4E crunch: Paladin Smites

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Reposted from the Dragon Forum, because nobody there seemed interested.

Finally, we have some good solid crunch on 4E (courtesy of the Paladin Smites article). So what have we learned?


Now a subset of the paladin's renewable (read, encounter-recharge) powers, smites allow a paladin to deliver a powerful blow with the character's weapon of choice, while layering on some divine effect

Smites are per-encounter abilities, and are weapon-dependant. It’s unclear how “weapon of choice” will be determined, whether it is fixed or fluid (ie. can you choose "mace" when you have a mace, then choose "longsword" when you pick one up) and whether “unarmed” will be a viable choice.


A divine defender

Self-explanatory and not very surprising, but at least now we have confirmation.


Attack: Charisma vs. AC

It will be possible in the core rules to make attack roles using ability scores other than Strength or Dexterity. I’m not sure how this meshes with WotC’s stated goal of simplifying combat and minimising on-the-spot calculations, but there you go.


Hit or Miss: An ally within 5 squares gains a bonus to AC equal to your Wisdom modifier until the end of your next turn.

It will be possible to gain benefits even when you miss. This supports the earlier podcast talking about fighters doing damage even when they miss, but confirms that the mechanic of “miss but do something” will be available to at least 2 classes.


Though this splash of leader flavor into the paladin's defender role comes in many forms

This suggests that the new defender, striker, leader, controller roles are not straight-jackets and there might be some room for classes to inhabit more than one role. It’s been bothering me that wizards might lose their pride of place in the ‘blaster’ stakes, but this gives me hope that wizards will still be reliable blasters.


Encounter • Healing, Weapon

This smite has different descriptors than the earlier model. Note that the healing descriptor has been added. Perhaps there will be a limit on encounter abilities based on type, in addition to or instead of a simple maximum (Eg. The paladin might get 2 healing and 2 weapon abilities per encounter, rather than simply getting 4 per encounter), or perhaps there will be ways to augment abilities based on type (eg. "The bands of the hero allow you to reroll all dice associated with a Weapon ability but you must accept the results of the new roll").


Hit: 2x[W] + Wis damage and target cannot gain line of effect to anyone but you until the end of your next turn.

Line of effect is still a mechanic.

Depending on how many times per encounter Binding Smite can be used, this is an amazingly powerful ability in a group setting. It allows the party to reliably focus their healing and buffs on one party member, and guarantees that that party member is a defender with (presumably) good armour and hp. Given that high-level critters in 3E can easily pulp spellcasters in less than a full-attack (and assuming that risk is not going to disappear), it’s easy to see why this might represent the pinnacle of smites.

Anything I've missed?

P.S. Please keep this thread for discussion of what we have learned from the article, not whether you like the direction or the mechanics. There's already another thread for that.
It will be possible in the core rules to make attack roles using ability scores other than Strength or Dexterity. I’m not sure how this meshes with WotC’s stated goal of simplifying combat and minimising on-the-spot calculations, but there you go.

This also seems to confirm that ability mods are equal to:

lvl/2 + ability bonus + misc

Otherwise an attack ability vs AC would make no sense.

So we can assume that most skill checks can be replaced by ability checks, and you can get a bonus to certain ability checks in certain circumstances. That's what I call back to the roots!

Hm, other explanation would be: A Cha Attack is your BAB + Cha Bonus, but this would be a little complicated...
Ceterum censeo scrinium puniceum esse delendam
maybe there is no BAB anymore and no base skill bonus, no base armor bonus, instead of that, your 4e stat bonuses are:

stat bonus = (stat+level-11)/2

then each single point in an stat and each level is worthwile and your charisma attack is just:

charisma attack = d20 + stat bonus (which depends on level) + fixed bonuses derived from class.

No ad hoc calculations, a level depending mechanic, a perfect (but maybe wrong) explanation for the spined devil stats listed.
stat bonus = (stat+level-11)/2

I don't think they would use (stat + level - 11) /2,

but would stick to
bonus = frd(lvl/2) + stat bonus similar to SAGA
which is equal to frd(lvl/2) + frd(stat /2) - 5
which is almost equal to (stat + level - 11) /2 besides some rounding differences.
Ceterum censeo scrinium puniceum esse delendam
Smites are per-encounter abilities, and are weapon-dependant. It’s unclear how “weapon of choice” will be determined, whether it is fixed or fluid (ie. can you choose "mace" when you have a mace, then choose "longsword" when you pick one up) and whether “unarmed” will be a viable choice.

