D&D Insider

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Of course its inferior. Have you not see the various 3rd party character generators over the years? They make statting up a character (especially high level ones) easy.

And none of them have been wholly suitable to all my character creation needs. Pencil and Paper has never failed me, however.
At least I have my proper avatar now, I guess. But man is this cloud dark.
And none of them have been wholly suitable to all my character creation needs. Pencil and Paper has never failed me, however.

The best programs are typically ones people make for themselves (and never share it). And you don't have to completely rely on a program. You can have it do all the heavy lifting, then account for the minutia it wasn't designed for.
I'm a little confused about this myself. When I attempt to login with my forum account, it says "Welcome Guest".

I'm not sure the 'tools' are functional yet (at least I can't find them). Perhaps someone will come along and clear this up.

(Originally Posted by gralamin)
You are not going to find the tools yet. The tools will not be coming out before the rule set is finished.

Why can't people understand?

>>I do understand now. Thank you.

I just find it find it curious that they said during the GenCon presentation (and I'm paraphrasing from memory) that Insider would "go live in full preview mode" right after the announcement presentation, yet apparently "free preview mode" means (at the moment) "seeing exactly what you can see on the D&D website without logging in to Insider."


I understand the tools aren't up, and new Dragon and Dungeon content won't arrive until October (if I recall correctly)... but then what is the point of activating a "free preview mode" if you have nothing to preview as of yet?


Don't get me wrong, I will still be checking the site almost daily to see what new stuff is made available.

It's just kind of funny that:

(A) so many people attempted to log on to the site following the announcement that it led to a server crash of at least 12 hours in length; and

(B) once the server was brought back online the amount of exclusive "free preview" content people could log on to see turned out to be absolutely zero.


So you mean we dropped the site's HP to below zero (but higher than -10) with nothing to show for it?

ideoultracounterquasicryptopropseudocontraneoantidisestablishmentarianisticalismesque reminiscent of the idea of the highest degree of being against something that is almost but not quite secretly in favor of pretended or spurious opposition to the revival or modification of a movement characterized by relation to the movement or ideology that opposes the ending of the status of an group of individuals regarded as an entity as granted by enacted legislation
So you mean we dropped the site's HP to below zero (but higher than -10) with nothing to show for it?

Oh, no, I'm pretty sure it was killed outright. Heck, might've even failed its save for massive damage. The downtime was spent finding a cleric capable of casting True Resurrection on it.
Tales from the Rusty Dragon (http://rustydragon.blogspot.com) - A 4th Edition Conversion Project Covering Paizo's Rise of the Runelords Adventure Path
The best programs are typically ones people make for themselves (and never share it).

Yetiware is pointless.

So you mean we dropped the site's HP to below zero (but higher than -10) with nothing to show for it?

Well, you see, there were so many people attacking it that the Encounter Level was insufficient to provide XP.
At least I have my proper avatar now, I guess. But man is this cloud dark.
Are writers and designers going to have to intentionally leave things out of their books in order to save some for the website? This is what worries me. Things probably get cut from books to save space all the time, right? Are the things on the website just going to be the scraps, or will they be fully developed chapters in their own right? If it's the former, why are we paying for it? If it's the latter, I feel kinda upset that I'm not getting a "full" book.

I suppose the extra content is going to be just that: extra and optional. To me, though, that seems really hit-or-miss. If it's bad I will feel ripped off with the subscription and if it's good I'll feel like I was ripped off on the original book sale. Wow, that sounds a lot like I am just adverse to subscriptions, but, I assure you, I am not. I just don't really know what I'd be getting, and I really don't like the idea of the good sections of a book being "saved" for the online content.

I guess the idea of the online play, the character whatever-er, and the Dungeon & Dragon articles makes the subscription fee "legit", but additional content for a book does not rock.
The Dragon articles; Ampersand, Design & Development, and Playtest Reports are the first elements of the D&D Insider part of the website and require you to sign-in to view them. However because the volume of traffic to our site is quite high we have temporarily enabled a single "Guest" sign-in to help decrease the load on the servers. We will fully activate the login feature when the server load normalizes sometime this coming week.

Sorry for any invonvience.

