8/28/2013 Feature: "A Planeswalker's Guide to Theros: Part 2"

52 posts / 0 new
Last post
This thread is for discussion of the feature, "A Planeswalker's Guide to Theros: Part 2",   which goes live Wednesday morning on magicthegathering.com.

Dream_Spinner wrote:

holy ****

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

Bezog wrote:

holy ****

 

My thoughts exactly!

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

zammm wrote:

I liked this glimpse into Theros, but the continual references to Gods we haven't been told about annoyed me: Karametra, Iroas, Mogis, Keranos, and Ephara. We can sort of deduce some of their various domains from context, but it should still really have been covered in the gods article.
 

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

Senyuno wrote:

Amazon city, sounds cool.
 

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

deworde2510 wrote:

Karametra's discussed as the God of Orphans in the article, I guess most of her story is associated with Setessa. I did feel like I want more on the war twins though.
But I think it works, you get the feeling of the expanse of the pantheon, that there are important gods whereever you look rather than just the Big 5.
 

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

TobyornotToby wrote:

It's not a complaint about the content, but the way it is written.
I have the same issue with the Akros part, where the Stratians are mentioned a few times before they are explained. Same with those gods. It makes it a pretty tedious read to hear names all the time with no idea who/what they're referring to.

 

But actually I'm more annoyed by all that gorgeous Adam Paquette artwork that is just concept art and thus wont make it onto cards XD
Well except that forest artwork, that makes up for a lot! =)
 

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

MarkXero wrote:

I actually really liked that the gods were named and spoken about without us getting any sort of introduction to them. It made it feel like there was real depth here and that we are scholars just beginning to build our understanding of the culture: 'The gods are referenced because of course everyone on Theros knows who they are. What do you mean you don't know Iroas and Mogis? Jeez - do some background reading will you?' That's pretty much how I feel when I learn about real-world Ancient Greek mythology - like I should already know some of this stuff and it's written with the assumption I do.


I've come straight to this thread after finishing reading the article; I'm going to assume there is already a thread somewhere where people are putting these bits of info together into some kind of reference work. That'll be where I'm heading next...


ETA: Overall I thought this article was wonderful. The creative team are to be very highly commended on their world-building - it feels very real.  
 

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

EternalUnreality wrote:

TobyornotToby wrote:
It's not a complaint about the content, but the way it is written.
I have the same issue with the Akros part, where the Stratians are mentioned a few times before they are explained. Same with those gods.

This.  I can almost understand the sudden references to new Gods, as they don't necessarily have the time to provide description for everything.  But at least a list in the Gods article would have been preferable.

 

When I got to the reference of "Stratian duties," I went back to reread from the beginning because I thought I missed what Stratian meant, thinking that perhaps for some reason the people of Akros called themselves "Stratians," but then there was also the "Akroan" descriptor.  There was just no context.  I couldn't formulate a mental picture of what "Stratian duties" were, which totally interrupted me.  Then I skimmed downwards until I found out, then I went back up and reread the lines referencing "Stratian" in order to have the right image.

 

Writers: Don't do that.  Please at least define your words up front.

 

The amount of content here is amazing, though.  Theros is looking gorgeous, through and through.
 

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

ZursApprentice wrote:

I really like the idea behind Theros and the milieu is breathtaking.  I feel Innistrad and now Theros are sets that hit on common tropes in literature, which I think is more interesting than inventing new planes in many ways.  The one problem I have with the three cities of Theros as described is that it contradicts what was said previously.  It was said that although the theme of mythology would be touched on, the world would be original.  But the three cities described in the article are basically just rip-offs of Athens, Sparta, and Corinth.  I think it would have been cool to use the actual Greek Mythology in a Magic set.  But it was said that wouldn't be done.  Yet you've basically just ripped off Greek Mythology with very few changes, other than name changes, and called it your own.  Again, no complaints about the art or setting, which is breathtaking...this is only a complaint against the originality.
 