I think he just meant that you do damage based on whatever weapon you have. So, if you have a Longsword you do double damage of that, and if you have a Flaming Holy Greatsword +6 you do double damage of that, etc. I don't think it's a fixed decision that you make like Weapon Focus.
Hit or Miss: An ally within 5 squares gains a bonus to AC equal to your Wisdom modifier until the end of your next turn.

I've loved almost everything I've seen so far, but I have to say, this is the first thing that I've seen about 4e that makes me want to puke.

The paladin attacks an enemy, and some ally 25 feet away is suddenly harder to hit by anyone on the battlefield? What in the Nine Hells is THAT all about?

I'm starting to see more hints of these "apples & oranges" special attacks and I have to say I think they're the stupidest thing I've ever heard of.

What next?

The cleric scores a crit and the whole party gets a cure light wounds?
The rogue backstabs someone and the wizard's next spell is at +2 to attack?
The warlock crits on a spell and one foe within five squares of the target is struck blind?
The warlord reduces his opponent to negative hit points and the ranger's quiver suddenly refills with arrows?

Okay, so maybe I'm exaggerating with my examples, but really, tell me how the DM is supposed to narrate the given example? How does "willful suspension of disbelief" allow a player to imagine such an effect happening?

Personally, I think these sorts of attacks should be limited to self-only or target-only. Give the paladin a smite that improves THEIR AC, not someone standing 25' away! Or an attack that reduces their opponent's AC, not some random foe who's not even within their reach! I could imagine a smite where on a successful hit/crit/kill all foes within three squares have to make a save versus fear (or whatever the 4e mechanic is) or spend their next move action moving away from the paladin.

But please, let's not allow these unrealistic (even for a fantasy game) "apples & oranges" effects.
I'm starting to see more hints of these "apples & oranges" special attacks and I have to say I think they're the stupidest thing I've ever heard of.

I was going to say the same thing.

I like the idea of successful smites generating interesting effects beyond +X to damage. But I'm still seeing this fundamental disconnect where a rule exists without any clear explanation of what's happening in the game world.

My example of choise is the binding smite: "Hit: 2x[W] + Wis damage and target cannot gain line of effect to anyone but you until the end of your next turn."

What does that mean, exactly? What is the paladin doing, exactly, that prevents the enemy from gaining a line of effect to anyone else?

The renewing smite has a similar problem. Here I can come up with an explanation that makes sense: For a paladin, his martial skills are a rite offered up to his god. So when he strikes with his chosen weapon, it's no different than a cleric calling upon his god -- and the paladin can manifest that faith in the form of healing for his allies in combat.

The safeguard smite hadn't bugged me before, because I hadn't noticed the range involved. I mean, I could see granting an ally within your threatened area an AC bonus (because you're using your smite to actively defend them). I could also see inflicting a penalty to the next attack of the guy I'm smiting (my smite has knocked them off balance, distracted them, whatever). But, again, I've got no clue how to describe what happened when the paladin smites Enemy A and Ally B -- fighting somebody else entirely 25 feet away and completely out of my reach -- suddenly becomes more difficult to hit. I guess maybe some kind of blessing or divine shield?

But the point is that I shouldn't have to be struggling to come up with this kind of explanation. These explanations should flow obviously from the mechanics themselves.

And it's not just this one article: I first became aware of this problem when Mike Mearls redesigned the 3rd Edition rust monster. The current design crew at WotC apparently just don't care whether or not a mechanic makes any sense in terms of the game world.

For me, however, this will make the game virtually unplayable. In an RPG numbers should mean things -- not just be mathematical probability games.

Of course, the binding smite is also an example of why I don't actually believe anything that WotC or their designers are saying about 4th Edition. I mean, I don't want to call them blatant liars, but it was literally only days ago that Mike Mearls posted to the boards and swore that aggro mechanics had been tested, found wanting, and removed from the game.

And yet here we are: The binding smite is clearly an aggro mechanic. It clearly tells you who you can attack and who you can't attack. And it clearly hasn't been removed from the game.