--MJ
So, someone from staff could answer this: there will be any playtesters outside USA?
Now there can actually be a use for the table screen/computer that Microsoft was showing off. Everyone could sit around the table and use the Insider at the same time. Of course the home you would be playing in would need to be WiFi capable, or have a house nearby that didn't protect their WiFi. Or that game table that has been floating around the web for a while would just need a minor upgrade.
One thing I can tell you, right now, tonight, is how the game is functioning at my Thursday night table. We're getting around the table faster than we did when this was a 3.5 game. We're hitting rules hitches at more or less the same rate as in 3.5--but this is playtesting, where the only alternative to finding problems is, well, not finding problems. I gotta believe those will fade away as we polish things up. And as the DM, the "information processing" load (bookkeeping, lookups, resource management) on me is way, way down. This does wonders for my ability to DM because I can focus more brainpower on making the encounter come to life.

My players--a mix of other game designers and friends from outside the game industry--are having a good time. (But the point is that we're friends, so the rules can't really take credit for that.) My players have some issues with the game still, and I'm madly taking playtest notes as we play.

In a word: Scary.

That's not playtesting; that's playing. There's a big difference. Sitting around playing a regular campaign and hoping you find glitches while doing so is all fine and dandy, but I would have hoped you guys were doing more than that. Of course, given snippets over the years, I'm not entirely surprised that this sort of activity counts as "playtesting".

Hopefully, when you guys start picking playtesters from the general gamer population, you'll get some people that are willing/able/eager to bend the rules, twist the rules, shake the rules, stretch the rules, abuse the rules, smash the rules and in general push them as far as possible in an attempt to break them. (Unless all those bits of information over the years just coincidentally happened to show that that sort of playtesting has never occured, when in fact it has.)

In addition, the value of the anonymous playtester has the possibility of providing more pointed and harsh criticism. Of course friends can point out what's wrong, but being friend, they're likely to show their manners and word it in a more friendly and polite way, which is sometimes easier to ignore, to they don't suddenly be an outsider that got the boot from the group.

I'm a little confused about this myself. When I attempt to login with my forum account, it says "Welcome Guest".

I'm not sure the 'tools' are functional yet (at least I can't find them). Perhaps someone will come along and clear this up.

That's what I get too, and the specific reason I read this thread. Hopefully, it's just a glitch...

The Dragon articles; Ampersand, Design & Development, and Playtest Reports are the first elements of the D&D Insider part of the website and require you to sign-in to view them. However because the volume of traffic to our site is quite high we have temporarily enabled a single "Guest" sign-in to help decrease the load on the servers. We will fully activate the login feature when the server load normalizes sometime this coming week.

Sorry for any invonvience.

Ok.

I guess that works for an explanation, though I can't imagine why that was such a secret that it couldn't have been put up as a message when someone signed in as Guest.
Yetiware is pointless.

That may be, but other wise you can quit strawmanning me. I make a suggestion, and you come along and make a childish, "it can only be this way or that way" dismissal. Apparently you're too good for the suggestion of boards members. You can take that egotistic attitude elsewhere.
Here is some more info for you guys.

http://forums.gleemax.com/showthread.php?t=908201
Here is some more info for you guys.

http://forums.gleemax.com/showthread.php?t=908201

Some great information in there. Now all I'd like to know is if I can back up my campaign specific information to my local machine, too. That would be enough to seal the deal.

And, as I suspected, it will be a client based approach.

I'm feeling more comfortable already.
Here is some more info for you guys.

http://forums.gleemax.com/showthread.php?t=908201

Thanks for the link Xmen510, he makes a convincing arguement for at least trying the service out (with all the doodads) before condeming it outright. I like the idea of being able to acces and print a character sheet from anywhere you can connect (if it's stored digitally on your account) and the only other thing I would want to know for sure is can I save the articles from Dragon/Dungeon locally to view when I am not connected (either real life gaming or to read at work where I have no connection but am allowed to bring my notebook)? I can understand wanting to keep the virtual books online to avoid rampant piracy (nothing's gonna stop them but at least it wont make it easy) but the magazine stuff I would like the option to save for later reading (.pdf or at least a plain text html version). Printing the article will be cost prohibitive for the average user (unless they're cheating and using the work printer).
IMAGE(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y239/SoulCatcher78/techdevil78.jpg)
Online DnD. I hope DnD will never become soley Online based. I, personally, enjoy seeing my friends.

And so do I.

D&D, for me, is mostly about face-to-face gaming.

