desired effect (complete control of shape changing, without drawbacks). In fact, there is a minor healing effect from shape changing in my campaign world.

Sometimes in the past I have suggested the idea of a module about "negative templates", a long-time penalty caused by supernatural curses, poisons, diseases or fatal injuries. If the PC survive enough time, or heal the negative template of other, there would a extra XP reward, like when a traps is disarmed. 

I would like the special monster attacks could be customizable, and to recover the idea of template classes from "savage progression" articles in the D&D web.

 

* If you wish a shapesifter class like a mixture of barbarian and totemist, I suggest the name "nahual". from American folclore, a concept closer to "totem".

 

 

 

"Say me what you're showing off for, and I'll say you what you lack!" (Spanish saying)

 

Book 13 Anaclet 23 Confucius said: "The Superior Man is in harmony but does not follow the crowd. The inferior man follows the crowd, but is not in harmony"

 

"In a country well governed, poverty is something to be ashamed of. In a country badly governed, wealth is something to be ashamed of." - Confucius 

Luis_Carlos wrote:

Sometimes in the past I have suggested the idea of a module about "negative templates", a long-time penalty caused by supernatural curses, poisons, diseases or fatal injuries. If the PC survive enough time, or heal the negative template of other, there would a extra XP reward, like when a traps is disarmed.

I would like the special monster attacks could be customizable, and to recover the idea of template classes from "savage progression" articles in the D&D web.

 

* If you wish a shapesifter class like a mixture of barbarian and totemist, I suggest the name "nahual". from American folclore, a concept closer to "totem".

 

 

 

I like the negative template idea.

I have used the notion of a skills check, where if you succeed, you keep control of the character while in wolf or hybrid form.

Mechagamera wrote:

 

Luis_Carlos wrote:

Sometimes in the past I have suggested the idea of a module about "negative templates", a long-time penalty caused by supernatural curses, poisons, diseases or fatal injuries. If the PC survive enough time, or heal the negative template of other, there would a extra XP reward, like when a traps is disarmed.

I would like the special monster attacks could be customizable, and to recover the idea of template classes from "savage progression" articles in the D&D web.

 

* If you wish a shapesifter class like a mixture of barbarian and totemist, I suggest the name "nahual". from American folclore, a concept closer to "totem".

 

 

 

 

I like the negative template idea.

I have used the notion of a skills check, where if you succeed, you keep control of the character while in wolf or hybrid form.

I suggested something like that once (maybe even to you, it was a while ago). Every round the player has to roll a Charisma check to see whether the player or the DM controls the character. That way the player can experience the loss of control that makes lycanthropy a curse while still playing an active role in the game.

 

Trigger: The character takes the form of a werewolf during a full moon. (Option: The time a character spends as a werewolf depends on the phase of the moon, so a half moon would make the character a werewolf for half the night.)

Effect: While in the form of a werewolf, the character gets +4 Strength, +4 Dexterity, resistance to all damage except silver, low-light vision, +10 movement speed, and +5 to perception checks. They also gain two attack options. First, they get a bite attack for 1d8 + Strength damage, plus the target must make a DC 10 Constitution save to resist lycanthropy. Second, they get two claw attacks for 1d6 + Strength or Dexterity each. Every round, the affected character must make a DC 15 Charisma save. Failed save: The player loses control of the character, and the character acts like an unthinking bloodthirsty beast for that round.

Cure: Depends on the adventure. If this is a major plot point, the cure could involve a quest for exotic plants or potion ingredients. If this is meant to be a minor inconvenience, a simple Remove Curse spell will work.

Fimbria wrote:

 

Mechagamera wrote:

 

Luis_Carlos wrote:

Sometimes in the past I have suggested the idea of a module about "negative templates", a long-time penalty caused by supernatural curses, poisons, diseases or fatal injuries. If the PC survive enough time, or heal the negative template of other, there would a extra XP reward, like when a traps is disarmed.

I would like the special monster attacks could be customizable, and to recover the idea of template classes from "savage progression" articles in the D&D web.

 

* If you wish a shapesifter class like a mixture of barbarian and totemist, I suggest the name "nahual". from American folclore, a concept closer to "totem".

 

 

 

 

I like the negative template idea.

I have used the notion of a skills check, where if you succeed, you keep control of the character while in wolf or hybrid form.

 

I suggested something like that once (maybe even to you, it was a while ago). Every round the player has to roll a Charisma check to see whether the player or the DM controls the character. That way the player can experience the loss of control that makes lycanthropy a curse while still playing an active role in the game.