Justin Alexander
http://www.thealexandrian.net
And yet, this article could be months old. We don't know at what stage it was written.
The safeguard smite hadn't bugged me before, because I hadn't noticed the range involved. I mean, I could see granting an ally within your threatened area an AC bonus (because you're using your smite to actively defend them). I could also see inflicting a penalty to the next attack of the guy I'm smiting (my smite has knocked them off balance, distracted them, whatever). But, again, I've got no clue how to describe what happened when the paladin smites Enemy A and Ally B -- fighting somebody else entirely 25 feet away and completely out of my reach -- suddenly becomes more difficult to hit. I guess maybe some kind of blessing or divine shield?

25 feet IS NOT A LONG DISTANCE ON A BATTLEFIELD. Geez, I've said this a million times. Assuming you're doing an 8-to-5 step (marching band reference), 25 feet is about 13-14 steps. Most people have a natural stride greater than an 8-to-5 step, so it's more like 10 steps on average.

10 steps. Not so unreasonable a distance.

But the point is that I shouldn't have to be struggling to come up with this kind of explanation. These explanations should flow obviously from the mechanics themselves.

Funny, because I came up with explanations for all three of the example smites on a whim as soon as I read the article. I just have a better imagination than you.
What can I say? The absurdity of my comrade getting healed becasue he saw me hit an enemy really hard is beyond words to describe. 4E is quickly transforming from quicksand to a black hole.
You guys DO know that this has already been done, right? It's called Tome of Battle.

In any case, it's very clear to me that the people complaining about the paladin smites just don't get it.
Damage is not always nicks and scratches, it can be flavourfull, it could be losing morale as the opponent slowly starts beating all your defences or what not. And the Devoted Spirit discipline is all "Wow, see how hard he hit that guy? I'm so getting back up there." Rather than hitting someone so hard positive energy flows into your buddies.

Of course all that is rooted since you have to beat someones AC, which is overcoming all armor and defences, to deal damage, but still, its nice to add a spin to things.
I agree with Lokathor in that 'weapon based' probably was only refering to the damage dealt.

Only other amusing thing I thought of is "Does blinding strike mean the target loses line of effect to itself as well?" At 27th level I could see it being either way, but the ambiguity was amusing. :D
Well... At least we got custom avatars....
And the Devoted Spirit discipline is all "Wow, see how hard he hit that guy? I'm so getting back up there." Rather than hitting someone so hard positive energy flows into your buddies.

Or instead of the positive energy overflow theory, it's more the deity acting in more than one place simultaneously, with the paladin thinking along the lines of "(Bahamut) protect us and guide my blade."

And who's to say that the ally that got healed or protected will think anything more than "wow, look at that hit." If that ally isn't a believer in the paladin's deity, he could be thinking that, and then also happen to notice that he feels stronger, or perhaps inspired in some way.

If the ally IS a believer, he could see the paladin as a veritable avatar of his deity, and feel inspired that way.
I agree with Lokathor in that 'weapon based' probably was only refering to the damage dealt.

Only other amusing thing I thought of is "Does blinding strike mean the target loses line of effect to itself as well?" At 27th level I could see it being either way, but the ambiguity was amusing. :D

And keep the enemy from healing or buffing himself? Sure, why not? It is epic level, after all.
I don't agree with your assessment Radazim, but this was funny.

The warlord reduces his opponent to negative hit points and the ranger's quiver suddenly refills with arrows?

:heehee

At any rate, I don't have a problem with this. Also I wouldn't look at hit points as requiring an actual hit. It can be representing as a near miss and a lot of sweating with the final blow that kills a character being displayed as a hit.

I don't think hitting your opponent and giving your ally hp is bad, although hitting an opponent and giving him AC can be hard to keep a track of.
Boo on the agro drawing mechanics. Wowafication ftl.

But I'm down with the other Smites.
25 feet IS NOT A LONG DISTANCE ON A BATTLEFIELD. Geez, I've said this a million times. Assuming you're doing an 8-to-5 step (marching band reference), 25 feet is about 13-14 steps. Most people have a natural stride greater than an 8-to-5 step, so it's more like 10 steps on average.

10 steps. Not so unreasonable a distance.

Okay, describe it to me. I'm standing 25 feet away from you. What are you doing, EXACTLY, to protect me from the guy standing 5 feet away from me and whacking on me?

Keep in mind that (a) you can't move any closer to me than you are now and (b) you're actually hitting somebody else.

