Dragon 375 - D&D Insider Playtest: The Monk

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Dragon 375
D&D Insider Playtest: The Monk

By Rob Heinsoo and Mike Mearls

D&D Insider brings you another exclusive playtest opportunity with a first look at the monk from Player's Handbook 3. One build from the upcoming release is presented here, featuring thirty levels of options.

Talk about this Playtest here.

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I'm not sure whether I understand full disciplines--are they like stances, where if I use my encounter full discipline, I can only use one of its powers once per round but it stays indefinitely... or is it just another power, but it has TWO options for what I do with it instead of just being an attack?
Seconded. I don't get Full Disciplines. Do they take an action (free action) to activate? Do they stay "on" for the rest of the encounter or until you use a new one, or only for the rest of the round? If they're an Encounter power, can you use both the move and the attack, or only one? If I use an Action Point to switch to a new Full Discipline, is it expended? Do I get to use one of its actions that turn or have I used up my action by switching?

Very confused. It looks like it could be a decent concept, and not too hard to understand, if only it were explained in the article by way of an example.

When it says "I can only use one full discipline power per round", does it mean I can use EITHER the attack or move? Or does it mean I can only change my full discipline once per round, but use both powers during the round?

I want to also mention that there's a growing trend in the PHB2 and the Power books to create classes and builds that stray further and further from the core mechanics, with larger and more complicated rules exceptions supporting them. It's the feeling that I got from the Vestige Warlock and it's what I'm getting here. It's a bit confusing as a player, it's possibly an ongoing problem for future items/feats that have to consider many different ways that a character can behave, and it's an issue for DMs or players who may not be across all the released material to date, who look at a new class being played and say, "Sorry, you're doing WHAT?"

I'd prefer new classes that do new and interesting things with the existing mechanics (ie Avenger) than old, returning classes that have to be awkwardly shoehorned into the rules.
How full discipline works:

You can use either of the sub-powers of a full discipline power by spending the appropriate action. The full discipline power becomes your discipline for that turn. Once you have your discipline set, you can only use sub-powers from that power, or use non-full discipline powers.

Furthermore, if it was an encounter full discipline power, you can only use each sub-power once per round, and the power is expended once you first use either of its sub-powers.

If you action point, you can use any sub-power from any full discipline power. If you do, that power becomes your discipline; you expand that power as normal.

For example:
You could use Cobra Strike to either move your speed +2 then attack vs Reflex, or vice versa.
You cannot use Cobra Strike to attack, then Five Storms to shift 2, unless you use an action point on the move
You could use Five Storms, shift 2, then AP to shift 2 again
You cannot use Open the Gate of Battle to attack, move w/out OAs, then AP to move w/out OAs again, since it's an encounter power. You could AP to shift 2 squares through Five Storms, however.
How full discipline works:
....

Furthermore, if it was an encounter full discipline power, you can only use each sub-power once per round, and the power is expended once you first use either of its sub-powers.

Take the level 27 encounter attack power that grants a shift of 4 squares if used as movement.

By your logic, I can use that power's movement technique, then the encounter power ends and is expended.

So, by your logic, I can either...

A) Spend a move action to shift 4 squares, then use my other move to just move regularly since I can't shift techniques or use the prior technique again in the same round.

or B) Just shift twice using your at-will movement power, which you can use multiple times per round.

I'm sorry, but the difference between a level 27 encounter power and a level 1 at-will with no level-based scaling should _NOT_ be so narrow.

I definitely think it's more of a stance thing.

Unless that's what your saying? But that it's expended FOR THAT ROUND? Or do we get both techniques before it's COMPLETELY expended? Except I didn't read that...

Wizards, I like the Monk, but it's confusing.
Do monks not get 22nd level utility powers?
How full discipline works:

I think I follow that. You're saying it is like a stance - you expend it once you use either of its powers, those powers become an ongoing additional option in addition to your regular move and standard actions, and you retain access to those powers, to be used as many times as you like, until either:
(a) the encounter ends, or
(b) you use a different full discipline.

