Post your favorite House Rules

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There's been so many great house rules thrown out among posts, I thought it'd be nice to have our favorites posted in one spot.

House rules have always been a big part of game development, so what better time to review them than now...while we eagerly await 4E.


Post your favorite house rules, describe how they work, and provide a brief description on why you like them so much.
For 4E, I imagine my house rules will be as follows:
1. Races will be truncated appropriately and human "races" will be expanded for the Hyborian or Nehwon world.

2. Voluntary weapon damage rule: If you roll a 1, you can shatter your weapon but do a critical (+10 points per every plus of the weapon)

3. Voluntary armor damage rule: on any given hit, you can break 2 points worth of AC to eliminate that hit.

4. Turn undead will be removed (again) and will only remain as a spell.

5. Alignment-based spells will be designated (enemy) if they haven't already done so

6. Spells that replace the need for common sense or heroics will be bumped up a level (making them less desirable, but not eliminating them from the game).

7. Clarification to my players about how our game differs from the regular rules and why: for example, armor classes tend to be much lower in our games (even for Tank fighters) for campaign-reasons.

Jay H
Colorado

Gamer Chiropractor - Hafner Chiropractic 305 S. Kipling st,Suite C-2, Lakewood, Co 80226 hafnerchiropractic.com

Favourite House Rule.

'There is no rule for this situation in the DMG. Go ahead and roll a die. If you roll high then something good happens.'
Favourite House Rule.'There is no rule for this situation in the DMG. Go ahead and roll a die. If you roll high then something good happens.'

"High is good for the players"...it's one of our favorite lines.

jh

Gamer Chiropractor - Hafner Chiropractic 305 S. Kipling st,Suite C-2, Lakewood, Co 80226 hafnerchiropractic.com

One of my many favorite house rules is allowing casters that prepare spells to increase their casting time by a full round and attempt to apply a metamagic feat (I have spellcraft DCs for different feats), failure botches the spell and the slot it is expended without any effect.

Another is using KS: Religion instead of spellcraft to "analyze" divine magic (KS: Nature for druids). I think it reduces the necessary skill point expenditure for clerics and druids, and increases the difference between the two types of magic.

I also have Clerics spontaneously cast their domain spells ... not cures or inflicts.

I allow casters the ability to cast cantrips indefinitely by expending their "arcane focus" similar to many psionic abilities. It is a concentration check nearly identical to the psionic focus rules to gather arcane or divine focus. Actually I call it “Divine Fervor” and “Arcane Eye” (because I give the benefits of detect magic constantly while they are focused).

I allow non caster classes the ability to cast spells at a severely increased preparation/casting time. Roughly an hour, and they have to make multiple spellcraft checks to prepare the spell. Using this system any character class may prepare a number of spells equal to his charisma modifier. These slots are non-level specific, and the skill checks determine how powerful and what level (and metamagics) are applied to the spell. Failure to properly prepare the spell has dire (ability score damage) consequences. Casting time is also increased in this case, and another spellcraft check is required to “fire” off the spell.

Any action described as “impossible” by the mechanics I apply a +40 DC to the check, and allow for crit 20s on skills (confirm for massive success or partial success).

I should probably clarify that one, in my games a nat 20 always wins. Skill check, save, attack, everything. I think the threat thing is great for attacks, and on other things (that normally don’t have crits) If the confirming roll does not succeed the check still “succeeds” but not as well – or with negative consequences. Rolling two nat 20s in a row results in “really cool awesomeness” happening (sometimes unrelated to the skill check).

I also have people confirm when they roll a 1. If the confirm roll succeeds it is a simple fail, if the confirm roll fails there is a consequence, and if the confirm roll is another one, well … a circumstantially appropriate “very bad thing” happens.

I treat each language as a separate skill that reaches “fluent” at rank 5. Ranks above five are understood to be the part “historical” knowledge of the language, as well as the skill rolled to “craft” writing or poetry or songs and what not. (characters gain 5xInt mod to allocate to starting language skills instead of the normal way). Native language starts with a default of 4. You don’t have to roll language to speak, only to “create” however being less than fluent applies a -5 modifier to all social skill checks made in the language.

