For movement rate what are squares?

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I just read Bill Slavicsek's description of elves on the Dragon page for 4th edition and their movement is 7 squares. What does this mean? I usually use 10 foot squares for my scale on the graph paper. Does this mean elves can move 70 feet or is WoTC only giving the movement rate for their Dungeon tiles so that we have to buy these products. I am really thinking if they are trying to blur the line between RPG and miniature war gaming I am out.
1 square = 5 feet in 3rd Edition, don't see any reason why they'd change this in 4th.

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1 square = 5 feet in 3rd Edition, don't see any reason why they'd change this in 4th.

I have used 10 foot squares since 1st edition and have not changed. I wish they just say that the creature has so many feet movement. Most of the gaming material for 3rd and 3.5 have noted movement in feet.
I have used 10 foot squares since 1st edition and have not changed. I wish they just say that the creature has so many feet movement. Most of the gaming material for 3rd and 3.5 have noted movement in feet.

two likely reasons.

1. Why bother dealing with converting feat to square on the battle mat when the entries simply list squares.

2. The U.S. is one of what, only three countries in the world that have not converted to metric. So having to rewrite all those entries for international editions is simply a waste of time and money when the entries simply list squares.
Of all the things to complain about, this has to take the cake. Giving measure in feet is counter-intuitive, and as well don't forget this game is marketed in places that use metric. Most people will look at that 30' move rate and ask "how many squares is that?"

I've been playing since first edition too. We used miniatures and battle mats back then too even though it wasn't supported as intrinsically by the rules. When we DM'ed we sometimes drew the maps as 10' to the square on graph paper. But when we mapped things up on a grid, it was always 5' to the square -supporting the two characters abreast in a 10' wide corridor.

So maybe you should find something more significant to critque - or are you just one of those people so opposed to any new edition that you have to go turning over every last pebble in hopes of turning up a slug.
I do not use battlemats or dungeon tiles. I have a dungeon drawn on graph paper behind my DM screen. If we use miniatures it is on the table top. I am an old fashion D&D player. Again I reiterate I do not play miniature war games. D&D should be geared for storytelling even more so than anything the White Wolf publishes. Movement rates should be left up to the DM. I prefer feet because I live in the US.
Is it truly so difficult to take the number of squares and multiply it by five? No matter what, you will always have an accurate description of base speeds that way. People complained when Star Wars Saga Edition explained everything in squares, but it works just fine.

Wizards deciding to explain base speeds and the like in squares accomplishes some major goals that the company does, and/or should, have.

1. The minis they create are easily streamlined into the roleplaying game, thus helping to boost the sales of either department.

2. People all around the world won't have to worry about complex mathemetical equations. If they want to work in feet, Squares x 5. If they want to work in meters, Squares x 1.5.

3. Distance modifiers, such as for Perception, are simplified. This is a good step towards speeding up gameplay and streamlining the rules.

There are probably other reasons, but I haven't thought them up just yet. Two of those I remember from the Saga Edition debate a while back. Back then, I had found myself wondering, 'why' as well. Now, I find the squares to be very efficient.
One Obvious reason to use Squares Vs Movement rates.
Now you don't have to worry about calculating diagonal movements.
7 Diagonal Squares = 7 Diagonal Squares
under the old 5 foot system
7 Diagonal Squares would = 5+10+5+10+5+10+5=50...

opps sorry your movement is only 30 should have went 6 squares straight instead of 4 diagonal

Second obvious reason...Gametable..It will be easier to code and impliment . Such as being able to turn corners and move forward continuously
7 Diagonal Squares = 7 Diagonal Squares
under the old 5 foot system
7 Diagonal Squares would = 5+10+5+10+5+10+5=50...

We don't know if the new system uses 1-1 or 1-2 method for diagonal movement.

"I don't know half of you half as well as I should like; and I like less than half of you half as well as you deserve."

2. People all around the world won't have to worry about complex mathemetical equations. If they want to work in feet, Squares x 5. If they want to work in meters, Squares x 1.5.

While it might feel more politically correct to use a neutral term, multiplying a number of squares by 1.5 instead of multiplying a number of feet by 0.3, doesn't feel like much of an improvement for me.