You can only use powers from two different full disciplines in the same round if you spend an action point to do it.
YEAH!

*Jumps for joy*

Actually, my monk jumps... to the next opponent!

Those are some cool features. Although the Full Disicpline sidebar is a little confusing. But I think I get the gist of it.

I'm not sure if the jump is any better than a shift, but it's certainly cool.

Glad to see the monk in 4e. I can rest easy now.
The way I read it is that you can:

1. Use both parts of the discipline - the attack, and the move - and then you have a minor action left.

2. Use the attack part, but your regular move. You still have your minor.

3. Use the move part, but a different standard action (like Second Wind) (again, you've still got a minor also).


In whatever case, if you use any part of an Encounter or Daily power, you expend it. As for "ongoing" options; this all happens in the space of a turn so they're not stances. Obviously, I could be wrong, but that's how I read it.
In whatever case, if you use any part of an Encounter or Daily power, you expend it. As for "ongoing" options; this all happens in the space of a turn so they're not stances. Obviously, I could be wrong, but that's how I read it.

Well, given the power level of these options, wouldn't that be a little... crap? Surely they have to be like stances to be balanced?
So, by your logic, I can either...

A) Spend a move action to shift 4 squares, then use my other move to just move regularly since I can't shift techniques or use the prior technique again in the same round.

or B) Just shift twice using your at-will movement power, which you can use multiple times per round.

Correct; but if you want to shift 4 and attack without using an action point, A is your only option.

I'm sorry, but the difference between a level 27 encounter power and a level 1 at-will with no level-based scaling should _NOT_ be so narrow.

Compare the attack techniques; that's where most of the power increase is. If the movement part were equivalently increased in power, it would be like getting a free encounter utility. That would be too much.

I definitely think it's more of a stance thing.

To my knowledge there has never been an encounter-power stance.

I admit the rules don't explicitely preclude a stance-like interpretation, however if full disciplines do act as stances, why would it only apply to the move action part and not the standard action part? Then you could use encounter level attacks (and I don't think the Monk encounter attacks are significantly weaker than other classes') all encounter long. I'd say that's a solid reductio ad absurdum argument against your interpretation.

I think I follow that. You're saying it is like a stance

No; I said the power defines your discipline for that turn (only).
I think they act kind of like pairs of actions. Or like a stance that can only last for one round.

You can use one of the techniques provided, or both, or maybe even the same one twice, but can't mix the pairs without using an action point.

I think the main idea of them is that you use your move action to use the movement technique to get in and then your standard action to use the attack technique.

It's a way of encouraging the character to move around in special ways that are linked thematically with the attack they deliver.

The 27th level encounter power is good, not only because you can shift 4 squares as your move action, but that in the same round you can also cause every enemy within 2 squares of your new position to attack each other.

What discipline you use in one turn does not affect your choices in another turn, except that obviously once you have expended an encounter power you can't use it again in that encounter.
Well, given the power level of these options, wouldn't that be a little... crap? Surely they have to be like stances to be balanced?

Why? Remember, these are encounter powers, not dailies. You get an attack that's in the same approximate power level as other classes' encounter power attacks (perhaps on the low end), plus one-time-use of an improved movement action. I don't see anything wrong with that. At most you're trading a little raw offensive power for better mobility. It's kind of like Warlocks -- they trade raw damage output for controller-type side effects. Whether that's a good trade is, of course, up for debate.
I think they act kind of like pairs of actions. Or like a stance that can only last for one round.

You can use one of the techniques provided, or both, or maybe even the same one twice, but can't mix the pairs without using an action point.

I think the main idea of them is that you use your move action to use the movement technique to get in and then your standard action to use the attack technique.

It's a way of encouraging the character to move around in special ways that are linked thematically with the attack they deliver.

The 27th level encounter power is good, not only because you can shift 4 squares as your move action, but that in the same round you can also cause every enemy within 2 squares of your new position to attack each other.