But I have a lot of friends who are now scattered all around the world. I'd appreciate an opportunity to spend some time with them again...even if it's only over a computer 'kitchen table.'

Let's see how well their toy works. Who knows? It might be cool... ;)
"Reading, after a certain age, diverts the mind too much from its creative pursuits. Any man who reads too much and uses his own brain too little falls into lazy habits of thinking." "The important thing is not to stop questioning." A. Einstein
That may be, but other wise you can quit strawmanning me. I make a suggestion, and you come along and make a childish, "it can only be this way or that way" dismissal. Apparently you're too good for the suggestion of boards members. You can take that egotistic attitude elsewhere.

While my attitude in general may be egotistical, I'm pretty sure I haven't made any 'it can only be this way or that way' dismissals here. Perhaps you have me confused with another person who has been directing comments towards you. I have merely pointed out that there is precedent for certain alarmist reactions to the linking of the rules to PC use, and that Character Gen programs by nature inevitably lack the versatility to cope with all campaign needs (to which you responded that Yetiware - software that for the purposes of this discussion may as well not exist - is "the best").
At least I have my proper avatar now, I guess. But man is this cloud dark.
Yes, God forbid we have to pay for something valuable. People pay $10-20/month for WoW and every other MMO out there.

uhhm... this is DnD... not a MMO.

wow, and I thought I was thick.
Terms you should know...
Show
Kit Build - A class build that is self sustaining and has mechanical differences than the normal scale. Started in Essentials. Most are call their own terms, though the Base Class should be said in front of their own terms (Like Assassin/Executioner) Power Points - A mechanic that was wedged into the PHB3 classes (with the exception of the Monk) from the previous editions. This time, they are used to augment At Wills to be Encounters, thus eliminating the need to choose powers past 4th level. Mage Builds - Kit builds that are schools of magic for the Wizard. A call back to the previous editions powering up of the wizard. (Wizard/Necromancer, for example) Unlike the previous kit builds, Wizards simply lose their Scribe Rituals feature and most likely still can choose powers from any build, unlike the Kit Builds. Parcel System - A treasure distribution method that keeps adventurers poor while forcing/advising the DM to get wish lists from players. The version 2.0 rolls for treasure instead of making a list, and is incomplete because of the lack of clarity about magic item rarity.
ha ha
56902498 wrote:
They will Essentialize the Essentials classes, otherwise known as Essentials2. The new sub-sub-classes will be: * Magician. A subsubclass of Mage, the magician has two implements, wand and hat, one familiar (rabbit) and series of basic tricks. * Crook. A subsubclass of Thief, the Crook can only use a shiv, which allows him to use his only power... Shank. * Angry Vicar, a subsubclass of warpriest, the angry vicar has two attacks -- Shame and Lecture. * Hitter. A subsubclass of Slayer, the Hitter hits things. * Gatherer. A subsubclass of Hunter, it doesn't actually do anything, but pick up the stuff other players might leave behind. Future Essentials2 classes include the Security Guard (Sentinel2), the Hexknife (Hexblade2), the Webelos (Scout2), the Gallant (Cavalier2) and the Goofus (Knight2). These will all be detailed in the box set called Heroes of the Futile Marketing. (Though what they should really release tomorrow is the Essentialized version of the Witchalok!)
uhhm... this is DnD... not a MMO.

That's not the point. People pay $10-20 a month for Valuable X (in this case, a video game). It would not be unreasonable to pay $10 for Valuable Y (in this case, DDI).
That's not the point. People pay $10-20 a month for Valuable X (in this case, a video game). It would not be unreasonable to pay $10 for Valuable Y (in this case, DDI).

