Overland Flight ritual shouldn't exist

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The lastest Dragon article, Ritually Speaking, contains the Overland Flight ritual which gives the entire party overland flight 20.

After flight was so heavily controlled in the PHB (and with good reason!) I'm wondering why they included this ritual. It completely circumvents all travel eight levels before True Portal does, and means that all epic characters can pretty much always fly and thus completely negate all groundbound encounters which don't happen indoors.

This is massively better than actual class powers, so I'm wondering why they thought it was a good idea.
Great article, in general.

Anyone know how wide of long the walls are in earthen ramparts?
The lastest Dragon article, Ritually Speaking, contains the Overland Flight ritual which gives the entire party overland flight 20.

After flight was so heavily controlled in the PHB (and with good reason!) I'm wondering why they included this ritual. It completely circumvents all travel eight levels before True Portal does, and means that all epic characters can pretty much always fly and thus completely negate all groundbound encounters which don't happen indoors.

This is massively better than actual class powers, so I'm wondering why they thought it was a good idea.

Ok I just spent 20 min writing a long post over why it isn't overpowered. However the board ate it, so I'm going to try for highlights instead.

-I can drive faster then this spell's flight speed(averages out to 10 mph) while I am in a school zone. They are hardly going to get all over the planet with this spell alone.
-Natural and unnatural obstacles can still stop them such as huricanes, magical cyclones, underdark, and oceans(which tend to be larger then 100 miles).
-Being attacked while using this flight spell==quick death
-Counter attacking while using this spell==quick and painful death
-The party still has to land every ten hours and stay there for half an hour, plenty of time for land encounters
-Griffons, which I believe have been stated to be paragon level appropriate mounts, would easily accomplish the exact same thing only with less dieing

And if we are comparing rituals(out of combat abilities) to powers(in combat abilities), I'm sure we could find lots of rituals that are better then powers, such as True Portal. However they also cost a lot to use, such as Overland Flight costing 5k a pop, which is only 2/25 of a 20th level magic item. However if you were to use it as your sole method of transportation, you would quickly be using up all of your cash on it. It is usefull for travelling in certain situations, where you otherwise can't get to your destination or if you need to get somewhere far away relatively quickly. However it is hardly a replacement for your legs when travelling.
It completely circumvents all travel eight levels before True Portal does, and means that all epic characters can pretty much always fly and thus completely negate all groundbound encounters which don't happen indoors.

I disagree with your first point.

First, it doesn't circumvent all travel prior to True Portal. True Portal is basically 3e Greater Teleport. It allows you to go anywhere on in the world so long as you know where you're going, and it gets you there, regardless of distance in at least 10 minutes, which is the time necessary to perform the ritual.

Overland Flight flight grants you the ability to cover, at most, 100 miles of distance in 10.5 hours. I say at most because, regardless of whether you pause in your travels to investigate something, do battle, or stop for a potty break, the duration clock is still running. 100 miles is far, but nowhere near as far as True Portal's infinite range. Further, Overland Flight grants you no guarantee that you'll reach you're destination. Nor does it grant protection from the weather, monsters, or sky pirates. What's more, Overland Flight is a tad expensive. 5000gp is not a sum you would want to have to regularly pay unless you're sure really need it. If you have access to a permanent teleportation circle, Overland Flight is even more expensive than True Portal per casting.

As for your second point, I can see your concern. Overland Flight would make it hard to pin down a epic level group, even if they can't fight back while flying. Fortunately, its optional material, so the DM doesn't have to allow the ritual or only allow the ritual in scroll form if he doesn't want to deal with flying PCs. Likewise, a DM can also use this against the players as well, which levels the playing field a bit.

I, however, am glad they brought back serious magical flight. It's one of the things I truly missed from 3e.
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Don't like it?




Don't allow it.
-I can drive faster then this spell's flight speed(averages out to 10 mph) while I am in a school zone. They are hardly going to get all over the planet with this spell alone.

Problem is they completely circumvent travel. Flying over the jungle really isn't as interesting as walking through it. Or I suppose, flying through the elemental chaos isn't as cool as navigating it on foot, as that's what you're doing at epic levels. Flying through hell isn't as cool as walking through it.

-Natural and unnatural obstacles can still stop them such as huricanes, magical cyclones, underdark, and oceans(which tend to be larger then 100 miles).