What discipline you use in one turn does not affect your choices in another turn, except that obviously once you have expended an encounter power you can't use it again in that encounter.

This^

To summarize from the Full Discipline sidebar:

1) Use the full discipline power. You cannot use another one this round unless you spend an action point.

2) You can use the move technique and the attack technique of the power in any order. If the power is an encounter power, you can only use these techniques once. if it is at will, you could use either or both any number of times so long as you have actions to do so.

--
Another way to put it is to reword the power. Here's an encounter example.

Drunken Monkey Monk Attack 1
Full Discipline
You gain the following encounter powers until the start of your next turn. You cannot use another full discipline this round unless you spend an action point to do so.

Attack Technique
Encounter * Implement, Psionic
Standard Action Melee touch
Target: One creature
Attack: Dexterity vs. Will
Hit: 1d6 + Dexterity modifier damage, and you slide
the target 1 square. The target then makes a melee
basic attack as a free action against an enemy of your
choice. The target gains a bonus to the attack roll
equal to your Wisdom modifier.

Movement Technique
Encounter
Move Action Personal
Effect: You move your speed + 2. During this
movement, you ignore difficult terrain and gain a
power bonus to all defenses against opportunity
attacks triggered by the movement. The power bonus
equals your Wisdom modifier.
If you think of the actions as a pair, does that mean you can't use a minor action between them?
yes, you can use a minor action between the two.

Reading it thoroughly, I'm really starting to like the class. It's strange as a psionic class, and the guys with Design and Development even said it only fits there because it doesn't fit somewhere else; which kinda bugs me. But, it's a pretty cool concept I look forward to playtesting. Maybe a wilden monk... hmm, I guess we'll see.
Monks were conceptualized to be masters at moving during combat so in order to help facilitate that the came up with Full Disciplines a beautiful concept which is horribly explained.

Start of the round you should determine which Full Discipline you are going to have active this round.
Basically activating a Full Discipline is a free action you may do once per round. A Full Discipline is active until the end of your round
While a Full Discipline is active you may only use non full discipline powers or the effects listed under the Full Discipline you have chosen.
If you have chose Fire Storm as your Full Discipline active this round you may use a basic move, or its shift of 2 as your move action; and you may use its burst attack or expend a daily attack power (or an out of class encounter encounter power) as your standard action.
If you are using an encounter Full Discipline you may only use each effect once per encounter regardless of the number of action you have available
So if you chose to expend an AP to gain a second standard action or a move action you may not use the powers listed under the original full discipline as they have been exhausted.
If you spend an AP you may chose to activate a new Full Discipline
This is the only time in the middle of a round when you can change your Full Discipline If you chose to activate an encounter full discipline then the power is exhausted at the end of the round even if you just used the move
Malcolm that is an excellent way of writing the powers

I can really see it as a psionic class but then again to me monks have always had a psionic feel to them (your fist are as damaging as a longsword, that cant be natural) and from what I am seeing they are doing a great job of it giving them some telekinetic reach and telekinetic move abilities.
Thank you :D
yeah, the psionic "feel" to the class doesn't quite fit; but if it's the only place to put them without creating the ki power source, it will do.

I whole-heartely disagree with their logic that it's to other psionics classes as the warlock is to the wizard. More like druid to wizard, imho. But, as with any of us, I haven't seen the others, I'm just going off their explanation in the other article. back on topic...

Okay, so it seems a balancing factor of all these cool psuedo-utility powers the monk gets is they get no level 22 utilities. Assuming this is a typo I look forward to seeing what those should be in the compiled issue.

**EDIT** Coolest monk power ever. The setup:

A king sits at the back of his 235-man deep army, issuing orders to generals so they can lead their soldiers. The monk on the opposing army's battlements sees the king's banner and jumps down to the army (move action). He then proceeds to teleport through the army, finding gaps in the defenses and attacking soldiers as he goes (wandering comet strike level 25 daily) and ends that attack with an action point for Ring the Golden bell (monk daily 15) which lands him in front of the king before striking all of those around him, including the king, and stunning them at the least until the end of his next turn.
I love this class.