Funny, because I came up with explanations for all three of the example smites on a whim as soon as I read the article. I just have a better imagination than you.

Funny that you are apparently incapable of actually providing such descriptions. You get a 1 on the Troll-o-meter.
Okay, describe it to me. I'm standing 25 feet away from you. What are you doing, EXACTLY, to protect me from the guy standing 5 feet away from me and whacking on me?

Keep in mind that (a) you can't move any closer to me than you are now and (b) you're actually hitting somebody else.

Umm, hello? Did you miss the part where paladins are DIVINE defenders? Please don't tell me you need me to explain what divine entails in this game.

Funny that you are apparently incapable of actually providing such descriptions. You get a 1 on the Troll-o-meter.

Funny, because I just did a few posts up, as well as in several different threads on the same topic. Funny that you are apparently incapable of reading an entire thread before putting your foot in your mouth.

And the only "trolls" here are those that whine about things they obviously don't understand.
You guys DO know that this has already been done, right? It's called Tome of Battle.

In any case, it's very clear to me that the people complaining about the paladin smites just don't get it.

It is even earlier than that. Look at 3.0 and Shield Other.

Example for those still amazed at the smite and rider affecting people at a distance.

Shield Other -- 3.0

My character is standing way over here and yet I am helping my friend who is standing way over there. I am even feeling pain when my friend who is way over there is getting hit despite me standing way over here.

Wow, it is amazing how magic can do that sort of thing.
The binding strike at LVL 27 is no means an aggro mechanic. Its a simple taunt, which existed in some form in each edition. (Kender 1st and 2nd/ Harlekin 2nd/knight? 3rd edition)

It is an encounter ability vs will defence, which forces an opponent to concentrate on you in one round...

the other effects would be much more believable if all allies would benefit, becaus you could call it an aura then, which was present in ADnD and 3.X in some way. The just one ally however really is strange... also the measurement in squares...
Okay, describe it to me. I'm standing 25 feet away from you. What are you doing, EXACTLY, to protect me from the guy standing 5 feet away from me and whacking on me?

Keep in mind that (a) you can't move any closer to me than you are now and (b) you're actually hitting somebody else.

Jimmy Wizard and Joe Paladin are standing 25 feet apart, each in melee with a viscious orc. Joe Paladin calls upon the powers of his god and smites the orc he is fighting. A great divine fury is unleashed cleaving the orc in two.

The orc battling Jimmy Wizard becomes quite concerned about the divine fury which just slaughtered his companion, and so, his next attack is weaker than normal?

Upon seeing the favor of the gods as personified by Joe Paladin, Jimmy Wizard gains confidence in his defenses and can better ward off blows?

Joe Paladin got the attention of his god by calling down a smite, and said god decides to divinely protect Joe Paladin's less martial-worthy compatriot?

Joe Paladin got the attention of the orc's god who temporarily curses the remaining orc since the orcs were a failure in battle?

Luck is often not controlled by random chance but rather by how good your allies are?
> The binding strike at LVL 27 is no means an aggro mechanic. Its a simple
> taunt, which existed in some form in each edition.

It's not even a taunt. It could just as easily be "I'm getting in the way of your attempt to target my ally, nyah nyah!"

Moreover, it doesn't actually force the subject to attack the paladin, or otherwise directly control the subject's choice of actions - and if the subject has an attack form which does not require LoE, it can still use that against other creatures than the paladin.
Umm, hello? Did you miss the part where paladins are DIVINE defenders? Please don't tell me you need me to explain what divine entails in this game.

... why the heck were you arguing about the distance in paces if you were just going to invoke "inexplicable and poorly defined power of the gods" as your explanation? If it had been 16 paces instead of "13-15" would the gods not have been able to intervene?

Moreover, it doesn't actually force the subject to attack the paladin, or otherwise directly control the subject's choice of actions - and if the subject has an attack form which does not require LoE, it can still use that against other creatures than the paladin.

It's pretty weak when you're claiming that an ability which prevents the target from taking a large swath of potential actions doesn't "directly control the subject's choice of actions". What tortured definition of "control" are you using, exactly, to make such an absurd claim?

Justin Alexander
http://www.thealexandrian.net
Okay, describe it to me. I'm standing 25 feet away from you. What are you doing, EXACTLY, to protect me from the guy standing 5 feet away from me and whacking on me?