That's horribly cludgy, other than oceans, which is a good point.

-Being attacked while using this flight spell==quick death

Which means no one will ever be attacked while using it. *taps head*

-The party still has to land every ten hours and stay there for half an hour, plenty of time for land encounters

Problem is that they can completely circumvent land-bound encounters for ten hours - just fly over them. THIS is the real issue with it, even more so than travel.

And if we are comparing rituals(out of combat abilities) to powers(in combat abilities), I'm sure we could find lots of rituals that are better then powers, such as True Portal.

At level 20, people are still getting where they need to go. They're still adventurers. At level 28, when you get True Portal, typically speaking most groups aren't still really adventurers. They don't go on adventures. By this point typically you're going to where you need to go and travel is just a distraction. But before the upper end of epic, travel is meat.

The upshot of overland flight is that people simply cannot explore the astral sea and the elemental chaos without a fly speed of 20, as every epic level party will have this power. It also means that anything without a fly speed which doesn't dwell inside is completely worthless versus such a party, as they can simply fly over it and ignore it.

Don't like it?




Don't allow it.

I shouldn't have to not allow it, and more to the point, everything in Dragon is usable in the RPGA.
Flying over the jungle really isn't as interesting as walking through it.

I disagree. But this disagreement is based entirely on opinion, as I find being able to explore places while airborne very interesting indeed.

Problem is that they can completely circumvent land-bound encounters for ten hours - just fly over them. THIS is the real issue with it, even more so than travel.

Then give skybound encounters a shot. Or put the action at the destination rather than on the road.

Which means no one will ever be attacked while using it. *taps head*

I think it means the opposite. If a player is going to use Overland Flight, he should accept the risk that he is making himself vulnerable to attack and make the necessary preparations (or at least not fly too high). This is even more true if he has made any enemies by that level who know of his access to flight. To think otherwise, that the DM won't throw such an encounter because it would quickly kill him, would be metagaming and that PC would deserve a gravity-induced grave next to his equally unprepared brothers Scalesa'Mountain, Sailsin'Plate, Foughta'Dragon, Flip'thelich, and Didinchek'Fortraps.

I shouldn't have to not allow it, and more to the point, everything in Dragon is usable in the RPGA.

At least as far as non-RPGA games are concerned, you don't "have to not allow it" if that's too much effort. You could instead continue to play the game the way you have been playing prior to reading the article or simply pay that section of the article no mind at all. You don't even need to spend the calorie to handwave it away.

I think that's why they didn't put rituals like Overland Flight in the PH and instead release it separately. PCs having access to flight doesn't fit everyone's playstyles. Some like that it allows PCs to bypass stuff and ingore, engage in, and/or have an advantage in certain types of encounters, other hate those aspects. But since it's not core, you are free(er) to ignore it or not at your discretion.
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I shouldn't have to not allow it, and more to the point, everything in Dragon is usable in the RPGA.

EXCEPT for Magic Items and Rituals.

So, unless they give this out as a part of a treasure parcel (thereby granting access) it's no worry for the RPGA.
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Well, Cloud Chariot worries me much, much more, despite being a power.

Cheers, LT.
Well, Cloud Chariot worries me much, much more, despite being a power.

I'm not as worried about that or airships because they don't allow you to suddenly avoid a combat.
Problem is they completely circumvent travel. Flying over the jungle really isn't as interesting as walking through it. Or I suppose, flying through the elemental chaos isn't as cool as navigating it on foot, as that's what you're doing at epic levels. Flying through hell isn't as cool as walking through it.

I always thought that if you still having to travel on foot at epic levels, something somewhere went terribly wrong.
Problem is that they can completely circumvent land-bound encounters for ten hours - just fly over them. THIS is the real issue with it, even more so than travel.

They're epic level, that's one of the points
I shouldn't have to not allow it, and more to the point, everything in Dragon is usable in the RPGA.

And other people could complain about the exact opposite that they shouldn't have to houserule such a thing in
EXCEPT for Magic Items and Rituals.

So, unless they give this out as a part of a treasure parcel (thereby granting access) it's no worry for the RPGA.