except for the fact that it isn't worth the same amount for the different services. One is a video game, the other is content and tools. I want to buy my digital tools, not lease it with no chance to own.
Terms you should know...
Show
Kit Build - A class build that is self sustaining and has mechanical differences than the normal scale. Started in Essentials. Most are call their own terms, though the Base Class should be said in front of their own terms (Like Assassin/Executioner) Power Points - A mechanic that was wedged into the PHB3 classes (with the exception of the Monk) from the previous editions. This time, they are used to augment At Wills to be Encounters, thus eliminating the need to choose powers past 4th level. Mage Builds - Kit builds that are schools of magic for the Wizard. A call back to the previous editions powering up of the wizard. (Wizard/Necromancer, for example) Unlike the previous kit builds, Wizards simply lose their Scribe Rituals feature and most likely still can choose powers from any build, unlike the Kit Builds. Parcel System - A treasure distribution method that keeps adventurers poor while forcing/advising the DM to get wish lists from players. The version 2.0 rolls for treasure instead of making a list, and is incomplete because of the lack of clarity about magic item rarity.
ha ha
56902498 wrote:
They will Essentialize the Essentials classes, otherwise known as Essentials2. The new sub-sub-classes will be: * Magician. A subsubclass of Mage, the magician has two implements, wand and hat, one familiar (rabbit) and series of basic tricks. * Crook. A subsubclass of Thief, the Crook can only use a shiv, which allows him to use his only power... Shank. * Angry Vicar, a subsubclass of warpriest, the angry vicar has two attacks -- Shame and Lecture. * Hitter. A subsubclass of Slayer, the Hitter hits things. * Gatherer. A subsubclass of Hunter, it doesn't actually do anything, but pick up the stuff other players might leave behind. Future Essentials2 classes include the Security Guard (Sentinel2), the Hexknife (Hexblade2), the Webelos (Scout2), the Gallant (Cavalier2) and the Goofus (Knight2). These will all be detailed in the box set called Heroes of the Futile Marketing. (Though what they should really release tomorrow is the Essentialized version of the Witchalok!)
except for the fact that it isn't worth the same amount for the different services.

Sure it is.
One is a video game, the other is content and tools.

No, one is a game, and the other one is a game.
I want to buy my digital tools, not lease it with no chance to own.

In the long run, this will work out better for you.

Assuming that each Dragon and Dungeon magazine runs you $3, and assuming that the expanded content runs you an extra $1 (and both of these estimates are probably low) in terms of worth, that leaves $2 left for the entire suite of digital tools per month. Assuming you use the tools for eight years, that's $192. That's about the same price as it would cost you to purchase these packages separately, and not counting the extra costs associated with continually purchasing expansions to the product as new books and supplements are released. You're getting a hell of a deal on this.
Tales from the Rusty Dragon (http://rustydragon.blogspot.com) - A 4th Edition Conversion Project Covering Paizo's Rise of the Runelords Adventure Path
Assuming that each Dragon and Dungeon magazine runs you $3, and assuming that the expanded content runs you an extra $1 (and both of these estimates are probably low) in terms of worth, that leaves $2 left for the entire suite of digital tools per month. Assuming you use the tools for eight years, that's $192. That's about the same price as it would cost you to purchase these packages separately, and not counting the extra costs associated with continually purchasing expansions to the product as new books and supplements are released. You're getting a hell of a deal on this.

This would be true except that to use the Dungeon or Dragon material at my gaming table I now have to print it out or buy a laptop. That cost (mostly ink) actually gets very steep very quickly.

- Ashavan
This would be true except that to use the Dungeon or Dragon material at my gaming table I now have to print it out or buy a laptop. That cost (mostly ink) actually gets very steep very quickly.

- Ashavan

As has been indicated elsewhere, the rules info to use the DDI material will/can be part of the character sheet printouts. IMHO, printing a character sheet is something that is just an expected part of the game.
As has been indicated elsewhere, the rules info to use the DDI material will/can be part of the character sheet printouts. IMHO, printing a character sheet is something that is just an expected part of the game.

Yeah, the only gripe I can understand you having here is for Dungeon adventures. Sure, printing those out might take ten pages or so, but that's an entire adventure, probably for two or three sessions. We're not talking some substantial cost, guys.
Tales from the Rusty Dragon (http://rustydragon.blogspot.com) - A 4th Edition Conversion Project Covering Paizo's Rise of the Runelords Adventure Path
Have you printed out high quality color print outs in quantity lately? Even in small quanities, they get expensive quickly.... that's why copy shops charge you a buck a page to print in color.

- Ashavan
In a word: Scary.

That's not playtesting; that's playing. There's a big difference. Sitting around playing a regular campaign and hoping you find glitches while doing so is all fine and dandy, but I would have hoped you guys were doing more than that. Of course, given snippets over the years, I'm not entirely surprised that this sort of activity counts as "playtesting".