That said:

Major flaw: Enchanting fists is an incomplete solution. For one, you only get access to the required ritual at level 4, meaning no magic fists until then. For two, parties spend most of their career with magic items ABOVE their level, and you cannot enchant things above your level, leaving the monk potentially a few levels behind in their attack power until level 30. Further, because monk fists are not part of any other real category, they only have access to "Any Weapon" enchantments, making them quite limited compared to all other weapons. Finally, now that we have the concept of enchanting monk fists, they need to make a ruling on whether or not you can do this with other natural weapons and abilities.

Major funny: Focus Expertise is basically a patch for PHB2's flawed Weapon and Impliment Expertise feats, and are especially amusing because the build REQUIRES it. :P


--

More on Monk Magic Fun, Invisible Knife Flaming Heads: http://forums.gleemax.com/showthread.php?p=18545402

Among other quirkiness is the issue of how many enchantments a monk's Unarmed Strike can take? One for the whole body? One for each hand? One for each hand and foot and head? Can they use alchemy items in the usual fashion?

Also: I'd really like for them to be able to use those Claw items as monk weapons, and maybe Katars. Both seem very monkish to me.
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The monk's unarmed strike is part of a weapon set called "Monk Weapons".
Also the likely hood of new weapon enchantments for monks exists.
Also you can use other monk weapons rather than enchanting you're fist.

The fist is way better mechanically, but the enchantment bonus is likely to be lower than found weapons, except for the Transfer Enchantment ritual in the Adventurer's Vault. It is also a level 4 so you'll have to wait, but it can handle enchantments higher than you're level. It's also cheaper.
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Not happy with the article.

The wording for Full discipline needs re-working, its confusing (as others have stated already).

The class is fine, but doesn't feel psionic at all, though I should wait to see other psionic classes.

It could be martial if it weren't for some powers, it could easily be ki and it really doesn't make sense why it isn't.
Agree with what's been said above regarding full disciplines, and also agree that they need a ton of clarification in the finished product.

That said, I'm really liking the class right now. No doubt there will be folks that sneer at their somewhat lacklustre damage*. But they are just so versatile and interesting - I think they'll be a lot of fun to play. Also, the folks that were clamoring for the monk to be the martial controller will be really happy about this.

*I'm thinking that the strength based monk might be more damage heavy...but that's just a guess.
It could be martial if it weren't for some powers, it could easily be ki and it really doesn't make sense why it isn't.

I think the point of the other article was that while the monk could easily be ki, there wasn't much else to do with the power source - so monk would likely end up being the only Ki class.
Maybe, its not particularly well explained, I don't know if we can request an article, but i'd like one on the Ki Power source and what was planned for it and what's deffinately happening with it.

I can't believe they'd do something so lame as to make Ki the Asian power source exclusively. The article references Samurai, Ninja, Shugenja and Wu-Jen.

the later two are probably a better fit for Elemental and the former two are explained in the article.

It'd be nice if we could get an update as to what to expect in PHB 3 (and maybe even PHB 4?)
There is only one thing that bugs me about this playtest - the Paragon Path that grants Channel Divinity. I can see a lot of Barbarians MC'ing monk JUST for Righteous Rage of Tempus.

I can't believe they'd do something so lame as to make Ki the Asian power source exclusively. The article references Samurai, Ninja, Shugenja and Wu-Jen.

They're scrapping the Ki power source. They said that concepts like the Samurai will likely be options like feats and powers and paragon paths, that way you could be a Fighter, Paladin, Cleric or Warden and still be a Samurai.

Read the article all the way through before complaining.

Besides, they never told us what we would get in PHB3 except for the Monk and wilden. There was speculation that it would have Ki and Psionic classes but never anything confirmed (well, people thought Ki was confirmed with monk, but no we know there is no ki and that psionic is confirmed instead). why would they give us an 'update' on something they've never told us and that is just rumormill?