A player could always grant himself the access to this ritual through one of his 15 "grant-yourself-any-access-slots"
The players in my group will be very happy to see the Overland Flight ritual (and several of the others). It won't cause any problems at all in our adventure planning or execution.
Perhaps I'm missing something, but how exactly is this better than a griffon mount or an airship? Aside from the extra 5 overland speed, the ritual is purely worse. Once combat begins and you begin tracking initiative you lose overland speed, so you either immediately descend or crash, based on how leniant your DM is, I think I'd allow my players to land, assuming they're not too far away from solid land. Whereas a flying mount keeps a tactical fly speed. Call me crazy, but 25 miles/day is not worth being left grounded against an epic flying opponent.
If you really need the players to go through a forest, set it up, a thunderstorm would be my DM fiat of choice.
I'm not as worried about that or airships because they don't allow you to suddenly avoid a combat.

The quote function didn't include the subquote referring to the Cloud Chariot ability that TD refers to as 'that'. That opinion is just nonsensical. You don't 'suddenly' avoid anything with a ritual, with casting times being what they are.
I support the "its epic levels" argument. Its a nice way to stop derailing and random encounters at high levels. At this level we are talking about demi-gods and archmages. Do we really wnat them going through a forrest beeing attacked by random stuff?

I would prefer to get safely and conveniently to the Dungeon of Absolute Danger, and start the actual adventure there (at that level mind you).

Magic Rafiq Control Deck [EDH][1vs1][multiplayer] [] Inferno Beatdown [EDH][multiplayer][1vs1][] Gwendlyn Combo/Control Deck [EDH][1vs1][] Merieke Casual Deck [EDH][multiplayer][] Roleplaying Magician class [D&D 3.5]

Which means no one will ever be attacked while using it. *taps head*

Lolwut?
I shouldn't have to not allow it, and more to the point, everything in Dragon is usable in the RPGA.

THIS coming from the guy whose solution to everything missing with 4e is "OMG HOUSERULE IT"?
To be fair, the argument that nobody will ever be attacked while using it is a possibility. An unimaginative DM, when seeing the ritual in play, will think of two scenarios...

1. Uneventful: Standard effect, supposedly ruining his lovely Dire Bear random encounters.
2. Kill the Party: When the party is incapable of defending itself while flying (having only a move action which must be used to stay aloft), this is a distinct possibility.

Because one will end the game, the other is used.

Depending on whether you can end the spell prematurely (it doesn't say crashing terminates it), this could be something all DM/players must deal with. That would make or break the ritual and lend credence to the argument that the ritual shouldn't exist...but for real reasons, rather than TD's.
To be fair, the argument that nobody will ever be attacked while using it is a possibility. An unimaginative DM, when seeing the ritual in play, will think of two scenarios...

1. Uneventful: Standard effect, supposedly ruining his lovely Dire Bear random encounters.
2. Kill the Party: When the party is incapable of defending itself while flying (having only a move action which must be used to stay aloft), this is a distinct possibility.

Because one will end the game, the other is used.

I don't like it because sometimes the 2nd choice is going to be something that actually makes sense given the circumstances. if you've got something flying, like a dragon, it's going to intercept the party if it sees them in the air, and then what? TPK?

I'm not really a fan of TPKing the group because they made one error in judgment. Sometimes the PCs are tired and they may not be thinking about the situation completely, and having a minor error turn TPK like using overland flight in the wrong spot really sucks. That's poor game design for an RPG.

The ritual is very poorly written and I would recommend to people not to use it in their games.
The quote function didn't include the subquote referring to the Cloud Chariot ability that TD refers to as 'that'. That opinion is just nonsensical. You don't 'suddenly' avoid anything with a ritual, with casting times being what they are.

You simply cast the ritual preemptively. It lasts for ten hours; you can take off at any time during that time.

THIS coming from the guy whose solution to everything missing with 4e is "OMG HOUSERULE IT"?

Um, what?

I don't like it because sometimes the 2nd choice is going to be something that actually makes sense given the circumstances. if you've got something flying, like a dragon, it's going to intercept the party if it sees them in the air, and then what? TPK?

I'm not really a fan of TPKing the group because they made one error in judgment. Sometimes the PCs are tired and they may not be thinking about the situation completely, and having a minor error turn TPK like using overland flight in the wrong spot really sucks. That's poor game design for an RPG.

This is exactly the problem. TPKing the party because they thought it'd be a good idea to fly up to the dragon's roost is lame, but letting them circumvent the climb up the mountain/through the tunnels/what have you via the ritual without consequence and after you warned them that there was a dragon up there is equally lame. You can't let them fight in the air, so basically you're stuck.