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

Croig wrote:

I'm guessing that all other gods they are mentiong are lesser gods, and are going to appear in the next few sets of the block.  Perhaps they are saving in depth descriptions of them until the Planeswalkers guides for those sets.  Kinda like how Zeus, Hades, and the rest of the children of Cronus were the big gods, and then you had the second tier of their children (Ares, Athena, Aphrodite, Apollo, Hermes etc), and then you had even lesser gods then that (Dionysus, Eros).   I'm wondering if these lesser gods will have a multicolor component to them, since the big 5 are obviously tied to mono color.  

 

I also wish Straitian had been defined, even if just with one sentence, before mentioning them repeatedly before the in depth description.  I also kept rereading the first part of the Akros part to try and figure out who they were.

 

Nonetheless, this is great work.  Makes me really excited for this block.  Looking forward to the Monsters guide next week!  
 

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

Bacl wrote:

I am very fascinated by the "Gods" of Theros being enchantments, or in other words: SPELLS. This reminds me very much of Angels within MTG as magical constructs.

 

The question this brings up is: Did someone create the Theros Gods, and, if so, who?

 

The answer I am drawn towards is, of course, pre-Mending Planeswalker (or Planeswalkers). This, again, reminds me of Sorin creating Avacyn in his pre-mending days.

 

It'll be really interesting to continue to learn about this plane. The feel and theme of it is very vivid and engaging already!  
 

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

Aldrick wrote:

Awesome stuff!

 

As to the comment about "ripping off" Greek city-states.... umm that's what top-down design is??

 

Also I think it's Athens, Sparta, and "the Amazons" (who clearly did not live in Corinth) 

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

unspeakable wrote:

The cities are clearly based on Athens, Sparta, and Pontus, which was the home of the amazons.  The primary gods were introduced in the earlier article; I have no problem with some minor gods being mentioned here without full explanation.

 

It seems like one of the main changes from the original greek mythos was a massive injection of Grrl power.  Melitis is ruled by head scholar Perisophia (female), and Akros is ruled by a male/female pair Anax and Cymede (even though the Spartans were notoriously male-dominated).  Two thirds or so of the heros of these cities appear to be female (Hypatia, Arissa, Nymosyne).  And then there is of course Setessa, which is essentially all female.  I guess it gives us lots of appealing artwork for the primarily male audience, but the unequal gender distribution is certainly noticeable.

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

alextfish wrote:

Unequal gender distribution? Perhaps, but far, far less unequal than history was (the other way). Women have been massively oppressed in almost every society in our world's history; it's nice to see that the creative team didn't feel the need to imitate that unfortunate part of history when creating this fictional but real-world-inspired setting.

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

SkyknightXi wrote:

I notice that they took from the original Hellenic myths that minotaurs are anthropophages (no, NOT cannibals; that would mean minotaurs eating other minotaurs). Don't worry, Tahngarth, I'm confident THESE minotaurs have no actual blood connection with Talruum.

(Mogis=Ares*Thanatos?)

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

Shamsiel wrote:

Have I mentioned how pleased I am that Theros Archons are evil and one of them had leonin minions?

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

AlexaM wrote:

alextfish wrote:
Unequal gender distribution? Perhaps, but far, far less unequal than history was (the other way). Women have been massively oppressed in almost every society in our world's history; it's nice to see that the creative team didn't feel the need to imitate that unfortunate part of history when creating this fictional but real-world-inspired setting.

As a woman, I have to say this made me happy.

 

I do hope it isn't all just Women! Everywhere! but I don't feel like this article gave me that impression.

 

(I really liked that the men of the "Amazon" culture have their own story that explains why they aren't around, and I hope some cards/flavor text/stories posted here will focus on their peregrination and what it means to them.)

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

Nathnor wrote:

SkyknightXi wrote:

(Mogis=Ares*Thanatos?)