 

Trigger: The character takes the form of a werewolf during a full moon. (Option: The time a character spends as a werewolf depends on the phase of the moon, so a half moon would make the character a werewolf for half the night.)

Effect: While in the form of a werewolf, the character gets +4 Strength, +4 Dexterity, resistance to all damage except silver, low-light vision, +10 movement speed, and +5 to perception checks. They also gain two attack options. First, they get a bite attack for 1d8 + Strength damage, plus the target must make a DC 10 Constitution save to resist lycanthropy. Second, they get two claw attacks for 1d6 + Strength or Dexterity each. Every round, the affected character must make a DC 15 Charisma save. Failed save: The player loses control of the character, and the character acts like an unthinking bloodthirsty beast for that round.

Cure: Depends on the adventure. If this is a major plot point, the cure could involve a quest for exotic plants or potion ingredients. If this is meant to be a minor inconvenience, a simple Remove Curse spell will work.

Sorry, didn't mean to steal an idea.  Old DM moment.   I don't remember ever seeing the save every round, but I like it.  I have used it at time of transformation and (back in 4e) whenever anyone in the werewolf's general area got bloodied (second only to the monster manuals, bloodied was my favorite 4e thing).  The per round save is more dramatic, since no one will want to be too close to the werewolf, but you don't want to attack it until the failed save either.

Here are the rules that I use. 

If the character eats belladonna within an hour of the attack, there is a 25% chance this will cure the affliction; it definitely incapacitates the character for 1d4 days. Note that only a sprig of belladonna need be eaten, and it must be reasonably fresh (picked within the last week). If too much is eaten, the character may still be cured, but is incapacitated for 2d4 days.

The only other way to lift the affliction is to cast a remove curse on the character, on the night of a full moon, or the night immediately preceding or following the full moon. After remove curse is cast, if the character makes a successful saving throw vs. polymorph, the curse is broken. Otherwise the changes take place and the spell has no effect. Cure disease and other healing spells and abilities have no effect against lycanthropy.

Only infected lycanthropes can be cured. To a true lycanthrope, lycanthropy is as natural as breathing, and the condition cannot be altered. True lycanthropes have complete control over their physical states; they are not affected by darkness, phases of the moon, or any of the other situations which traditionally affect infected lycanthropes.


Have him kill a close friend in his sleep during a fullmoon, oh sorry thats a werecar.

These new forums are terrible.

I misspell words on purpose too draw out grammer nazis.

dmgorgon wrote:

Here are the rules that I use.

 

If the character eats belladonna within an hour of the attack, there is a 25% chance this will cure the affliction; it definitely incapacitates the character for 1d4 days.

For a second I read that as "it definitely decapitates the character..."

"In this world.., you must be oh so smart or oh so pleasant. Well, for years I was smart. I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

Elwood/James Stewart [link]
 
Were you a D&D Next playtester? If so, you'll be able to access this elegant and finely-crafted set of BOOKMARKED PDFS! Every file has been bookmarked, linked, and annotated to make your life easier when looking up that one rule you always forget!

Mechagamera wrote:

 

Fimbria wrote:

 

Mechagamera wrote:

 

Luis_Carlos wrote:

Sometimes in the past I have suggested the idea of a module about "negative templates", a long-time penalty caused by supernatural curses, poisons, diseases or fatal injuries. If the PC survive enough time, or heal the negative template of other, there would a extra XP reward, like when a traps is disarmed.

I would like the special monster attacks could be customizable, and to recover the idea of template classes from "savage progression" articles in the D&D web.

 

* If you wish a shapesifter class like a mixture of barbarian and totemist, I suggest the name "nahual". from American folclore, a concept closer to "totem".

 

 

 

 

I like the negative template idea.

I have used the notion of a skills check, where if you succeed, you keep control of the character while in wolf or hybrid form.

 

I suggested something like that once (maybe even to you, it was a while ago). Every round the player has to roll a Charisma check to see whether the player or the DM controls the character. That way the player can experience the loss of control that makes lycanthropy a curse while still playing an active role in the game.

 

Trigger: The character takes the form of a werewolf during a full moon. (Option: The time a character spends as a werewolf depends on the phase of the moon, so a half moon would make the character a werewolf for half the night.)