I do not use the “common” language, but I regularly implement “trade languages.” I also utilize a “heart tongue” rule in a couple settings. This is a language that is only taught to natives (kinda like jargon/accent) and when speaking in heart tongue with the proper subject applies a +5 modifier to social checks like diplomacy and bluff.

I have “performance” objects (songs, plays, etc) that contain special modifiers and bonuses.

I ignore the component line for bard spells and simply require them make perform checks. I also have them regain spell slots via certain successful performances instead of rest.

I don’t know if this is a house rule or not, but I let wizards cast spells out of their spellbook like they were scrolls (removing the spell from the book) I call it “Book Burning”

I have added Smell and Run to the standard skills. (Smell is obvious if somewhat fuzzy when it comes to DCs (based on distance and wind direction)). Run allows you to take a full move action and check vs 10+distance where distance is the number of feet in excess of your normal movement you want to reach.

I allow KS: “Monster” (specific monster) to apply a +1 to damage and skill checks for every 5 ranks in the skill.

I allow KS: “Weapon” (specific weapon) to apply a +1 threat range to the attack per 5 skill ranks. It also serves as “proficiency” (replacing the need for the feats), but the feats aren’t gone – its an alternative.

I allow slight-of-hand to function like a lesser (and fallible) form of quickdraw.

I have removed allot of feats that annoy me.

I put Ambidexterity back in – but it has nothing to do with 2 weapon fighting. It allows you to access items in your inventory one action step faster, and hold twice as many items at once.

I allow characters to hold a number of items equal to their dex modifier (min equals the number of hands the character has) and I allow casters to maintain a number of active spells equal to their (casting score) modifier.

Again, not sure if this is a houserule, but I regularly advise clerics to add their holy symbol (masterwork price) to all equipment so that their weapon or breastplate can be treated as a divine focus “hands free.”

I have “alpha animals” which are normal animals with an intelligence of greater than average. This is simply implying a natural “leadership” trait of intelligence amongst the animal world, and brings in those “dogs that know more English than their name and food” and the “horse smarter than the cowboy” phenomena. (this is fantasy after all).

I have more, but I might have broke the char limit already … nope!
Probably the best house rule I've implemented for 3.x was that you can have no more than 3 classes (whether they are core classes or prestige classes).

I chose 3 in the spirit of 1st edition where the maximum that a multiclassed person could have was three (the most common being elven fighter/thief/magic-users). I decided that was enough to add character options without overloading the situation.

Some folks groaned when I announced the rule at the start of my current campaign. I'd been in a previous one where there were absurd builds such as 1 level in 10 different classes with base saves at 10th level in the +20 realm and was determined my campaign would not have the same problem.

Early on we had issues with Natural Spell feat, it was later houseruled that it was no longer available. It was just to overpowering. I think perhaps rather than 1 feat it should have been several feats if at all. One feat to replace V components and another to replace the S component, but I just decided to not allow it .
Reading books that gives feats is my favorite house rule. It was very overpowering but i loved it. This way Cleric in my game can have as many feats as fighter. Know i am thinking about giving a feat per level to every class.

Also in my game there is always point buy rule. I dont allow players to increase their score every 4 level but i give them a stat point which they can increase according to point buy system. They can hold it as much as they want to. This didnt effect the game actually
I can't wait to see how we can hack "magic" into tiny bits again for our lower-magic campaigns. You don't realize how dependent this game is on magic (I hate to say crutches) until try to lighten it up a little.

Drop Turn Undead: I've always considered it just an excuse for the DM to have to throw "extra" undead at the party..or worse..pre-written undead adventures are broken either direction (with or without cleric).


jh

Gamer Chiropractor - Hafner Chiropractic 305 S. Kipling st,Suite C-2, Lakewood, Co 80226 hafnerchiropractic.com

Metamagic feats do not increase level or casting time.

Spontaneous casters such as sorcs, favored souls, bards, ec. need no spell components and can apply metamagics freely, though only one application of a metamagic is allowed per turn. Prepared casters, such as wizards,can only prepare one per combat, which must be pre-applied and ready.

Called shots and parries are allowed. Bladesingers, Duelists, and Weaponmasters are allowed free parries each round equal to their attacks.