(Frankly, I wouldn't be suprised if they don't scrap the Elemental power source too, it overlaps so much with Arcane. I can still see the Shadow power source as viable.)
Maybe, its not particularly well explained, I don't know if we can request an article, but i'd like one on the Ki Power source and what was planned for it and what's deffinately happening with it.

The word the devs use to describe the Ki power source is "untenable." So as I see it, there will simply be no Ki power source. A bit more elaboration couldn't hurt, though. They go on to say that if they come up with a good mechanical model for samurai, for example, they'll run with it, but for now, it would probably be handled in the same way as the Gladiator articles.
The class is fine, but doesn't feel psionic at all

Depends how you think of it. I see a Monk who has focused their mind to such a degree that their bodies can do damage above and beyond what anyone else can without any tools required (no weapons or armor needed).

To me that class is a mind-related class. And for me mind-classes = psionic classes.
Ki issues aside...

The Full Discipline thing is confusing me like crazy and this thread has only made it worse, hehe. No offense to anyone but when I see so many confused and a couple different interpretations then the writing needs some work.

All in all, I am glad the Monk is coming back into the fold. And it is not too late to fix the Ki/Psionic mistake.
Things I liked: +3 1d8 Reach 1 unarmed strike.

The fact its a dual wielding class while it is not a dedicated dual wielder (Two unarmed strikes, a dagger/unarmed depending on the setup).

The way the weapon and implement powers key off the same thing.

Things I don't like:
The low AC, the fact that the small boost to AC is also the most restricted boost in the game. Even Avengers who are suppose to strikers in cloth as well, get a +3 in all light armor.

The extra damage: Its a weakened verision of the sorcerer add on, the sorcerer add on only being comparable to the others when used on large groups.


Things I have mixed feelings about:
Full Discpline: Monks have become the go to class for half-elves if only for the ability to make their dillentate at once a attack or utility encounter power.

Focused Expertise: Mostly as it leaves the paladin, avenger, cleric, shaman out in the cold and still spending two feats to get expertise on all their potential attacks.
For anybody worried about unarmed strike as part of a treasure parcel, simply use the "Item levels as Treasure" Guidelines in Adventurer's Vault pg 197
Still not sure I get the Full Dicipline powers, but I'll read through them again.

All in all, this looks pretty cool.


Major flaw: Enchanting fists is an incomplete solution. For one, you only get access to the required ritual at level 4, meaning no magic fists until then. For two, parties spend most of their career with magic items ABOVE their level, and you cannot enchant things above your level, leaving the monk potentially a few levels behind in their attack power until level 30. Further, because monk fists are not part of any other real category, they only have access to "Any Weapon" enchantments, making them quite limited compared to all other weapons. Finally, now that we have the concept of enchanting monk fists, they need to make a ruling on whether or not you can do this with other natural weapons and abilities.

There have been several complaints about this, so how about this idea:
Monks may use the Create Magic Item ritual as a class feature, with some minor changes.
They can make items of their level + 1, and they can use any enchantment that could be put on a dagger or light blade.
Alternately, just make a bunch of "monk only" enchantments that are powerful for their level, to compensate for the "your level + 1" problem.

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The word the devs use to describe the Ki power source is "untenable." So as I see it, there will simply be no Ki power source. A bit more elaboration couldn't hurt, though. They go on to say that if they come up with a good mechanical model for samurai, for example, they'll run with it, but for now, it would probably be handled in the same way as the Gladiator articles.

They explain why its "untenable" or unjustifiable, but they don't explain what's actually happening with Ki.

Also, dumping Ki altogether is just strange. They give good reasons why archetypes like Ninja, Samurai, Wujen and Shugenja aren't Ki, but say nothing about the Source and what it could be.