Effect: While in the form of a werewolf, the character gets +4 Strength, +4 Dexterity, resistance to all damage except silver, low-light vision, +10 movement speed, and +5 to perception checks. They also gain two attack options. First, they get a bite attack for 1d8 + Strength damage, plus the target must make a DC 10 Constitution save to resist lycanthropy. Second, they get two claw attacks for 1d6 + Strength or Dexterity each. Every round, the affected character must make a DC 15 Charisma save. Failed save: The player loses control of the character, and the character acts like an unthinking bloodthirsty beast for that round.

Cure: Depends on the adventure. If this is a major plot point, the cure could involve a quest for exotic plants or potion ingredients. If this is meant to be a minor inconvenience, a simple Remove Curse spell will work.

 

Sorry, didn't mean to steal an idea.  Old DM moment.   I don't remember ever seeing the save every round, but I like it.  I have used it at time of transformation and (back in 4e) whenever anyone in the werewolf's general area got bloodied (second only to the monster manuals, bloodied was my favorite 4e thing).  The per round save is more dramatic, since no one will want to be too close to the werewolf, but you don't want to attack it until the failed save either.

You were doing it back in 4E? Then I might have stolen it from you instead. The bloodied thing is interesting. Seems like it would force the other players to change tactics and try to avoid bleeding like there's a shark in the water. Very cool.

Do you rebember "Buffy vampire slayer"? Those werewolves weren´t the most terrorific creatures. A cursed only needed be chained for the fullmoon, or within in a cage. 

My own idea of lycanthropy is a concept close to the manga "Crying freeman". The cursed one is possessed by a killer spirit to be a supernatural assasin (usually vampire, hags, fays and other paranormal creatures). If the cursed doesn´t cooperate the curse will be activacted for full moon to kill the loved beings. 

Other option is the biten by werewolves don´t become lycanthropes but infected with a diseased like the furious no-zombies from "28 days later"

There are some movies about werewolves (The curse, In the company of wolves, ginger snaps...). Have you seen the comic "Ferals" by Avatar Press (the same publisher of "Crossed").

For me werewolves are one of best antagonist and natural enemies/predator for monsters PCs or vampires.  

---

What if a a pack of true werewolves catch a live troll and they use him like food source? His power of regeneration could be used to ge new meat.  

 

 

"Say me what you're showing off for, and I'll say you what you lack!" (Spanish saying)

 

Book 13 Anaclet 23 Confucius said: "The Superior Man is in harmony but does not follow the crowd. The inferior man follows the crowd, but is not in harmony"

 

"In a country well governed, poverty is something to be ashamed of. In a country badly governed, wealth is something to be ashamed of." - Confucius 

Fralex wrote:

This reminds me, am I the only one who's really hoping for some creature templates? They're such a fun way to add variety to encounters and easily make up new monsters. Lycanthropic, ghost, vampiric, zombified... have we seen any hint that we'll get ways to customize monsters beyond the little customization boxes a few of them have in the Beastiary?

If WotC would get with the 21st century and make a digital bestiary this would be possible.  Example:

  1. Click the "humanoid" and "aquatic" filters.
  2. Scan the list...sea elves, no...lizardfolk. Perfect.
  3. Adjust the level slider to 8.  Stats and treasure update automatically.
  4. Check off the "Shaman" option. Spells generated.
  5. Click the "Random Racial Name" button.  Cool name generated.
  6. Finally, click the "Lycanthrope" option, and from the popup that appears choose "Shark". Special abilities added, with notes about contracting lycanthrope.
  7. Send to Printer.

There.  You now have a named level 8 lizardfolk shaman were-shark.

And then you wake up and realize that all Lizardfolk are identical level 2 warriors because WotC is stuck in the Gutenberg era.

EDIT: Alternate Step #7: Drag and drop N'zzt the Were-Shark onto your Virtual Table Top.

"Therefore, you are the crapper, I'm merely the vessel through which you crap." -- akaddk

Elfcrusher wrote:

 

Fralex wrote:

This reminds me, am I the only one who's really hoping for some creature templates? They're such a fun way to add variety to encounters and easily make up new monsters. Lycanthropic, ghost, vampiric, zombified... have we seen any hint that we'll get ways to customize monsters beyond the little customization boxes a few of them have in the Beastiary?