Level adjustment, EL, etc. are not used.

Confirm rolls were banned from existence from day 1. Any feat or weapon ability that bonuses confirm rolls becomes a flat addition to your threat range.

Keen and improved critical still stack.

Characters start with one-tenth normal wealth (only when I'm DMing).

Ability scores are rolled with a d20. (9 rolls, take the best, no scores 8 or less.)

I'm sure there's some I'm missing, but I'm sort of tired right now.
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Thank_Dog wrote:

2Chlorobutanal wrote:
I think that if you have to argue to convince others about the clarity of something, it's probably not as objectively clear as you think.

No, what it means is that some people just like to be obtuse.

Probably the best house rule I've implemented for 3.x was that you can have no more than 3 classes (whether they are core classes or prestige classes).
.....
Some folks groaned when I announced the rule at the start of my current campaign. I'd been in a previous one where there were absurd builds such as 1 level in 10 different classes with base saves at 10th level in the +20 realm and was determined my campaign would not have the same problem.
.....

You're not the only one, JRScott! My buddy's RttoEE campaign had NO multi-classing limitations and some players ended up with pretty absurd builds by integrating just one or two levels from various prestige classes for particular feats or special abilities, (which defeats the whole point of allowing prestige classes in the game, IMHO ). So when I stepped up to DM, my first House Rule was written thusly:

1. All Player Characters are limited to 3 total Character Classes until Epic Level (21st). ;)

My current campaign utilizes about a dozen house rules, mostly lifted from the Unearthed Arcana supplement, but if I had to choose my personal faves, I'd have to stick with the following:

1. Multiple attack bonus stats remain static (they do not diminish by 5 points per attack).

2. The 2 point bonus on strongest base saves (Fort / Reflex / Will) granted at first level is only counted once per save. (i.e. - bonuses granted for the same save type at 1st lvl. via Multi-Classing will not stack).

3. Spontaneous Domain Casting (UA page 64)

4. Daily Spell List (UA page 153) In my game, spell-casters should never have to memorize/prepare the same spell twice! They still have to prepare/know their spells, and are still limited by spell-levels-per-day, but they should always be allowed to cast any spell they've prepared as many times as their daily level allotment will permit. For instance: If a wizard is able to cast three 1st level spells per day, and he's memorized Magic Missile, he could conceivably cast three magic missiles that day, so long as he marks off how many spells he has cast for that level. Hence: the Daily Spell List. Anything that makes spell casting faster and easier to track in game is my kinda house rule!
Here's a couple more, your multiclassing post brought it to mind:

No multiclassing experience penalties, except where prestige classes are concerned. You must complete one PrC before taking another.

Saves stack normally, however, BAB continues progression through multiclasses as though you were still in the same class.
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Thank_Dog wrote:

2Chlorobutanal wrote:
I think that if you have to argue to convince others about the clarity of something, it's probably not as objectively clear as you think.

No, what it means is that some people just like to be obtuse.

I liked using the Besm D20 system because it allowed me to get to the cool stuff....not just the stuff that makes my character viable in combat(We used a system where you could spend EXP = 100 X lvl to buy a build point), for example when I made a knight I wanted to be based around my shield when I wasn't impaling things on my lance, i made it all the way to shield sling before freakish dice rolls on the GM's behalf (6 20's in a row no cheatin' either, cuz i watched him do this to my poor character. this lead to one of the players' confiscating this die something that he still won't give up to this very day, of course he only actually holds it while we are playing...it is the GMs' die after all) caused my character to be eaten by a bullet (further freakish rolling by everyone caused us to kill no less than 5 of these during one return to the temple of elemental evil campaign)
Knowledge skill checks can be made untrained, Perform can not. - Everyone knows something. Ever try to play a guitar w/o training, and make money? Good luck!
Probably my favorite house rule that is used in 3.x is a change to Save VS. Death spells and attacks.

Instead of killing an affected target outright, the character simply drops to 0 hit points on a failed save, and is treated as though they are "dying" meaning that they must still roll a successful stabilization check before their hit points drop to -10.

