Mavet Rav Setting

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Very innovative. I especially liked all the Hebrew language references embedded in the article, beginning of course with the city's name. "Gibor Godol" (trans. "very brave" or "great bravery") most certainly is!

I'll leave it to my fellow readers to point out the other Easter Eggs...
They've all been covered in the other Mavet Rav thread. . . 7 posts down from this one.

http://forums.gleemax.com/showthread.php?t=1018527
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Just the same ('cause who cares how many positive threads there are about a good article) I totally agree.

It was a great article.

I've been impressed by some of the recent articles blending culture/intellectualism with D&D.

This one was a major case as was the recent Zeitgeist article.


So much for the "dumbing down" in 4E eh?
I've been impressed by some of the recent articles blending culture/intellectualism with D&D.

This one was a major case as was the recent Zeitgeist article.


So much for the "dumbing down" in 4E eh?

Well, unfortunately the Zeitgeist article made me feel positively stoopid. I really enjoy Hal Maclean's work but I hope 4e doesn't take things this far ;).

I enjoyed the Mavet Rav article and agree with the others, excellent article. Not so much brain strain, this one, although (like Zeitgeist) it does seem a bit more cerebral than most :D.
/\ Art
Wasn't a big fan of the Zeitgiest article, either. This, I liked... but does anyone know why the other thread is now blank/inaccessible?
One more translation, since the other thread never fully addressed it:

Mavet Rav. Mavet = death. Rav has several connotations. It can mean many, great, vast, or mighty. "Mighty Death," "Great Death," et. al. certainly fit. It can also mean "teacher," however, which offers a double-meaning of its own. Is "Mavet Rav" teacher of death (that is, teaching others the way of death), or death's teacher (i.e. teachers of death itself)? You could create factions on the basis of that semantic question alone.

For added fun, insert an apostrophe to make it Mavet Ra'av, and you've added a word with a clear meaning: hunger. Death's hunger, or hunger for death?

Both, as it happens; and you can use this one, too. Lt. Gen. Yodekh Kola of the Crypt will have agents for his personal schemes who are mostly incorporeal undead and speak in dry whispers. Extend the saying of the city name even slightly while speaking this way, and "Mavet Rav" sounds like "Maaavehhht Rahhhh-aaaahhhv".

Do it right, and your players may not even notice - at first. Encounters with other incorporeal undead who pronounce the city name in the same tones, but properly, may eventually lead PCs to wonder if there's more to this. There is indeed more to it, and that change has a deeper meaning.
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