Hopefully, when you guys start picking playtesters from the general gamer population, you'll get some people that are willing/able/eager to bend the rules, twist the rules, shake the rules, stretch the rules, abuse the rules, smash the rules and in general push them as far as possible in an attempt to break them. (Unless all those bits of information over the years just coincidentally happened to show that that sort of playtesting has never occured, when in fact it has.)

In short, get people who live to break games to playtest 4th Ed.

I support this wholeheartedly. I'm one of the local game-breakers in the Philippines, and I've subverted even games like Munchkin from their intended purpose ^_^

In addition, the value of the anonymous playtester has the possibility of providing more pointed and harsh criticism. Of course friends can point out what's wrong, but being friend, they're likely to show their manners and word it in a more friendly and polite way, which is sometimes easier to ignore, to they don't suddenly be an outsider that got the boot from the group.

Yep, i will also agree that it's hard to be critical when playtesting for a friend. I tend to "blunt" my comments a bit when I'm testing for people I know and like, albeit I also do it partly because I respect their vision of the game and want to preserve it as much as possible (even though I sometimes feel that the vision might be ultimately unprofitable).
In other words, let's hope that WotC is finally realizing that, although we really do enjoy sitting around a table in the basement ("Where are the CHEETOS?!"), we are actually in the 21st century.

With high-speed internet access rapidly becoming ubiquitous in the developed world, it

That's not true, actually... As of this June just barely over half of all U.S. households actually have broadband. What is encouraging however is that the bulk of subscription orders for Internet access (72% of all such orders) are for broadband... BUT there's a long way to go to being "ubiquitous" in the U.S. alone - much less other parts of the world - and just because they have broadband doesn't mean "high speed." I am on a "broadband" connection, but due to the offerings in my area I have to settle for a 0.5Mbps (synchronous) connection - which is faster than "narrow band" (aka: dial-up) connections - but it makes those "flash-driven" sites a pain in the *** and mostly unusable. To force a 3d or multi-media intensive site of services and goodies on every gamer would be a bad Bad BAD idea... A conservative site with awesome tools ANYONE online could use (and the option to completely NOT use them and not have to feel like you're missing something "essential" to the game or gaming experience) IS A MUST!
A comment I made on another thread that I think fits here. This is to all those who, for some reason, think D&DI is necessary to play 4E.

I have not read through everything but I have only one comment from what I have read.

I play D&D for the comraderie of getting together with friends and having fun. I like the RP and interaction over a table.

Adding an electronic component past just character creation to me is taking away from that.

If I want to roleplay with a computer involved I would play a MUD.

Then dont do it. It's an option, after all. Alot of people are complaing about the online options and what it's "taking away". The weird thing is: it's not taking away anything. It's only adding to what you can do now. You can still play the same game you've loved for years off-line!

If you're complaining that what you don't want is all packaged with stuff you do want, and you dont want to pay for an option you wont use, I understand. Make that your complaint, not the function itself.

All of D&D Insider is just an addition, and add-on to what you can already do. You can still go to the table and have your friends there in person. You can still buy the books and make characters and adventures and dungeons from them, and you can still do everything you can do now without D&DI. All D&DI does is add to the experience. It allows you to play with people you couldn't normally meet face to face, It allows you to whip up characters, NPCs, dungeons and more in minutes as opposed to hours, and tons of other things. But not one aspect of it is mandatory.

If you don't feel like paying whatever dollars a month, dont. That's why the payment is separate. If it was free, the cost of making those features would be paid by raising the book prices, and you wouldn't want that, would you? (I wouldn't, for sure).

If you think that in order to play D&D you'll need to buy a laptop, you dont. Again, D&D Insider is optional. Plus, the only things useful at the table itself are the character vault and the online books. and maybe some of the generators in a pinch. But its still optional.

"The game will remain the same."

Personally, I feel the game is taking one giant leap for Dungeon kind.
Assuming that each Dragon and Dungeon magazine runs you $3, and assuming that the expanded content runs you an extra $1 (and both of these estimates are probably low) in terms of worth, that leaves $2 left for the entire suite of digital tools per month. Assuming you use the tools for eight years, that's $192. That's about the same price as it would cost you to purchase these packages separately, and not counting the extra costs associated with continually purchasing expansions to the product as new books and supplements are released. You're getting a hell of a deal on this.