Actually I believe Mogis and his twin Iroas are like Nemesis and Ares. Mogis likes to make that small part of a person that has hate, anger and revenge inside and make it all they care about. While Iroas is more concerned about winning, whether it be on the battlefield or in a competition (such as the games named after him/her).

 

The way I see it is they combined Nemesis and Areas, but took all the ideal things into Iroas while the negative things into Mogis.

 

And the back story on Anthousa could have been told different to make the card seem reasonable. Instead of the Karametra enchanting her directly, she could have made the trees come to life to hold down the colossus while she sliced it up. Making the card seem a lot better imo.

 

After re-reading that little snippet I think it does a better job of explaining the card. Nylea held the giant down with vines while Karametra made Anthousa much stronger to take care of the giant. All after Keranos sent down the lighting to awaken the colossus.


"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

Hibernia86 wrote:

In a fantasy world with magic, it makes sense to have a more equal number of male and female heros because physical strength isn't as important if you can cast spells. Also since the Amazons were in Greek myth, it makes sense to mirror them here. However in fantasy worlds without magic including female warriors is usually just to inspire the girls or give the women someone to identify with (or give a main character that the guys think is attractive). In a world where swords and archery are the primary means of warfare, physical strength differences between the genders puts women at too much of a disadvantage in battle to realistically have a chance as soldiers (you could argue that fantasy doesn't have to be realistic, but I feel there has to be at least some connection to the real world or else we can't identify with it at all). This is why men ruled the world for most of the last 10,000 years and probably millions of years before that (judging by the gender relations of apes like chimps and gorillas). That doesn't mean it should be that way, but it does mean that there were physical reasons why it was that way. Again, while I think that more equal gender representation makes sense in a spell casting world like Magic the Gathering, it wouldn't in a world where most warriors have no magic.


"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

AlexaM wrote:

Leaving the gender topic for a moment: does anyone else notice that all the poleis seem to be White-and-something-else aligned?

 

Maybe that has to do with humans tending to be associated with White. But I kind of felt oversaturated with it.

 

Especially since I didn't see anything yet that sounded Black and it felt a bit incomplete.

 

I really like this, but I hope we don't see a repeat of Innistrad where there are mostly-White-aligned human civilizations and then a whole bunch of other-colored strange beasts and critters. I liked it in Innistrad, but I'm not sure how big a fan I am of doing it twice in a (almost) row.

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

Senyuno wrote:

My real question is why did Kamigawa fail? How have they changed their approach? And why will it be accepted this time?

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

Hibernia86 wrote:

Doug Beyer of the creative team said that Akros is white/red, Setessa is white/green, and Meletis is white/blue. He didn't mention about black but some people have suggested that black may find its home among the monsters.

 

   tmblr.co/ZUrCEttVVCot

 

 

Mark Rosewater says that Kamigawa failed because it tried to match real Japanese mythology which Americans didn't understand. Innistrad focused more on American's understanding of gothic horror. Theros will do the same for Greek mythology. For example, there are no Krakens in Greek Mythology (or so I've been told) but there are in the American understanding of Greek mythology so Krakens would be more likely to show up in this set.

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

zammm wrote:

EternalUnreality wrote:
When I got to the reference of "Stratian duties," I went back to reread from the beginning because I thought I missed what Stratian meant, thinking that perhaps for some reason the people of Akros called themselves "Stratians," but then there was also the "Akroan" descriptor.  There was just no context.  I couldn't formulate a mental picture of what "Stratian duties" were, which totally interrupted me.  Then I skimmed downwards until I found out, then I went back up and reread the lines referencing "Stratian" in order to have the right image.

I did the exact same thing.


"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

deworde2510 wrote:

My real question is why did Kamigawa fail? How have they changed their approach? And why will it be accepted this time?