Also, players get a 2% bonus per character level to their stabilization check. so a 1st level character stabilizes at a percentage roll below 12% while a 20th level character has a 50% chance to stabilize. I realize that this favors higher level characters, but who wants to see their favorite character, whom they've played through 12 levels of adventuring snuffed out because of one vicious spell and an unlucky roll.

On that note, we've also done away with raise dead and other resurrection spells.
Another house rule...certain feats have been changed in my regular groups games...

here's a brief synopsis of some of the affected feats:

Toughness: Grants a +2 bonus to HP at each level from when the feat is taken

Weapon Focus: Grants +1 to ATK/DMG rolls and +1 to crit range with the chosen weapon (for example, with Weapon Focus: Longsword, the crit range of the weapon would become 18-20, instead of the normal 19-20)

Weapon Specialization: Open to all character classes who meet the +5 BAB and Weapon Focus prerequisites. Grants +2 to ATK/DMG rolls and +2 to the chosen weapon's crit range. These bonuses replace the bonuses granted by the Weapon Focus feat, they do not stack.

Weapon Mastery This feat is only available to Fighters of at least 10th level. Grants +4 to ATK/DMG rolls and +1 to the crit multiplier. ( So with Weapon Mastery: Longsword, the crit stats now look like 17-20 x3)

Furthermore, we have done away with Keen weapons...All magic weapons have an increased crit range equal to their enhancement bonus. So a +1 battleaxe adds 1 to it's crit. range making it 19-20, for example. This bonus stacks with bonuses granted by Weapon Focus feats.

Because of this, the Improved Critical feat has been removed, obviously. So far this has allowed the fighters in the group to deal damage on par with Rogues and Spellcasters at higher levels, also it has helped lessen the dependancy on magic items.
Weapon Mastery This feat is only available to Fighters of at least 10th level. Grants +4 to ATK/DMG rolls and +1 to the crit multiplier. ( So with Weapon Mastery: Longsword, the crit stats now look like 17-20 x3)

Furthermore, we have done away with Keen weapons...All magic weapons have an increased crit range equal to their enhancement bonus. So a +1 battleaxe adds 1 to it's crit. range making it 19-20, for example. This bonus stacks with bonuses granted by Weapon Focus feats.

Because of this, the Improved Critical feat has been removed, obviously. So far this has allowed the fighters in the group to deal damage on par with Rogues and Spellcasters at higher levels, also it has helped lessen the dependancy on magic items.

Does this not get really crazy at higher levels? With an +5 longsword you get crit threat on a 11-20, and don't scimitars start even better than that? At epic it would mean you crit threat every time.

I invented a weapon skill tree for fighters, giving maces stunning attacks and etc etc, I allowed fighters and barbarians to use fort instead of will saves at higher levels and called it body over mind.
Weapon Mastery This feat is only available to Fighters of at least 10th level. Grants +4 to ATK/DMG rolls and +1 to the crit multiplier. ( So with Weapon Mastery: Longsword, the crit stats now look like 17-20 x3)

Furthermore, we have done away with Keen weapons...All magic weapons have an increased crit range equal to their enhancement bonus. So a +1 battleaxe adds 1 to it's crit. range making it 19-20, for example. This bonus stacks with bonuses granted by Weapon Focus feats.

Because of this, the Improved Critical feat has been removed, obviously. So far this has allowed the fighters in the group to deal damage on par with Rogues and Spellcasters at higher levels, also it has helped lessen the dependancy on magic items.

We have a weapon mastery feat as well, but we got ours out of a third-party book simply titled "Feats". It causes weapons to hit as though one size category larger. The next one up, Elite Weapon Mastery, gives an extra crit multiplier.
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Thank_Dog wrote:

2Chlorobutanal wrote:
I think that if you have to argue to convince others about the clarity of something, it's probably not as objectively clear as you think.

No, what it means is that some people just like to be obtuse.

Does this not get really crazy at higher levels? With an +5 longsword you get crit threat on a 11-20, and don't scimitars start even better than that? At epic it would mean you crit threat every time.

I invented a weapon skill tree for fighters, giving maces stunning attacks and etc etc, I allowed fighters and barbarians to use fort instead of will saves at higher levels and called it body over mind.