Keep in mind that (a) you can't move any closer to me than you are now and (b) you're actually hitting somebody else.

Hmm, how can I help someone magically when they are standing 25 feet from me when I mutter a prayer???

Let's open the 3.5 PHB to level 0 spells.

I find Guidance grants a bonus to attacks, saves, and skills
I find Resistance grants a +1 on saves

Let's move to level 1

I find Bless and Bane that affect attack rolls and fear saves
I find Doom that affects attack rolls
I find Remove Fear that gives +4 to saves

There are also touch range defensive shield spells like divine favour, entropic shield, and shield of faith that provide protection. If you are willing to allow the spells like Bless to work at range then I see no reason why these spells could not be used at range. The only thing that would be the modifiers of +Metamagic feat to make these spells work at range modified by a -Metamagic feat because these benefits last only a single round.

I could go on to levels 2 through 9 of each of the different magical lists but I think you can see the pattern.

Further, I would direct the court to look at Divine Feats like in the Complete Divine book.

Here they have taken the Clerical power to Turn Undead and allowed it to;
Replace levels in Metamagic Feats
Spontaneously cast a Domain Spell
Heal allies with a Fast Heal 3
Align Weapons for overcoming Damage Reduction
Grant a +3 saving throw

Allowing Smite to do a bit more does not seem to break anything in the way the rules are working in 3.5 much less in how people are playing the game.
Would it be less "aggro mechanic" or "WoWization" if it instead of saying "the enemy cannot gain line of effect" it said "the enemy is affected as if under a dominate monster spell for one round"? I grant that the second option is WAY more powerful (and so would be useful in 3.5 epic), but it is almost the same.

You hit the critter, and it cannot "think straight" or it gets so ticked off that it can only think of getting back at you or whatever.
For one round.
For one enemy.
Once per encounter.

I think it works much better than a 3.5 paladin trying to drive the {Advanced Dragon/Winterwight/Demilich} away from the party wizard and the only option he has is doing enough damage to the thing to 1-hit-kill it, or else the wizard is dust.
Yeah, so much for an actual discussion of what this article tells us like the OP was looking for. There are plenty of threads that have been started in order to critique and criticize the smites. Another redundant thread (read: flame war) is a lot less interesting to me than actually discussing the mechanics we've been shown and what they tell us about the mechanics of the game overall.
You guys DO know that this has already been done, right? It's called Tome of Battle.

In any case, it's very clear to me that the people complaining about the paladin smites just don't get it.

Yes, and that part of Tome of Battle is equally hard to stomach. If you can convince me that if the wizard hits someone with a magic missile (or something similar) a pink elephant should fall out of the sky and land on an enemy 25 ft away, then I will buy the concept of "Hey, Alllastar the paladin hit that guy really hard, and all of the sudden the gash on my chest healed up." They are both equally disconnected and absurd.
The "Charisma vs. AC" is a funny mechanic. It makes me think that the Paladin is doing something flashy with his weapon rather than making a normal attack.

The [W] indicating weapon damage. Is this a stand in for a glyph or do you think that we will really see "[W]" in our PHBs? What all do you think is included in "base weapon damage"? If it is just the weapon's damage dice than the smites aren't that powerful, nor they seem to scale.
The "Charisma vs. AC" is a funny mechanic. It makes me think that the Paladin is doing something flashy with his weapon rather than making a normal attack.

The [W] indicating weapon damage. Is this a stand in for a glyph or do you think that we will really see "[W]" in our PHBs? What all do you think is included in "base weapon damage"? If it is just the weapon's damage dice than the smites aren't that powerful, nor they seem to scale.

My guess is "weapon damage" refers to the damage you would deal on a standard attack. The [W] is shorthand, and I'm assuming we'll see it in the PHB as-is, much like the [D] for dismissable spells in 3.X.

As for the "Charisma vs. AC" idea, I see that as the paladin calling out to his god, who guides the blade. It works like the standard smite in 3.5, mostly.
Rhymes with Bruce
My guess is "weapon damage" refers to the damage you would deal on a standard attack. The [W] is shorthand, and I'm assuming we'll see it in the PHB as-is, much like the [D] for dismissable spells in 3.X.

As for the "Charisma vs. AC" idea, I see that as the paladin calling out to his god, who guides the blade. It works like the standard smite in 3.5, mostly.

It wasn't "[D]" it was "(D)", the brackets vs. the parenthesis make a difference.