The story is that they found the expectation with Kamigawa was Kaiju or Manga rather than Shinto, an issue partly based on their predominantly teenage US fanbase which isn't exposed much to the atmosphere that would make KikiJiki Mirror Breaker make sense. That shouldn't be a problem here, as "Argonauts" is exactly meeting the expectations, and when you think "Ancient Greece", THIS IS SPARTA is pretty close to how they're going. (Note that Gerard Butler and Lena Headey are frontin' the Duel Deck)


I have to say, reading this stuff has definitely put me in a mood to re-watch Clash of the Titans. But I'll be so mopey if they don't include at least a few Strixes.


"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

Nathnor wrote:

AlexaM wrote:
Leaving the gender topic for a moment: does anyone else notice that all the poleis seem to be White-and-something-else aligned?


Maybe that has to do with humans tending to be associated with White. But I kind of felt oversaturated with it.


Especially since I didn't see anything yet that sounded Black and it felt a bit incomplete.


I really like this, but I hope we don't see a repeat of Innistrad where there are mostly-White-aligned human civilizations and then a whole bunch of other-colored strange beasts and critters. I liked it in Innistrad, but I'm not sure how big a fan I am of doing it twice in a (almost) row.


This may be the same as Innistrad, I'm not sure as I just recently got into Magic. Most humans will probably be red, blue and green with some white thrown in.


We'll probably get some black humans (no reference to the color of the human's skin) that have been corrupted by Mogis, as well as some creatures from the underworld and others such as minotaurs. The Triton will be blue, like most merfolk. The Setessans will be the "elves" of the plane, dealing with creatures and the forest. White will probably be related to a lot of the Archons and other holy creatures.


But because each polis worships almost all the gods, there will probably be some color bleeding. You might get some Triton that are U/W or U/R for the Triton hero mentioned earlier today. Some of the Setessan will probably be G/R, such as the one hero from Setessa that was in the Iroan Games that did well in the boxing/wrestling event, as well as there being G/W for the priests. Those that were from Akros and tainted by Mogis will likely be B/R. Medomai will likely be B/U. While some archons are B/W, like Agnomakhos, the Archon Tyrant. And the leonin might even be B/W on this plane.


Hopefully some of this makes sense, it seems like rambling to me.

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."


deworde2510 wrote:

AlexaM wrote:
Leaving the gender topic for a moment: does anyone else notice that all the poleis seem to be White-and-something-else aligned?

 

Maybe that has to do with humans tending to be associated with White. But I kind of felt oversaturated with it.

 

Especially since I didn't see anything yet that sounded Black and it felt a bit incomplete.

 

I really like this, but I hope we don't see a repeat of Innistrad where there are mostly-White-aligned human civilizations and then a whole bunch of other-colored strange beasts and critters. I liked it in Innistrad, but I'm not sure how big a fan I am of doing it twice in a (almost) row.

 

I think it's White as Order. Even Setessa is the order within the wilds, where the Nistos Forest is more the true wilds. The Androphages sound like they're tending towards the red and black, and I suspect that the storm god worshippers will also include some black-hearted rapscallions.

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

Shamsiel wrote:

I'm not seeing the in Stessa. It's seems pretty to me.


While some archons are B/W, like Agnomakhos, the Archon Tyrant. And the leonin might even be B/W on this plane.


While not impossible, I think they're most likely going to be , to distinguish from specters. Also, there's nothing specifically about Agnomakhos, unless you're implying can't be evil, in that case you need to look at many of Magic's previous antagonists.

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

Nathnor wrote:

Shamsiel wrote:
I'm not seeing the in Stessa. It's seems pretty to me.

While some archons are B/W, like Agnomakhos, the Archon Tyrant. And the leonin might even be B/W on this plane.

While not impossible, I think they're most likely going to be , to distinguish from specters. Also, there's nothing specifically about Agnomakhos, unless you're implying can't be evil, in that case you need to look at many of Magic's previous antagonists.

 

I still don't have a great concept on the color wheel, I read some articles but I don't think most of it sunk in. I'll go back and try to get better aquainted with them. For now I'll try and explain it as best I can.

 

Setessa takes in orphans and raise them. They care for their own, which seems to me.