If by "crazy" you mean "Do high levels fighters do ungodly amounts of damage on most attacks?" then yes. I think that a decent probability of a fighter scoring 4 critical hits in a round puts him on par with a Wizard that casts Meteor Swarm, or a Rogue that does an additional 8d6 of sneak attack damage.

Besides, our group tends to play magic item-lite games, so there aren't exactly a lot of +5 longsword or scimitars floating around. On average high level fighter in our games have about a 14or15-20 crit range all bonuses considered. Plus, we retire characters at 20th level so epic levels are out of the question. I could see where this rule would be problematic if we were playing in the Forgotten Realms where you can't take a liesurely stroll through Shadowdale without tripping over a Deck of Many things, or the corpse of a diety.

I like the idea about adding weapon specific talent trees to a fighter's repetoire, but that seems like way too much work. Anyway, it looks like they're doing that in 4E, which would be a nice feature
Favorite House Rules

Point Blank Range: point blank range extends to your weapon's first range increment (not just 30 ft), whether it be a bow's 100 ft or a dagger's 10 ft, and yes far shot helps.

Death's door house-rule: When a character 'dies' either from dropping to -10 or below, or some other magical means, they have one full round from that point to be restored to health before passing beyond recovery. Kind of like receiving a killing blow, looking down and realizing you don't have a leg anymore, *then* keeling over dead. With dnd magic, its possible to reverse that damage in time if you act quickly.
In essence you could be blasted to -30 by a fireball and if the cleric can react fast enough to heal you for 22 you'll be unconsious, stable, and alive at -8. He probably regenerated the skin from your blackened bones, but hey its magic.
The best house rule in my game, hands down, is pulling a Homer.

If you critically fumble, and in your confirmation roll you get a 20, then you have pulled a Homer and succeeded despite idiocy. So the fighter's axe is slick with blood and when he swings it at the nearest orc it slips out of his hand disarming him, tumbles end over end in a graceful arc over the battlefield causing friend and foe alike to glance up, and then embeds itself between the eyes of the orc leader across the field, scoring a critical hit.

I find this mechanic creates a nice sense of tension and hope at the table. When a one is rolled all the players gather around because they know that there is still a slight chance for a hilarious way out of the situation.
The best house rule in my game, hands down, is pulling a Homer.

:D That sounds like a lot of fun! Love it!

The Piazza A renaissance of the Old Worlds. Where any setting can be explored, any rules system discussed, and any combination of the two brought to life.

House Rules:

1. Every class gets an extra 2 skill points per level, always.

2. Crit fail on an attack, and you open yourself up to AoO.

3. If you use an Action Point on a save roll, and roll a 1, you don't automatically fail.
No craft magic weapons/armour feat.

Weapons and armour become magical by way of who owned them and what heroic deeds have been done with them. So when a PC did something heroic (took out a BBEG, fought off a swarm of bad guys, or just took a heroic beating) they got to roll to see if thier gear improved. The improvement was linked to the deed. So single handedly taking out most of a troll army, would get you a troll bane sword, surviving an epic beating or escaping a massive battle unscathed gets you an armour improvement, ect.

Why do I like it so much? Well all of my PC's magical weapons and armour have names, and memories attached to them. It encourages heroic behavious and links key events and/or histories to personal items.
1. I use a Benny system (awarded for various actions, such as being on time to the game, awesome roleplaying, etc). They are luck tokens that when exchanged during the game, can allow a player to reroll any die roll. At the end of the session, any remaining Bennies can possibly exchanged for XP (5-6 on a d6 awards that player a small bit of XP).

2. A Player Character gains two ability score increases every 4th level, not one.

3. Having a bright campfire adds +3% to the random night encounter chance. (My players don't know about that one)

4. Wilderness Encounter chances are done twice a day (not once per hour). Increase the likelyhood of an encounter by 50% of the numeric value. Ex: 8% hourly increases to 12% daily (15% if they have a fire at night). Roll d12 to determine what hour of day or night the encounter begins.

5. The bad guy always gets his chance to finish his monologue, or else he gets +100 extra HD per interruption. :P
5. The bad guy always gets his chance to finish his monologue, or else he gets +100 extra HD per interruption.