It's only a "hell of a deal" if you would have gotten all those magazines. If you only want the basic campaign tools (and if such tools are at all useful you should be able to enter custom material, making the purchase of expansions a convenience rather than a necessity) it's not so great. Even moreso if you want them available offline. Such is software you should be able to buy for a reasonable fee.
At least I have my proper avatar now, I guess. But man is this cloud dark.
It's only a "hell of a deal" if you would have gotten all those magazines. If you only want the basic campaign tools (and if such tools are at all useful you should be able to enter custom material, making the purchase of expansions a convenience rather than a necessity) it's not so great. Even moreso if you want them available offline. Such is software you should be able to buy for a reasonable fee.

I'm sure there will also be third party options as well.
Please forgive me if this has been asked and answered already but these threads are just getting too bloody long to read all the content.

Is the following statement correct:

DM X puts together an online game using DDI for all his friends around the world and a couple strangers and says "books allowed: all core plus xyz series"

Gamer A has every book ever written for 4th edition so can use any of the options the DM allows

Gamer B has most of the books but not everything and must create a character using only the books he has purchased and added to his personal DDI database.

Gamer C has only the PHB and must limit his character creation options to core only

Gamer D is new to gaming and would love to try out D&D but hasn't decided if he wants to buy the PHB yet. He pays for a DDI account but as he has no books to populate his database he has nothing from which to make a character.

Now if I was Gamer A or B I would be pretty ok with playing in the above game. If I was player C I think I would have to pass and look for a core only game. And what is poor Gamer D to do?

- Will there be a free trial access to the core rules, so Gamer D can give the game a try?

- Can I, as a DM, manually type up a copy of a feat or class from a 4th edition book and add it using the "homebrew" option so Gamer C isn't at a disadvantage in my game?

- Will there be a fee that allows players to add books, they do not have hard copies of, to their database?

I'm a little concerned that all of my "poor" friends will be less interest in playing in a game were they have far fewer options for their characters than myself and the other players.

I can already see one of my moocher friends saying "come on man, let me use your account for this game, you're not even playing a psion and I don't have the book."
- Will there be a fee that allows players to add books, they do not have hard copies of, to their database?

Well, this one, at least, seems to already be answered. If they can get the code from a legitimate owner of the book (e.g. the DM in your example) and pay the fee (said to be comparable to a coffee, which is deliberately ambiguous, could be anything from about 75 cents to about 6 bucks) that should unlock the relevant options.
Jeff Heikkinen DCI Rules Advisor since Dec 25, 2011
Well thats something at least. I mean, if you can't come up with a few bucks to add the new content to your database, after I had to pony up the whole cost of the book then I don't have have a whole lot of sympathy. (run on sentence much :D )
Well thats something at least. I mean, if you can't come up with a few bucks to add the new content to your database, after I had to pony up the whole cost of the book then I don't have have a whole lot of sympathy. (run on sentence much :D )

Mind you, I could be mistaken in the following way. Some people seem to think the key will be unique to each copy of a given book, and only work on one account. If both those assumptions are true, my (relative) optimism would be unwarranted.

I suspect one or both of those assumptions is actually false. I doubt the first on the grounds that the logistics of that would add too much to WotC's (and in the end, the customer's) bottom line to be worth doing. And I doubt the second because, even if the first is true, the first thing I would do if such a system was in place would be to make sure DMs could then unlock options on behalf of their players, at least for the purposes of a particular campaign; I'd be surprised not to see such an option. But that is, admittedly, speculation on my part.
Jeff Heikkinen DCI Rules Advisor since Dec 25, 2011
All of D&D Insider is just an addition, and add-on to what you can already do.

Unfortunately, everything I have heard about D&D Insider implies that it is not merely a set of additional options. Rather, it seems that 4th edition was designed with Insider's tools and options in mind:

At the same time, we also began imagining a robust and exciting suite of digital features that could enhance and complement the roleplaying game. It became clear to me that we had two winning directions that would be even more powerful when we combined them, and that’s when we made the decision to move forward with D&D 4th Edition. (wizards.com Ampersand article)

Prepare to experience D&D the way it was meant to be: maximum imagination, scintillating strategy, and full-throttle fun. (press pack, D&D Insider Fact Sheet)

As the rules expand, these tools will be updated so the digital product and physical product remain closely integrated. (D&D 4th Edition introduction video [youtube edition])

According to the above info from Wizards, Insider is needed to complete 4th edition (that's what complement, with an "e", means), is "the way [4th edition] was meant to be," and is closely integrated with the game. All of this info clearly implies that 4th edition character creation, encounter building, dungeon design and the like were designed with Insider's tools in mind, as opposed to being designed primarily for the core books' paper-and-pencil-only methods.