 

If WotC would get with the 21st century and make a digital bestiary this would be possible.  Example:

  1. Click the "humanoid" and "aquatic" filters.
  2. Scan the list...sea elves, no...lizardfolk. Perfect.
  3. Adjust the level slider to 8.  Stats and treasure update automatically.
  4. Check off the "Shaman" option. Spells generated.
  5. Click the "Random Racial Name" button.  Cool name generated.
  6. Finally, click the "Lycanthrope" option, and from the popup that appears choose "Shark". Special abilities added, with notes about contracting lycanthrope.
  7. Send to Printer.

There.  You now have a named level 8 lizardfolk shaman were-shark.

And then you wake up and realize that all Lizardfolk are identical level 2 warriors because WotC is stuck in the Gutenberg era.

EDIT: Alternate Step #7: Drag and drop N'zzt the Were-Shark onto your Virtual Table Top.

I could definitely get behind this. A tag-sorted monster database alone would be pretty handy, and a template-adding tool would be gravy on top.

I would like a "D&D Spore", with creation of monsters and added powers.

A new D&D Insider where you could "customize your monster PC or magic pet would need a great playtest to find possible abuses by munchkins. 

 

"Say me what you're showing off for, and I'll say you what you lack!" (Spanish saying)

 

Book 13 Anaclet 23 Confucius said: "The Superior Man is in harmony but does not follow the crowd. The inferior man follows the crowd, but is not in harmony"

 

"In a country well governed, poverty is something to be ashamed of. In a country badly governed, wealth is something to be ashamed of." - Confucius 

Fimbria wrote:

 

Mechagamera wrote:

 

Fimbria wrote:

 

Mechagamera wrote:

 

Luis_Carlos wrote:

Sometimes in the past I have suggested the idea of a module about "negative templates", a long-time penalty caused by supernatural curses, poisons, diseases or fatal injuries. If the PC survive enough time, or heal the negative template of other, there would a extra XP reward, like when a traps is disarmed.

I would like the special monster attacks could be customizable, and to recover the idea of template classes from "savage progression" articles in the D&D web.

 

* If you wish a shapesifter class like a mixture of barbarian and totemist, I suggest the name "nahual". from American folclore, a concept closer to "totem".

 

 

 

 

I like the negative template idea.

I have used the notion of a skills check, where if you succeed, you keep control of the character while in wolf or hybrid form.

 

I suggested something like that once (maybe even to you, it was a while ago). Every round the player has to roll a Charisma check to see whether the player or the DM controls the character. That way the player can experience the loss of control that makes lycanthropy a curse while still playing an active role in the game.

 

Trigger: The character takes the form of a werewolf during a full moon. (Option: The time a character spends as a werewolf depends on the phase of the moon, so a half moon would make the character a werewolf for half the night.)

Effect: While in the form of a werewolf, the character gets +4 Strength, +4 Dexterity, resistance to all damage except silver, low-light vision, +10 movement speed, and +5 to perception checks. They also gain two attack options. First, they get a bite attack for 1d8 + Strength damage, plus the target must make a DC 10 Constitution save to resist lycanthropy. Second, they get two claw attacks for 1d6 + Strength or Dexterity each. Every round, the affected character must make a DC 15 Charisma save. Failed save: The player loses control of the character, and the character acts like an unthinking bloodthirsty beast for that round.

Cure: Depends on the adventure. If this is a major plot point, the cure could involve a quest for exotic plants or potion ingredients. If this is meant to be a minor inconvenience, a simple Remove Curse spell will work.

 

Sorry, didn't mean to steal an idea.  Old DM moment.   I don't remember ever seeing the save every round, but I like it.  I have used it at time of transformation and (back in 4e) whenever anyone in the werewolf's general area got bloodied (second only to the monster manuals, bloodied was my favorite 4e thing).  The per round save is more dramatic, since no one will want to be too close to the werewolf, but you don't want to attack it until the failed save either.

 

You were doing it back in 4E? Then I might have stolen it from you instead. The bloodied thing is interesting. Seems like it would force the other players to change tactics and try to avoid bleeding like there's a shark in the water. Very cool.

I didn't look at the forums until midway into the playtest, so we might of come up with it independently--I prefer to think of it as great minds think alike.....

The first fight was ugly (an ogre got bloodied and the werewolf became a hazard, attacking anything that flanked it).  My group came up with strategies for the second fight, but I put that off for a while (no use having full moons every night) and they got a cure in the meantime.  I offered to infect someone else if they wanted to test their plans, but they declined and targetted werewolves with extreme prejudice from then on.

 

Why is it a CHA save? Shouldn't it be a Endurance check?