Best......House Rule.......EVER!!!
1. All monsters in my campaign have max hit points.

2. All player HD rolls less than half are rerolled.

3. No cross class skills.

4. Spell points system, no vancian casting.

5. Metamagic feats increase spell point cost and require a spellcraft check or the spell fails and the points are lost.

These are my favorite house rules in use. There are many more as my game is heavily modified from core.

I already know 1 & 2 will remain in effect in 4e. The rest will depend.
1. Characters die at -10 minus level. (Ex. A 7th level character dies at -17).

2. Save or Die effects reduce a character to -1 hp and he begins dying (lose 1 hp per round).

3. Raise Dead & Resurrection restricted. True Resurrection removed.
1. Hit Dice are always at least half (if you roll a 3 on a d10, it counts as a 5, for example).

2. Free multiclassing (no favored classes).

3. Orcs (and orc-blooded races like half-orcs) get Toughness for free at 1st level, and again at every multiple of 5 (5th, 10th etc.).
well, it used to be the crit now that is core,
then it would be heal spells that scale with level now that is core too
next would be DR (i called it 'skin') that is well.....
so i suppose the 'last act' is it. if you get dropped below 0 you get a 'last act' to save yourself or in a fit of spite go for the crit on whoever did you in
keeps player death down but not eleminated and encourages some conserving of resources
Stacking criticals: If, when rolling to confirm a critical hit, you naturally roll within the critical threat range of your weapon again (and this is also high enough to confirm the critical hit), you get to roll again to try to confirm for a higher critical. If that succeeds, you add 1 to the damage multiplier.

This can, theoretically, go on forever. It rarely goes very high, but it means that theoretically any attack could cause enough damage to kill anything. The odds might be astronomically high against, say, killing a dragon with a dagger, but it's kind of possible.
Sorcerers get Eschew Materials as a bonus feat at first level. But it only works for Sorcerer spells gained in that class. A wizard wich sorcerer levels still got the bonus feat but it would only work on the magic he casts from his sorcerer levels. Since the magic is basicaly the same, but it comes from a bit different personal powers, so a wizard cannot cast a spell of her sorcerer levels and prepare it as a wizard. however, knowing the same spell (having it into the spellbook AND known) can be prepared without a spellbook as thought the wizard in question had the "Spell mastery" feat aplied for that spell.

Magic Healing: a Healing potion (bought of crafted) by a caster with the caster level set two levels higher has for minimun to being cast (example: a Cure Ligth Wounds potion at 3th caster level) can automaticaly stabilaze a character whose hitpoints are not lower than -5. (no roll necesary) this also aplies to magic but only if casted out of combat. While out of combat, if the spell can actually get you to 1 HP, it automaticaly does (instead of rolling) the casting takes a full round action and the caster has to be under complete concentration. (to take account of time)

Chrystal Spellbook: For certain campaing settings, a Wizard may perform certain tasks that allow her to avoid the use of a spellbook. Instead, for every spell level, the wizard uses a different chrystal. The Chrystal doesn't have a limit on what number of spells can it store, but it can only store spells of a specefic level. Higher level chrystals are harder to get of course. The spells from a chrystal abide by all the normal rules of a spellbook: spellcraft DC for copying, borrowing, interpreting etc etc. The Chrystal has a hardness of 10 and 2 HP + 1 HP per Chrystal level. Epic level Chrystals are a rare kind of chrystals forged by two 9th level Chrystals... long process... but not that difficult. you get the point XD

Nat 1 on attack roll has a d10 of thing that could happen, many already explained earlier, like a weapon recieving damage, falling from the Character's hands, etc etc. A different list for a different session. (or campaing) I have like five of them (that way, its truly random XD)

There are more, but those are my favourites.
1. Polymorph spells are one level higher.

2. Sorcerer spell progression skips level 2.

3. Druids must take the Shapeshift variant from Players Handbook II

4. Divine Metamagic cannot boost a spell's level past the maximum spell level you can cast.

5. If you're a major antagonist, you're allowed to fudge your build. My current campaign has a sorceress gish who took two levels of palamonk.

