experience in 4e

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I haven't seen much in the way of rules for experience in fourth edition, so I thought I'd toss this out there for the masses.

Will we need more or less xp to level than in 3e?
Will monsters give a standard ammount of xp, like 2e, or scaling xp as in 3e?
Will there be standard 'story awards'?
Will there be standard role-playing awards (like the optional system in 2e DMG)?
etc.

I have seen the thread on xp for gp, but unless it starts taking a lot longer to level than it did in 3e, I think this is out of the question, as everyone would level way too fast. Perhaps xp for magic items found, as in (old) basic D&D?

Discuss! (but please keep it friendly)
Will we need more or less xp to level than in 3e?
Will monsters give a standard ammount of xp, like 2e, or scaling xp as in 3e?
Will there be standard 'story awards'?
Will there be standard role-playing awards (like the optional system in 2e DMG)?

We don't know the scaling or mechanics yet, but in effect it will be more. WotC has said that characters will go from 1-30 in the time they go from 1-20 now.

I expect xp will be scaled for difficulty some how. I would like it to be tweaked so that the fall off for fighting something below your level is fairly harsh but the extra reward for something above your level isn't so high.

I expect story awards of some sort will be standard rather then a nearly universal option, but role-playing awards are a toss up. The problem with role-playing awards is that they are very subjective, to the point it is hard to be fair with them.

Jay
I hate scaling experience. The amount of experience needed to go up a level is already scaled. It shouldn't have to be scaled twice. Besides, I hate having to consult tables.
In the podcast where he was asked to make an encounter for level X on the fly (did it twice) he kept mumbling to himself something about how much experience the encounter totaled to. It makes me think that EXP is fixed, and encounter level can be scaled by adding or removing a monster (or two) of the right XP value to go up or down a level.
I hate scaling experience. The amount of experience needed to go up a level is already scaled. It shouldn't have to be scaled twice. Besides, I hate having to consult tables.

Same here. I would like to see a fixed ammount of xp for monsters, but maybe that's just my nostalgia.
Same here. I would like to see a fixed ammount of xp for monsters, but maybe that's just my nostalgia.

Have you checked out the UA variant?
Yes, I have, thanks. It's a decent system.
I hate scaling experience. The amount of experience needed to go up a level is already scaled. It shouldn't have to be scaled twice. Besides, I hate having to consult tables.

I agree with you here. Experience should not be scaled twice. This said, I think the experience required to gain a level should be fixed, whereas the experience gained from facing a challenge should vary according to your level of experience.
I agree with you here. Experience should not be scaled twice. This said, I think the experience required to gain a level should be fixed, whereas the experience gained from facing a challenge should vary according to your level of experience.

Then don't scale it twice. Just scale the experience for the challenge you overcame. Instead of awarding a number award a percentage point. When they hit 100% they level. (This is theory behind MMORPGs have gone to displaying bars being filled by default, hiding the numbers unless you look for them).

The reason they scale the number required per level is so its a bit easier to manage, what happens with overcap experience. It also implys to the recipiant that killing the dragon at level 20 was more rewarding than killing the goblin at level 1, despite it rewarding the same 5% you needed to reach the next level.

Putting all of the math into one side of the equation doesn't reduce the number of operations you need to do to sove the problem though.
If they really want to simplify experience, they can just do it this way:

A character needs 1,000 XP to advance to the next level. A level 1 character needs 1,000 XP in total to reach level 2, then 2,000 XP total for level 3, 3,000 XP total to reach level 4, etc. This way, it is easy to know how much XP you need to reach any given level.

Each monster or challenge has a certain XP value. The amount of XP awarded is divided by the number of PC's in the party and by the level of the PC. A party of 4, level 5 PC's complete an encounter. The total XP for the encounter is 1,000. Each PC gets 1,000 / 4 / 5 = 50 XP. If the PC's were level 10 instead, each PC would get 1,000 / 4 / 10 = 25 XP.

This way, you don't have to look up stuff in tables. All you need to know is division. When designing challenges, you just need a set value for the challenge.
<\ \>tuntman
A character needs 1,000 XP to advance to the next level. A level 1 character needs 1,000 XP in total to reach level 2, then 2,000 XP total for level 3, 3,000 XP total to reach level 4, etc. This way, it is easy to know how much XP you need to reach any given level.

They already do it like that. Reset your EXP to 0 every time you level and you'll see it clearly. Eg, 1->2 = 1,000 EXP, 2->3 = 2,000 EXP (3,000normal-1,000 that you already earned), and so on. My group has done it this way for a year and it also letes you convey your level at the same time "I'm at 2,500 out of 3,000" means you're also a 3rd level character."

If you want to remove all tables also remember the following information:
`For encounters 1 level below a player, they get 200*CR EXP.
`For encounters the same level as the player, they get 300*CR EXP.
`For encounters 1 level above a player, they get 400*CR EXP.
`For other lower CRs, if the CR+2 CR is one of the 3 possible values above then it's half the value you compute using said above value, repeat the math for very low level foes.
`For other higher CRs, if the CR-2 is one of the 3 possible values above then it's twice the value you compute, repeat the math for very low level foes.
`In all cases, divide the single person award computed by the number of people on his side before awarding it to that person

So using those 5 little bits, you can compute what any level person should get at any level. Said information is listed out in the Epic Level Handbook using much more eloquent wording, but you get the idea.
I didn't think there was a problem with the way experience is done in 3.5 now, so I really don't think anything needs to change. Its a fairly straight forward system, only getting slightly more complicated for a DM when there are staggered levels of player characters, but beyond that its easysauce. My 2 cents.