Especially since 3.x had mostly feet given in 10' increments (lose the zero, multiply by 3, giving nice whole meters), but 4e seems to go with 5 squares (elven perception aura) or 7 squares (elven movement), which will result in a lot of nasty fractions. Bleeh.
hehe, Oldtimer you sure like to argue :P

personally i prefer squares in front of meters because it reduces the work when working on graph paper or whatever mats you got. i don't need to know at every moment how long a distance is on the paper in meters or feet, but i need to know how many squares that is for gameplay reasons.

on the topic of diagonal movement. they might go in the direction of saga where it always costs 2 movements. not a big fan of that, but it shortens down calculation time.

but i feel that it will be more important to pay attention to players positions in 4e than it has been before. there seems to be alot more abilities around that move people around if they want to or not. so that could be a problem for some.
I thought Squares was steps. As to illiminate the 5ft corridor.
I do not use battlemats or dungeon tiles. I have a dungeon drawn on graph paper behind my DM screen. If we use miniatures it is on the table top. I am an old fashion D&D player. Again I reiterate I do not play miniature war games. D&D should be geared for storytelling even more so than anything the White Wolf publishes. Movement rates should be left up to the DM. I prefer feet because I live in the US.

No.

D&D is a game about killing things and taking their stuff. It always has been. It isn't designed, nor will it ever be designed, for a storytelling group. There are other games that are better for this. Look into them.

Do not complain about something that utilizes official materials and rules from prior editions if you do not wish to use those materials and rules. In 3.5, things were listed in "steps", "squares" and "feet". This is because a "Square" is always 5 Feet. A Five Foot Step is 1 square and it's the smallest movement you can make in D&D 3.0 and 3.5. This is the way it's been for over 7 years now.

If you want to use nonstandard materials, your own materials, get used to thinking about things with conversions. They're your materials, WotC isn't designing for your materials. They're designing for their materials.
I just read Bill Slavicsek's description of elves on the Dragon page for 4th edition and their movement is 7 squares. What does this mean? I usually use 10 foot squares for my scale on the graph paper. Does this mean elves can move 70 feet or is WoTC only giving the movement rate for their Dungeon tiles so that we have to buy these products. I am really thinking if they are trying to blur the line between RPG and miniature war gaming I am out.

In Star Wars Saga Edition all races had their movement listed in Squares and 1xSquare=1.5 metres (or 5 foot if you're from USA, Libya or Myanmar).
I've done both, and it actually is faster to count squares as opposed to increments of 5 feet. It helps to do these little things to speed up combat.
I'll just say this, is it really that hard to simply divide the number of squares a character can walk by half if the squares are 5' and you use 10'?

Also, D&D while yes it is a storytelling system, it is based combatively around the tileset. WoD on the otherhand is based around simple descriptions. Neither system is superior, but each have their benefits, want a more tactiful-indepth combat-system go with D&D and thus the tiles. If you want a more freeflowing, dramatically flared combat but at the cost of having less complex/tactiful abilities (or the ability to see such things happen infront of you) go with WoD.
What I'd like to know is whether a hex fits inside a square or if a square fits inside a hex in 4e.
I just read Bill Slavicsek's description of elves on the Dragon page for 4th edition and their movement is 7 squares. What does this mean? I usually use 10 foot squares for my scale on the graph paper. Does this mean elves can move 70 feet or is WoTC only giving the movement rate for their Dungeon tiles so that we have to buy these products. I am really thinking if they are trying to blur the line between RPG and miniature war gaming I am out.

Most gamers I know use battlemats with squares and miniatures to track combat. For those who use mats they tell us how meny squares, for those who don't it's likely 5 feet still.
I don't believe it's a money makeing thing as Wizards does not sell battlemats and you don't have to use there miniatures.
It does tie it in to there minis game though, which is helpfull when using them together.
What I'd like to know is whether a hex fits inside a square or if a square fits inside a hex in 4e.

Hexes are slightly larger then squares for movement [if you wanted to be very tight about it] but I'd advise using them the same as squares.
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