6. Antagonists cheat and get more actions per round.
The best 3.x group I ever played with had a guy who houseruled all the Skills and base classes (as well as a small handful of Feats) into Proficiencies which were then taken at High or Low (5 of each; BAB and hit die advancemtent were also separate Proficiencies). When you needed a Skill check, your check was either Ability (d20 + appropriate stat mod) or Level (Ability + level number) depending on your Proficiencies. There were no gained Feats. While this sounds awful in theory, the way it played out was astounding.

I had a 1st level character with nearly all of the Rogue proficiencies except that I traded the theiving skills (which would then only increase if I upped my DEX) for the warlock's eldritch blast at about half growth speed. Every level, I picked up all my necessary Rogue evasion-type bonuses as if I had a level of rogue and then half a level of warlock. This was great since I was playing a character who had been driven from his village Frankenstein-style due to his warlock heritage and had been on the run for over a year. We had a paladin who traded his mount for a third of a clerical casting level for each paladin level, making him a very useful fellow indeed.

It turns out that most of the core 3E Feats could be covered by allowing charcacters to dabble more freely in each other's classes; we barely felt the loss. Plus, stuff from the Complete Series was open to use in what he called "Prestige Proficiencies" which you could pick up every 6 levels or so. Wish I could've continues with them. Great stuff.
Clerics start with light armor proficiency instead of heavy.

Fighters and Paladins start with medium armor instead of heavy. Can spend a feat to go heavy early. Both classes get heavy armor for free at 5th level, allowing them to select a new feat if they've advanced that far.

Monks add their Wisdom bonus to bare-hand damage dealt for the purposes of bypassing damage absorption. (More of an issue in 3.0).

If you pick a feat, then later get that same feat for "free" from a class, you can pick any feat available to you in its place. The same applies if two classes (e.g. Rogue, Monk and Shadowdancer) all provide you the same feat.

No class-based alignment-restrictions, except for Paladins/Blackguards.

Paladin/Blackguard aura can't grant more +'s than your class level.

"Extra spell slot" feats grant the highest level spell slot you can cast, and grow with you. (If epic, that's 9th level.) You do not have a "worse" feat because you picked up an extra spell slot at 3rd level vs someone who picked it at 18th.

Can do quests to get around stat requirements for some feats.

Temporarily lose the most recent feat you picked up for 5 days after a resurrection. Must be a selected feat, not a free-class feat.
1) Hit point rolls of '1' are rerolled.
2) A natural '20' with confirm uses critical chart. A natural '1' with miss uses fumble chart.
3) +1 AC for every 4 BAB
4) You die at -(10+Con bonus)

-Kirk
2 small favs of mine:

a) Making an Attack of Opportunity draws an attack of opportunity
(based off seeing how live melee combat works...best time to strike a guy is when he's hitting someone else. Especially if it's a Not On Your Turn snapshot)

b) Rounding following proper math procedures. (i.e. remainders of 0.5+ are rounded up)
House Rules:

1. Every class gets an extra 2 skill points per level, always.

2. Crit fail on an attack, and you open yourself up to AoO.

3. If you use an Action Point on a save roll, and roll a 1, you don't automatically fail.

Love the crit fail = AoO. Thinking of using it straight away.

My favourite house rule is "wild" damage and healing rolls. Any roll for damage or healing that comes up maximum for the dice gets a re-roll added to it. If you roll a maximum on the next roll you keep rolling and adding. Yes, we even do this for fireballs, cure serious wounds and other big damage / healing effects.

We love this rule and have played it since 2E, and will probably play it in 4E if it is compatable. It makes for the fast and deadly combat we like and means the PCs never take any opponent for granted because any attack can be lethal (like the 20-20-20 roll rule). It also reduces the benefits of bigger weapons slightly.

I doubt this house rule would suit most games. The down-sides for many players would be more liklely PC deaths, suprising changes of fortune in combat, and two ways to get "critical" hits being confusing.

However, the impact on the game of these rules is not as great as you would guess. Average damage from weapons is only marginally higher. I haven't done the calculations recently, but I think the average damage for a weapon rises by less than a point (eg: for a d4 from 2.5 to just under 3.5, and for a d10 from 5.5 to just under 6.25).