This is why the airship or gryphon mount is not so bad - the dragon can take them out without TPKing the party for doing something stupid. Overland flight doesn't give me outs.

And having to throw a thunderstorm up to make someone walk to the top of the floating island in the center of the elemental chaos is kind of lame. Giving someone powers and then making them worthless is worse than not giving them the power at all.
Snip

I shouldn't have to take out the rulebooks quotes to explain such basic stuff to people. Especially since the exact quote is in the ritual desciption. But, because people need to have their hands held:

MM, pg. 281:
"Overland flight is meant to be outside of combat ... It flies the specified number of squares in a single move action."

So, in the above example, yes, they can fly up the dragon's roost, and no, they couldn't fight the dragon in the air. So, hence, they probably shouldn't use the ritual to fly up the dragon. This is how you should handle the aforementioned problem:
DM: "You come to the big scary mountain where the nasty dragon that's been harassing the kindom lives. You can see the dragon's roost from the bottom of the mountain and there is a cave in front of you."
Players: "We fly up to the roost."
DM: "You can't."
Players: "Why not?"
DM: "Because you can't fight in the air and the dragon will attack you if you fly up to it, at which point you will fall 800 feet back down to the base of the mountain and die."
Players: "Oh, in that case, we'll take the cave." (If this is not the response from your players, or they don't come up with something much more clever, you probably have much deeper problems with your party.)
but letting them circumvent the climb up the mountain/through the tunnels/what have you via the ritual without consequence and after you warned them that there was a dragon up there is equally lame.

I couldn't disagree more. At this point we're talking about demigods and archmages. I can't think of anything more lame than a demigod having to climg the mountain using robes and pitons like ordinary mountaineer.

I even think there should be annother slightly higher level version that allows them to fight during the flight
Isn't a sensible party just likely to fly only 20 squares off the ground, so that if they are attacked (or even see a threat approaching) while using this ritual they just land with their next move action? I can't see why it has to be a TPK (unless the whole party are some how hit with a power that stops you taking the move action, then you crash I suppose).

Can you move double speed descending like in 3rd Ed? If so 40 squares off the ground at max.

Still climbing higher than you move speed with any form of flight is asking for trouble in 4th Ed with any power that knocks you prone meaning you crash to the ground.
I guess I don't see the problem with epic level characters spending 5,000 gold to fly somewhere while they cant fight.
If this was Paragon or Heroic level I'd have a real problem with it, at Epic, not so much.
To summarize the thread: Having travel options is good. Especially at epic level.

The best part about all of this? It's not even an issue to people with a competent DM. If you really, really, really want the players to take the cave route, then have the dragon spot them as they start flying. He comes down and attacks them. The PCs get knocked down, fight for a little bit, and then the dragon retreats to his home in the mountains. If the PCs try the ritual again, the dragon attacks again. And then maybe some of the monsters in the caves hear the noises and come out to investigate. Or maybe the dragon is so tough that he backs the PCs into the caves.

But that's assuming that you want to force the PCs to use the caves or climb the mountain or whatever.
As I mentioned earlier, it depends on how/when you can turn it off. Does the spell end as soon as you touch the ground? Are you able to maintain your full action capability so long as you don't actually fly for that interval, or are you stuck for 10 hours being unable to do anything but crash and/or fly?
As I mentioned earlier, it depends on how/when you can turn it off. Does the spell end as soon as you touch the ground? Are you able to maintain your full action capability so long as you don't actually fly for that interval, or are you stuck for 10 hours being unable to do anything but crash and/or fly?

Yeah, not to mention that there's really no ruling as to what happens when a creature with an overland flight speed, but no tactical flight speed, enters combat.

Do you automatically start falling the moment initiative is rolled? Do you glide to the ground? If so, then how fast?

I haven't seen that stuff addressed anywhere.
Wait, you mean that the rulings are incomplete?!?
I don't like it because sometimes the 2nd choice is going to be something that actually makes sense given the circumstances. if you've got something flying, like a dragon, it's going to intercept the party if it sees them in the air, and then what? TPK?

Winged Boots.

Anybody who plans on flying at lethal altitudes, whether it be with Overland Flight, a flying mountain, an airship, or even an encounter power, should either have a pair of these or take similar precautions. A TPK can also be proactively stopped by the party by simply not flying that high.