As it stands, getting rid of Ki as a power source seems ill justified, untenable even.
For enchantments Monks just need access to the Transfer Enchantment ritual at level 1 for no cost, and it can only transfer an item to their fists. I'd then recommend removing the part about allowing the Enchant ritual on fists, since the monk could just Transfer an item after it was created. This way the monk never needs to be present for an Enchant, and it keeps all the flavor on his end.

I'd like to see the fighting styles add different weapon types to the monk's fist. An example would be a style that adds brutal 1 to fists, making their fists count as axes for feat and enchant purposes.


The wisdom build does seem to be the more controller version, which comes across as a very odd choice for a striker preview. It makes it harder to compare to the other strikers, so I'm still not sure how I feel about monk damage from their Flurry of Blows feature.

From the design article it does seem like all Flurry of Blows will have the ability to target a different enemy for the damage and have bonus effects on the extra enemy. The playtest version has a very controller feel to the feature, so we're still left guessing about a more strikerish version, but I would like to see more damage scaling against the main target.
Well the one thing I thought as I looked at the different powers for the monk was that this class does not look much like a striker. To me it looks to be more of a controller.

Particular examples of this are all of the added effects to the powers(not talking about the movements from the full disciplines because those make sense). The push and knocking prone of the at will powers, the slide from the flurry of blows, making an enemy make an attack against one of its allies, more sliding...etc.

These effects strike me as being more controller-y then striker-y.
Flurry of Blows is supposed to be their "striker damage output" class feature. We've seen two types of striker damage class features:

A) Once per round, +1d6 damage per tier
B) +Secondary Stat Mod to all damage

Why is the monk the worst of both? +Secondary Stat Mod, once per round.

Also, on Full Discipline powers, here's how it works: Each use of a Technique, either attack or move, counts as a use of the entire power. If the Full Discipline power is an At-Will, then you can use either of its techniques over and over. If it's an Encounter, then any use of either of its techniques expends the encounter power for that encounter.

For At-Will Full Discipline powers, you can use both the Move Technique and the Attack Technique of ONE Full Discipline power in one round. You'd be able to do the following actions in one round, in any order:

Minor, Technique Move, Technique Attack
Minor, Technique Move, Other Standard Action
Minor, Technique Move, Technique Move
Minor, Technique Move, Regular Move

Minor, Regular Move, Technique Attack
Minor, Regular Move, Other Standard Action
Minor, Regular Move, Regular Move

Minor, Minor, Technique Attack
Minor, Minor, Other Standard Action
Minor, Minor, Technique Move
Minor, Minor, Regular Move
Minor, Minor, Minor

If you action point, you can switch disicplines. So you can add any of the below listed actions to any of the combinations above:

Minor, Regular Move, Other Standard Action, Original Discipline Technique Attack, Original Discipline Technique Move, New Discipline Techique Attack, or New Discipline Technique Move

Encounter Disciplines may still only be used once per encounter. So if you use an Encounter Discipline Technique Move, you can't use the same Dicipline's Technique Attack, because you've already expended the use of that Technique. This limits your attack options to: Melee Basic Attack, Non-Full-Discipline Encounter Attack, Daily Discipline Attack, or Action Point for two At-Will Full-Discipline Technique Attacks, one At-Will Full-Discipline Technique Attack and it's Technique Move, A second Full-Discipline Encounter Attack's Attack Technique + Melee Basic Attack (or a second regular move action), or, if you really want, Action Point for a Melee Basic and regular/at-will/second encounter technique move.

Melee Training (Dexterity) will be an essential feat for Monks if you plan on using Encounter Move Techniques without siginificantly reduced attack power and resource consumption.

Also, if you think that's weak.... Monks are the ONLY class in the game so far that can spontaneously convert At-Will and Encounter attacks into utility powers (specifically, movement-focused utilities). That's nothing to sneeze at.
Planes Wanderer
Well the one thing I thought as I looked at the different powers for the monk was that this class does not look much like a striker. To me it looks to be more of a controller.

Particular examples of this are all of the added effects to the powers(not talking about the movements from the full disciplines because those make sense). The push and knocking prone of the at will powers, the slide from the flurry of blows, making an enemy make an attack against one of its allies, more sliding...etc.