 

Agnomakhos probably isn't . I was thinking he only did it for himself, and was just using the leonin. But he seems more after going back.

 

I wouldn't mind if some could mention some articles about the colors, I would love to get into the flavor of the game even more.

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

Fireballmage wrote:

People have talked about gender, but I also noticed that (Unlike many movies depicting Greek characters) the people spanned a range of different skin tones and appearances.

 

Also, I really hope that we see what happens to some of the men that leave Setessa; I get the feeling that they're going to be the weird one-off guys that exist outside of the main factions and cultures in every block (Ala Dark Confidant).

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

Chah wrote:

I love how the Amazons have a plausible reason why the female warrior ratio is so high.


I wonder what the heck Archons are. They're not just humans in a position of power? Are they a race of their own?

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

SkyknightXi wrote:

The amusing bit about the association of krakens (from NORSE lore) with Hellenic myth is that it all has to do with the original Clash of the Titans. Apparently, the writers lifted the word "kraken" wholesale from Tennyson's poetry, thinking he'd invented it. No such luck. (What I don't get is why they didn't name the monster after Ketos, which actually WAS tasked by Poseidon to devour Andromeda, or Polybotes, the gigas who was sealed under the island of Nisyros after the Gigantomachia.) Then again, the use of the kraken creature type in earlier sets has mostly established krakens with hideous sea monsters of all types, rather than just outsize squids and octopi (which have separate creature types of their own--as in, krakens WEREN'T turned into octopi or squids after the Great Creature Type Update). So think of this as being akin to selkies being classed as merfolk, and liches as zombies. Ketos lookalikes, in turn, get classed as krakens.


(No, I don't expect to see the noggle type turn up in here. The hag type, on the other hand...think in terms of the Graeae.)


EDIT @Chah: Technically, "archon" just means ruler. However, at least in Gnostic mythic imagery, archons are spirits who are determined to keep the substance of the universe EXACTLY the way it is. And this is more important than the well-being of its constituents. If you're lucky, they're "just" fanatically Lawful Neutral. The problem comes with the many Lawful Evil archons who think oppression is DESERVED BY AND NECESSARY FOR lower material life-forms.


(And now that I think of it, the Formalists sound a lot like some strands of Platon's thought. Let's hope one of them doesn't turn Omnicidal Maniac in a desperate attempt to "perfect" Theros by merging it with the Aether/Blind Eternities. Or is that the kind of threat that the phrase "Journey into Nyx" suggests is upcoming?)

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

LMTRK wrote:

Chah wrote:
I wonder what the heck Archons are. They're not just humans in a position of power? Are they a race of their own?

 


Archons are an existing creature type in Magic.


~ Tim

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

Hibernia86 wrote:

Fireballmage, yes a large percentage of the characters in this block are much darker skinned than the Greeks in real life and there are more female leaders than in real Greek history. Take that as you will.  

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

SkyknightXi wrote:

Well, one thing to remember is that some Hellenic divinities were imports from elsewhere. Such as Libya. Big example from there is Athene--she was originally part of a Libyan triune goddess, along with Metis and Medusa. Yes, you read that correctly. Making it even more interesting is that the usual depiction of Medusa in Libya, before the person of Perseus was even imagined, was as a female winged centaur, whose hoof-strikes on the earth conjured both freshwater springs and
snakes.


There's a reason why I like to think Pegasos was effectively the REINCARNATION of Medusa, not a child of her and Poseidon--Chrysaor was an only child, in my view.

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

Shamsiel wrote:

SkyknightXi wrote:
@Chah: Technically, "archon" just means ruler. However, at least in Gnostic mythic imagery, archons are spirits who are determined to keep the substance of the universe EXACTLY the way it is. And this is more important than the well-being of its constituents. If you're lucky, they're "just" fanatically Lawful Neutral. The problem comes with the many Lawful Evil archons who think oppression is DESERVED BY AND NECESSARY FOR lower material life-forms.


