3/31/2014 MM: "Lenticular Design"

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This thread is for discussion of this week's Making Magic, which goes live Monday morning on magicthegathering.com.

Excellent article. I hope that Lenticular design is something that other game designers take to heart: I really feel that it could help push tabletop gaming into another level of accessibility.

"Ah, the age-old conundrum. Defenders of a game are too blind to see it's broken, and critics are too idiotic to see that it isn't." - Brian McCormick

One of the best articles in a while.  Very insightful.

If you're on MTGO check out the Free Events via PDCMagic and Gatherling.

Other games you should try:
DC Universe Online - action-based MMO.  Free to play.  Surprisingly well-designed combat and classes.

Planetside 2 - Free to play MMO-meets-FPS and the first shooter I've liked in ages.
Simunomics - Free-to-play economy simulation game.

I don't think avoiding taking about the stack is helping access for new players

 

I don't know how many times I've explained nuances

 

write basic stack practice on common instant cards in each color

NO WAR
Asking ITC Defense Corp. ‏@itc_defense DoD SBIR/STTR ‏@dodsbir
why does why does the face of defense #DOD calls its targets terrorist invoking bias?
airstrike article / twitter cell

 

 

 

Yes, this was a fantastic article. Really interesting to those of us who like to design, either custom Magic cardsets or other board games. Actually finding ways to make lenticular commons is still pretty tricky, but at least we can understand better what we're aiming for now.

 

It's likely even applicable to computer games as well; I think I can see evidence of a lot of lenticular design in Starcraft II, for example. 

Why is prodigal pyromancer too complex? That actually introduces strategic complexity well to players

The article directly answers that question: it introduces to much board​ complexity.

"Proc" stands for "Programmed Random OCcurance". It does not even vaguely apply to anything Magic cards do. Don't use it.

Level 1 Judge as of 09/26/2013

Zammm = Batman

"Ability words are flavor text for Melvins." -- Fallingman

Matt_Holck wrote:

I don't think avoiding taking about the stack is helping access for new players

 

I don't know how many times I've explained nuances

 

write basic stack practice on common instant cards in each color

And while they're at it, they should just print the rule book on every card so we don't have to explain anything to new players. They can read, can't they?

could not play with out reading

 

just on some basic cards with one ability mostly

and on cards where the rules may not be intuitive

 

magic includes both actions and objects

being aware of the action turn elements of the game is important to understanding how cards can be used.

NO WAR
Asking ITC Defense Corp. ‏@itc_defense DoD SBIR/STTR ‏@dodsbir
why does why does the face of defense #DOD calls its targets terrorist invoking bias?
airstrike article / twitter cell

 

 

 

I only played Theros limited about three or four times (didn't care for it), or BNG limited once (it that's what Maro meant based on when this is coming out), but I really don't remember a lot of (your own) things that want to be flickered. There's not a lot of ETB triggers, no Pacifism effects, and if you're Voltroning everything up flickering is particularly useless (you don't even really get to "counter" removal with it if your bestow guys and other auras are just going to fall off anyway). Am I forgetting some cards, am I being a total n00b, or is Maro's head just in some other Theros limited from playtesting?

Anyway, my puzzlement over that aside, this was really an excellent article. I've been backing off from reading everything Maro writes quite so much, so I actually passed this over yesterday because I'd already read the original article and figured this would be more of the same. It's not; it's very different, and even gives me insight into how my own strategic brain works.

Well there's not a lot of flicker-worthy stuff, true.  But situationally there could be.  For example a tribute creature like Shrike Harpy - if they sacrificed a creature instead of giving you counters, you can force them to make that choice again.  So it's not an environment heavy in that kind of thing, but there are opportunities.

If you're on MTGO check out the Free Events via PDCMagic and Gatherling.

Other games you should try:
DC Universe Online - action-based MMO.  Free to play.  Surprisingly well-designed combat and classes.

Planetside 2 - Free to play MMO-meets-FPS and the first shooter I've liked in ages.
Simunomics - Free-to-play economy simulation game.

lewis440lewis wrote:
 There's not a lot of ETB triggers

 

http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Search/Default.aspx?action=advanced&type=+[%22Creature%22]&text=+[%22Enters%20the%20battlefield%22]&set=+[%22Theros%22]

Generally, I have found the following uses for Rescue in Theros block limited:

 

1) Black has some good ETB triggers.  The best is Gray Merchant, and a deck with several Gray Merchants is usually where I end up playing the card.  There are other decent ones like Disciple of Phenax though.  Tribute works here too.

2) Gives a free chump block that blanks lifelink from an enormous, Hopeful Eidolon'ed thing.

3) Effectively counters removal when used in response

4) Can generate surprise blockers when you use it with something carrying bestow guys

5) Can just reanimate something, preferably something big

6) Resets monstrous, and black's gorgons have some of the best on-monstrous triggers 

7) Some even more niche uses, like freeing a creature tapped down by a Shipbreaker Kraken

 

Most of these are just gravy, but are things to keep in mind in case they come up.  The real reason for playing it is to rescue Gray Merchant, preferably with another Gray Merchant, as it is kind of expensive and clunky otherwise.

Matt_Holck wrote:

being aware of the action turn elements of the game is important to understanding how cards can be used.

So is not being overwhelmed. Just because something's possible doesn't mean players should understand all of those possibilities their first time at bat. It's just like Mark's example with Rescue from the Underworld: let there be a deeper meaning for those that understand the nuance, but give the new players a clear opening to climb to that point.

Whenever I've taught people Magic, I don't think "the stack" has come up before at least game 5 or 6, which is around when they start playing instants strategically. So why do they need to know about the stack on potentially the very first common they look at?

the stack is a main appeal of magic

wizard throws a spell

enemy wizard throws a spell that will make that first spell mote

it's claassic counter magic duel

 

they won't understand all the possibities

but reading the game rules won't confuse them either

NO WAR
Asking ITC Defense Corp. ‏@itc_defense DoD SBIR/STTR ‏@dodsbir
why does why does the face of defense #DOD calls its targets terrorist invoking bias?
airstrike article / twitter cell

 

 

 

In my opinion the most major problem beginners tend to have is problems with timing. They learn the actual process of a turn and card types first, then combat. After that they would learn about timing. But they tend not to, for whatever reason and that's generally a bad thing. In my opinion 2 minutes of more rules explanation is well worth avoiding a rules conflict with a beginner. Rules conflicts are really quite bad. That said I found the article very insightful.
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