3/14/2014 LD: "Days of Future Future—Born of the Gods"

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This thread is for discussion of this week's Latest Developments, which goes live Friday morning on magicthegathering.com.

1) When was the last time you guys in Development actually produced a format that wasn't solvable in a matter of weeks?  I think the last time was somewhere around Ravnica (not Return, the original).  If you're going to make us suffer by intentionally not knowing what you're doing (or, as you like to say, "making the format hard to solve"), please at least make the puzzle difficult for us.

 

2) This article would have been a lot more interesting if you'd told us what the cards did at the time than simply presenting decklists.  For example, I have a hard time believing that even Tom LaPille, as little as I think of him, even he wouldn't build an Ephara deck with both Cloudfin Raptor (a very tempo-oriented aggressive card) and Omenspeaker (a very grindey controlling card) without even adding a single copy of Soldier of the Pantheon.  I'd be interested in knowing what LaPille was thinking when he thought this would be an example of a real-world Ephara deck despite the cards being so obviously uncomplementary to one another (in their final forms, at least; perhaps the cards were different in the FFL).

Huh? The Ephara deck is a Master of Waves / Thassa deck. Why would it play a permanent with no blue mana symbols in its cost at all? For that matter, only 4 of its lands make white mana on turn 1; why would it play a white card that's rather subpar on turns 2+ at all?

 

(Similarly Josh Jelin's Master of Waves deck seems curiously undevoted. Apart from the Masters, the only permanents with blue mana symbols are 4 Omenspeaker, 4 Detention Sphere and 3 Jace. Will the Master actually make anything like enough tokens to win with like that? Why not use some other finisher? Maybe at the time the Temples had mana costs or some such??)

That 5-color deck though XD.  That looks like a lot of fun.

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From Mark Rosewater's Tumblr: the0uroboros asked: How in the same set can we have a hexproof, unsacrificable(not a word) creature AND a land that makes it uncounterable. How does this lead to interactive play? I believe I’m able to play my creature and you have to deal with it is much more interactive than you counter my creature.

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Post #777

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MaRo: One of the classic R&D stories happened during a Scars of Mirrodin draft. Erik Lauer was sitting to my right (meaning that he passed to me in the first and third packs). At the end of the draft, Erik was upset because I was in his colors (black-green). He said, "Didn't you see the signals? I went into black-green in pack one." I replied, "Didn't you see my signals? I started drafting infect six drafts ago."

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MaRo: I redesigned him while the effect was on the stack.

Ertai87 wrote:

For example, I have a hard time believing that even Tom LaPille, as little as I think of him, even he wouldn't build an Ephara deck with both Cloudfin Raptor (a very tempo-oriented aggressive card) and Omenspeaker (a very grindey controlling card) without even adding a single copy of Soldier of the Pantheon. I'd be interested in knowing what LaPille was thinking when he thought this would be an example of a real-world Ephara deck despite the cards being so obviously uncomplementary to one another (in their final forms, at least; perhaps the cards were different in the FFL).

 

If you compare LaPille's deck to Garruk17's blue devotion deck featured in Perilous Research last week, you can see they are pretty similar. Garruk17 did not include Soldier of the Pantheons either.

 

alextfish wrote:

Huh? The Ephara deck is a Master of Waves / Thassa deck. Why would it play a permanent with no blue mana symbols in its cost at all? For that matter, only 4 of its lands make white mana on turn 1; why would it play a white card that's rather subpar on turns 2+ at all?

 

(Similarly Josh Jelin's Master of Waves deck seems curiously undevoted. Apart from the Masters, the only permanents with blue mana symbols are 4 Omenspeaker, 4 Detention Sphere and 3 Jace. Will the Master actually make anything like enough tokens to win with like that? Why not use some other finisher? Maybe at the time the Temples had mana costs or some such??)

 

I think it's using the same philosophy as Blue Moon did for running Master: that having a creature that makes 4-6 points of power t6 with a counterpsell up for protection is good enough (mana efficiency vs. raw power

PirateAmmo wrote:

 

Ertai87 wrote:

For example, I have a hard time believing that even Tom LaPille, as little as I think of him, even he wouldn't build an Ephara deck with both Cloudfin Raptor (a very tempo-oriented aggressive card) and Omenspeaker (a very grindey controlling card) without even adding a single copy of Soldier of the Pantheon. I'd be interested in knowing what LaPille was thinking when he thought this would be an example of a real-world Ephara deck despite the cards being so obviously uncomplementary to one another (in their final forms, at least; perhaps the cards were different in the FFL).

 

 

If you compare LaPille's deck to Garruk17's blue devotion deck featured in Perilous Research last week, you can see they are pretty similar. Garruk17 did not include Soldier of the Pantheons either.

 

 

 

That deck also doesn't include Omenspeaker.  At least all of those cards are tempo-ish cards that seem focused on the same sort of plan.  LaPille's deck is all over the place.

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