(And now that I think of it, the Formalists sound a lot like some strands of Platon's thought. Let's hope one of them doesn't turn Omnicidal Maniac in a desperate attempt to "perfect" Theros by merging it with the Aether/Blind Eternities. Or is that the kind of threat that the phrase "Journey into Nyx" suggests is upcoming?)



Exactly. Archons, according to Doug at least, are basically the representation of everything wrong with , just like gnostic archons were everything wrong with bureaucracy and order.

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

Hotspur000 wrote:

Yes, they're certainly giving Theros its own flavour, but does anyone feel like this already sort of Return to Return to Ravnica?

I'm getting very Ravnica-ish feelings while reading through this stuff.

(Not that that's a bad thing ... just saying).  

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

ZursApprentice wrote:

Hotspur000 wrote:
Yes, they're certainly giving Theros its own flavour, but does anyone feel like this already sort of Return to Return to Ravnica?


I'm getting very Ravnica-ish feelings while reading through this stuff.


(Not that that's a bad thing ... just saying).


A little, in the sense that they are basically Boros, Selesnya, and Azorius aligned.  However, it's fairly difficult to make dual color tribes/civilizations WITHOUT reminding people of Ravnica.  Ravnica was one of the most successful sets ever and it's what comes to most people's minds when there are dual color affiliations.  To me this set is what would happen if you mixed Innistrad, Kamigawa, and Ravnica together with a little Greek Mythology flair.  Not saying this is a bad thing... and I feel where you're coming from.  


"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

Hotspur000 wrote:

ZursApprentice wrote:
Hotspur000 wrote:
Yes, they're certainly giving Theros its own flavour, but does anyone feel like this already sort of Return to Return to Ravnica?


I'm getting very Ravnica-ish feelings while reading through this stuff.


(Not that that's a bad thing ... just saying).


A little, in the sense that they are basically Boros, Selesnya, and Azorius aligned.  However, it's fairly difficult to make dual color tribes/civilizations WITHOUT reminding people of Ravnica.  Ravnica was one of the most successful sets ever and it's what comes to most people's minds when there are dual color affiliations.  To me this set is what would happen if you mixed Innistrad, Kamigawa, and Ravnica together with a little Greek Mythology flair.  Not saying this is a bad thing... and I feel where you're coming from.  


Yeah, that all makes sense.

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."


BorosGreengrocer wrote:

Hibernia86 wrote:
Fireballmage, yes a large percentage of the characters in this block are much darker skinned than the Greeks in real life

The Greek world included bits of modern day Turkey, Persia, Egypt, maybe down to Ethiopia and Sudan as well. So there would have been plenty of dark-skinned people around.

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

unspeakable wrote:

alextfish wrote:
Unequal gender distribution? Perhaps, but far, far less unequal than history was (the other way). Women have been massively oppressed in almost every society in our world's history; it's nice to see that the creative team didn't feel the need to imitate that unfortunate part of history when creating this fictional but real-world-inspired setting.


I can appreciate why the creative team would want to include a balanced gender representation rather than a historic reflection, since it reflects contemporary norms and MTG is not a history lesson.  What puzzles me is the female dominance that appears to be present in the upcoming set.  It appears that you are arguing that this is positive thing, as it essentially amounts to affirmative action (i.e., positive discrimination) favoring females to offset discrimination that occured thousands of years ago.  Perhaps that is the reason why WOTC is choosing to do that here.  I tend to believe it is being done for marketing reasons, for the same reason that putting attractive female images on a magazine cover results in more copies of the magazine being sold.  I am not passing judgement either way; just making an observation.  With regard to affirmative action, it is generally recommended only when there are lingering disadvantages from earlier mistreatment, not as an act of balancing historic wrongs.  Trying to balance historic wrongs, given the different time periods, makes about as much sense as nuking mongolia today because that's where the mongol invations came from 1000 years ago.

"Words of power never disappear. They sleep, awaiting those with the will to rouse them."

Sign In to post comments