If you have noticed as I have when WoTC wish to include a specific printer's mark in the text (such as a superscript or multiplication symbol) and put it on the web, you get the bracketed notation for the glyph ([A] or [ts]).

I wouldn't be surprised if [W] was like when it was printed in the book.
The [W] indicating weapon damage. Is this a stand in for a glyph or do you think that we will really see "[W]" in our PHBs? What all do you think is included in "base weapon damage"? If it is just the weapon's damage dice than the smites aren't that powerful, nor they seem to scale.

This is an interesting observation; the same question about how damage scales had occurred to me as well. I'm guessing that there will be a level-based modifier, much like with defenses and BAB, or that there will be a class-based bonus to "base weapon damage."
Yes, and that part of Tome of Battle is equally hard to stomach. If you can convince me that if the wizard hits someone with a magic missile (or something similar) a pink elephant should fall out of the sky and land on an enemy 25 ft away, then I will buy the concept of "Hey, Alllastar the paladin hit that guy really hard, and all of the sudden the gash on my chest healed up." They are both equally disconnected and absurd.

Love the obtuse analogy. Really.
The "Charisma vs. AC" is a funny mechanic. It makes me think that the Paladin is doing something flashy with his weapon rather than making a normal attack.

Actually, Logan Bonner has said that characters will use the ability they should be strong at when using class abilities and such.

So I guess it could be reasoned (for those that must have an "explainable" way for things to work) that the smites are guided by the paladin's force of personality, or something.

Also, one interesting thing is that Wisdom will still be a secondary stat for paladins, although it doesn't look like he'll be casting spells.
Add me to the apples and oranges are ridiculous bandwagon. I don't know how that is making the game simpler.
(reposted from a different thread)

I'm curious.

If the healing smite allows the paladin to heal damage when I hit or miss an opponent, could the paladin attack one of his allies using a weapon he's not proficient with or doesnt do much damage with (an unarmed strike for example,) miss "on purpose" or barely deal damage and use that to heal?


Cleric: I'm out of healing power; you need to start punching me if we're going to survive.
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The only conceivable reason for doing so would be if the paladin could not reach an opponent.

I imagine there will be a rule that requires the target of a power to present a threat.

Also I believe out of combat healing will have rules that make using a healing smite out of combat to be as silly in a rules context as it is in concept.
So the paladin yells, "By the power of Bahamut, our cause is righteous! Take heart Galorian, we shall prevail!"

While he does this his sword might or might not glow with the divine power of his god or cause.

Galorian might feel the blessing of Bahamut as the demon the paladin fights is smote, but he might just as well take heart, draw on his reserves and regain HP or refresh his tired defenses, inspired by the might of the paladin battling at his side.

This really seems to work for me and brings some life, dynamism, and role playing opportunity to the table.

And I think its a complete failure of imagination to say that dealing damage and healing or buffing an ally just doesn't make sense.
Actually, Logan Bonner has said that characters will use the ability they should be strong at when using class abilities and such.

So I guess it could be reasoned (for those that must have an "explainable" way for things to work) that the smites are guided by the paladin's force of personality, or something.

Also, one interesting thing is that Wisdom will still be a secondary stat for paladins, although it doesn't look like he'll be casting spells.

The benefit of Charisma to Smite is not new. It is how it worked in 3.0. Smite gave a bonus to attack and represented the Paladin's connection to the Divine and the guiding hand of the divine in hitting the target.

Similar benefits have been Sorcerer, Cleric, and Wizards DC of spells were based upon the relavent attribute. Dexterity often helped Rogues when they lobbed knives at the flanks of targets for additional damage.

This is really a cleaning up of some things like a Sorcerer having to have both a good Charisma to increase the DC of spells, a good intelligence to get bonus spells, and a good dexterity to cast ray spells. Really all these magical things are connected and should need just one attribute to make them work well instead of several (The way it was in the rules, the Sorcerer got penalized for having Charisma operate the spells compared to a Wizard which I am pretty sure was not the original intention of the developers).
Sorcerers used intelligence for bonus spells?
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Sorcerers used intelligence for bonus spells?

I could be wrong, but I'm pretty sure that casters use the relevant ability score for bonus spells: intelligence for wizards and beguilers; wisdom for clerics, druids, and paladins, and charisma for bards and sorcerers.
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