Absolutely, 4th edition will be very playable without Insider; hundreds of playtesters are playing it without Insider right now. However, Wizards has made it clear as day that 4th edition and Insider were developed with each other in mind, which means that playing 4th edition without Insider will mean playing it without the tools it was truly designed for.
According to the above info from Wizards, Insider is needed to complete 4th edition (that's what complement, with an "e", means),

No it doesn't, at least not in the sense in which you're trying to make it sound as though it does. It generally has the connotation of two things working really well hand-in-hand, but not of either one being absolutely necessary for the other.
is "the way [4th edition] was meant to be,"

No, is "the way D&D was meant to be". A very, very important distinction.

You seem to be going over these statements with a fine-toothed comb, actively looking for words that can be twisted to support the idea of D&DI being a necessary part of the game. Stop.
Jeff Heikkinen DCI Rules Advisor since Dec 25, 2011
It generally has the connotation of two things working really well hand-in-hand, but not of either one being absolutely necessary for the other.

"Complement" has always had the denotation of completion, or of two things which are not complete without one another. Still, you're right. People just aren't that careful with diction; heck, I'm not that careful with my diction. So, I probably am reading too much into this first statement.

No, is "the way D&D was meant to be". A very, very important distinction.

All of this is, of course, reading between the lines; Wizards isn't going to come out and say "4th edition was designed for Insider's tools" because it probably isn't quite that simple and because such a statement would estrange players like me anyway. They also aren't going to say "4th edition was not designed for Insider's tools," again, because it probably isn't quite that simple and because such a statement might hurt Insider's sales. To get information of this sort, we have to read between the lines; it's just that simple.

That statement is indeed that Dungeons & Dragons as a developing game, and not merely that 4th edition, was "meant to be" experienced with the convenience that Insider's materials provide. It comes to the same thing: if Wizards believes that D&D was meant to be experienced with helpful tools like Insider's, then Wizards has obviously designed their ideal edition of the game for Insider's tools.

You seem to be going over these statements with a fine-toothed comb, actively looking for words that can be twisted to support the idea of D&DI being a necessary part of the game. Stop.

I am indeed going over every Wizards statement about Insider carefully, looking for every indication I can find of whether or not 4th edition itself was designed first and foremost for use with pencil-and-paper methods or for use with Insider's tools. If you can offer some statements that imply or state that first option, I'd appreciate it if you would post them; I haven't been able to find any yet.
How's the Mac version coming along?

Thanks, -- N
Hey all,

I'm a Mac user and was really curious about the platform compatibility. I sent ScottR a message and this is what I found out:

Third, the D&DI client applications will be developed for the PC platform. Two of the D&DI applications use a 3D game engine based on DirectX (The game table and the character builder, both demoed in their prototype version at Gencon). The other applications will be designed for windows, but will not rely on this 3D game engine so that they can be used on lower end platforms (possibly including intel based macs with dual boot). Our recommended specs for the PC platform includes Windows XP SP2, 512MB RAM, AMD XP 2400 + or Intel P4 2.6Ghz, and a graphic card with 128 MB RAM and support of shader 2.0.
We have not yet established our minimum specifications at that time.

It looks like Linux and Mac users are NOT the target audience (MMO, PCs users are), although if you're considering a new Mac with dual boots (OSx and Windows XP), you'll still be able to use this. Provided you buy something that's 2.6 and faster (current laptops are in the 2.16 range).

I'm curious as to what the "minimum requirements" will be.

~Jaye
Is there any plan of international support (especially in French) ?
DirectX eh? Somebody in the development team has a hate-on for the Mac.

Recommendations: Fire him, you dont need that kind of bigot working for you. Once he's gone drop DirectX like a squirmy skull. There are other tools available that'll make it easier to port to Linux and Mac. Last I heard no single PC manufacturer beats Apple, it's in aggregate sales that the PC beats the Mac. So there's support for Mac compatible apps and utilities, enough to make supplying such profitable.

Never alienate potential customers the way certain parties at your company seem determined to do.
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