And in the case of being intercepted by a dragon, fleeing is still an option. You maintain flight as long as you don't take any other actions. So while a dragon can outpace a group of PCs in the air, the group should still have time enough to land and counter attack before taking too much damage, or any damage at all if the spot the dragon soon enough (especially if you just plummet and let your Winged Boots take care of the rest).

Also, as long as you are within 20 squares of the ground, you land safely (see Crashing and Safe Distance, pg 48). That's a 100ft safety net. Plenty high enough to fly effectively over most terrain without risking TPK at the same time.

This is exactly the problem. TPKing the party because they thought it'd be a good idea to fly up to the dragon's roost is lame, but letting them circumvent the climb up the mountain/through the tunnels/what have you via the ritual without consequence and after you warned them that there was a dragon up there is equally lame. You can't let them fight in the air, so basically you're stuck.

If I had a choice between using Overland Flight to reach a dragon's nest and climbing up the mountain, I'd rather do both: Fly over obstacles, dart between cover, up shear cliffs where I would be an appetizer on the wall. And for areas where flying would be risky or likely reveal my location to the dragon, I'll just walk it. I don't see why it has to be an either/or situation.

Then again, I'd rather avoid dragons if at all possible regardless of what movement modes are available. Dragons are hazardous to your health.

This is why the airship or gryphon mount is not so bad - the dragon can take them out without TPKing the party for doing something stupid. Overland flight doesn't give me outs.

You mean take out the griffon or airship? If so, I'm not sure how plummeting to one's death is better than plummeting to one's death.

Yeah, not to mention that there's really no ruling as to what happens when a creature with an overland flight speed, but no tactical flight speed, enters combat.

Do you automatically start falling the moment initiative is rolled? Do you glide to the ground? If so, then how fast?

I haven't seen that stuff addressed anywhere.

I could be wrong, but I don't think anything happens to your overland flight speed when you enter combat, nor have I seen any rule that sets such a precedence. It would be like losing your walking speed because you entered combat. The only restriction I've seen is that you can use any other actions except a single move action.
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I'm confused--is TD actually arguing that killing the fighter's griffon mount won't result in the fighter falling hundreds of feet to his painful demise?
MM, pg. 281:
"Overland flight is meant to be outside of combat ... It flies the specified number of squares in a single move action."

You do realize that doesn't prevent you from using it IN combat, right? No?

It doesn't. You can use overland flight speed in combat. It sucks, but you can do it.

Basic stuff indeed. Please understand the rules before you insult me.

So, in the above example, yes, they can fly up the dragon's roost, and no, they couldn't fight the dragon in the air. So, hence, they probably shouldn't use the ritual to fly up the dragon.

That doesn't mean they won't. People are stupid, and they'll do the obvious thing quite often.

You mean take out the griffon or airship? If so, I'm not sure how plummeting to one's death is better than plummeting to one's death.

I think you're missing an obvious fact:

You can kill their means of flight without killing them.
So...knocking people out of the air means killing them while blowing up a zeppelin means not killing them.

Furthermore, just for the lulz:
You can kill their means of flight without killing them.

You're saying that you should waste their hard-earned resources by KILLING their mounts instead of just wounding them? What kind of DM are you? I thought we weeded out all those "DM vs. players" people in 3.5!
You do realize that doesn't prevent you from using it IN combat, right? No?

Yes, it does. We'll try this again:

"You fly the specified amount of squares in a single move action. If you take actions to do anything else, you crash."

Please, read over that until you understand why this can't be used in combat. I'll wait. I've even bolded the relevant parts. Got it yet? Do you realize why as soon as you take another action, you crash. Overland movement cannot be used tactically. Not it's really bad to do so, it can't be done. You use overland flight for long-distance travel. All of that travel is done in one action. Upon taking another action, you crash. You can't bypass the fight by flying around it, as that would require the use of another action, at which point you would crash. Unless the party was somehow omnicienct enough to know where the fight would be before they left. Now do you see why this can't be used in combat?
You're saying that you should waste their hard-earned resources by KILLING their mounts instead of just wounding them? What kind of DM are you? I thought we weeded out all those "DM vs. players" people in 3.5!

Absolutely. You can always give them more treasure or what have you so they can get it back.

"You fly the specified amount of squares in a single move action. If you take actions to do anything else, you crash."