These effects strike me as being more controller-y then striker-y.

The build they previewed in the playtest is more controller-centric, as explained in the Role area of the class traits. The Strength build will be more like your expected striker.

More targets = less damage to each. Also, in the other article, they mention that the other flurry of blows adds damage (probably much like sorcerer or TWF).
Encounter Disciplines may still only be used once per encounter. So if you use an Encounter Discipline Technique Move, you can't use the same Dicipline's Technique Attack, because you've already expended the use of that Technique. This limits your attack options to: Melee Basic Attack, or Action Point for two At-Will Discipline Technique Attacks, or just one and an exta move.

I did not read it that way. If you use an encounter Full Discipline, you can use either or both of its components - they point out that Full Disciplines are combinations of movement and attack, I suppose to model "fighting styles" after a fashion, and they also say you can use either or both of the components of a Full Discipline, at your discretion, if you have the actions to do so.

So I understood it to mean this:

Assume you have two encounter, full discipline powers: Power A, and Power B. Each of those has Attack and Move components; Attack A, Move A, etc.

If you decide to use Power A, you can use Attack A and Move A in the same turn, and you have therefore expended Power A for this encounter. That's the basic mode - these are just powers, and you use all parts of them.

If you needed to, you could then elect to spend an Action Point to throw down one more action, and with that action, you want to use Move B (from Power B). You have then also expended Power B, because you've used part of it, and don't have any actions left to use the rest.

So the use of an action point to pull in a component of another Full Discipline is an inefficient option - you "waste" part of that Full Discipline, because you've run out of actions to use both pieces. But you are allowed to use an Encounter FD Move and the same Encounter FD's Attack in one turn.


Edit: rereading your post, maybe we are saying the same thing. I can't tell. Apologies if so.
I'm not sure whether I understand full disciplines--are they like stances, where if I use my encounter full discipline, I can only use one of its powers once per round but it stays indefinitely... or is it just another power, but it has TWO options for what I do with it instead of just being an attack?

Basically as I am reading it, during the round, in which each player gets a turn, you can only use one power with the keyword Full Discipline, regardless if it's an interrupt or a free action. Thus if you used say, Dancing Cobra (at will) at your turn and did not spend an action point, you can not use another Full Discipline until the start of your next turn, regardless of opportunity attacks, interrupts, etc. You can, however, use any other power that fills the requirements that does not have the keyword Full Discipline. You can, however, use something that fulfills the prerequisites of the timing that does not include that keyword, such as Centered Flurry of Blows.

Also, both the attack and movement can only be used per discipline type. And once it's used, your movement returns to normal. So at wills are at will for both the attack and movement, an encounter discipline you get the attack and the move action and it's effect only once per encounter, and a daily discipline you get the attack and it's move action and effect only once per day.
Why is the monk the worst of both? +Secondary Stat Mod, once per round.

Notice that some of the weapon monk's powers (for example dancing cobra at-will1) target non-AC defenses.
This is also a striker feature...
An example of how to read the full discipline powers.

Drunken Monkey Monk Attack 1
Full Discipline
You gain the following encounter powers until the start of your next turn. You cannot use another full discipline this round unless you spend an action point to do so.

Attack Technique
Encounter * Implement, Psionic
Standard Action Melee touch
Target: One creature
Attack: Dexterity vs. Will
Hit: 1d6 + Dexterity modifier damage, and you slide
the target 1 square. The target then makes a melee
basic attack as a free action against an enemy of your
choice. The target gains a bonus to the attack roll
equal to your Wisdom modifier.

Movement Technique
Encounter
Move Action Personal
Effect: You move your speed + 2. During this
movement, you ignore difficult terrain and gain a
power bonus to all defenses against opportunity
attacks triggered by the movement. The power bonus
equals your Wisdom modifier.

copied from first page to help clear up the mounds of text people are creating over this. This is how it works put in the simplest of ways.