You aren't thinking about it creatively. Why is this useful?

Well, first off, you can simply fly away during the middle of combat versus a ground bound foe. He can't really do anything about it. You fly away, out of his range, and he's screwed. He can't follow you.

Second, you can use it to fly up on top of something and rain down death. So if you're near a wall or a house, for instance, you fly up there and shoot down from there. You are already on the ground, so are fine.

Seriously, its useful in combat, especially for avoiding it entirely, but also in other ways.

It completely negates anything without the ability to fly in a room with a ceiling higher than its reach.
That doesn't mean they won't. People are stupid, and they'll do the obvious thing quite often.

Lack of forethought has claimed countless adventurers past and will claim countless adventurers in the future. I don't think you can blame the tools if their user uses them in an unsafe manner and/or in a way that they were not intended to be used.

I think you're missing an obvious fact:

You can kill their means of flight without killing them.

No, I understand that much. I'm just not seeing how taking out a character's non-ritual means of flight is any better than taking out their ritual means of flight. You say that Overland Flight doesn't give you an out because a dragon attack against them would be a TPK. For this to be true, the conditions that the PCs are flying in would have to such that suddenly losing the ability to fly would be deadly. However, if that's true, then suddenly losing the ability to fly, reguardless of means, would be deadly, as your means of flight does not affect falling damage.

Even if a dragon focused solely on attacking your mount or airship, losing your transport at, say, 500ft, is no better than losing your overland flight speed at 500ft. And depending on exactly what kind of vehicle or mount you employ, there's a chance that attacking their transport would be easier than attacking the PC, such as if the PCs used lower leveled mounts or if the dragon attacks from below an airship while using it as cover.
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I'm trying to decide whether to laugh hysterically or sob hysterically.

You are complaining that players might GET ON A ROOF or a WALL and attack their enemies?
No, I understand that much. I'm just not seeing how taking out a character's non-ritual means of flight is any better than taking out their ritual means of flight. You say that Overland Flight doesn't give you an out because a dragon attack against them would be a TPK.

The problem is that the only way to stop them from flying in is to attack them directly. This is what you're not getting, I guess.

With the gryphon or airship, you can destroy the gryphon or airship. But if they're just using a ritual, then you have to actively kill them to stop them from flying.
TD, are you intentionally ignoring all of the other aspects that prove your point wrong?

So your players, being incapable of fighting back while flying, decide to refuse to land and rather die after a nice long while of being stabbed? Do your players respond to attacks that knock them prone (and thus having face meet dirt) by flying back up (same tactic on flying mounts too)?

What about actually wondering how the spell works? I've twice now brought up the vagueness as to when the spell can end (this makes it a third time)? If you go by its wording, where you're virtually paralyzed for 10 hours without recourse, then it's a deathtrap of a spell and needs to be altered/removed for entirely different reasons than what you're arguing about.
TD, are you intentionally ignoring all of the other aspects that prove your point wrong?

So your players, being incapable of fighting back while flying, decide to refuse to land and rather die after a nice long while of being stabbed? Do your players respond to attacks that knock them prone (and thus having face meet dirt) by flying back up (same tactic on flying mounts too)?

Okay, let's look at two situations:

1) You are on top of something which flies.
2) You fly.

You get in a fight in midair.

In case 1, your foe can end your ability to fly by killing what you are on top of. NOT YOU.

In case 2, this is not an option.

What is so difficult for you to understand about this?
Does the spell end when you want it to, allowing you to act, or does the paralysis only last while you're airborne?

If it's the former, then you have abysmally stupid players, and you're just whining.

If it's the latter, then you're apparently complaining that you can't take their toys. Do you hate the fact that players can't be disarmed of their weapons without being killed? The party can't defend themselves unless they land anyway, and being able to attack from a roof or a wall is something you can do back at 1st level, especially if the climber carries a rope or ladder around. If you're able to fly to various places outside their reach whenever they try to come at you, then this is a mobility issue on the part of the monster.

If it's neither, then the rules need to be clarified before anyone complains about it properly.

What of Cloud Chariot? You know, that gold free ability that lasts all day, cannot be destroyed, allows the party to attack while airborne, grants cover, isn't a mount and thus cannot be knocked prone to force a crash...and you complain about Overland Flight?

What's the hard part? Do I need to use smaller words?
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