What is a Full Blade sword?

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What is a Full Blade sword?
I've seen bastards, claymores, long swords, short swords, etc. But I was told a Full Blade sword does more damage, and that's it.
Pictures will help deeply.
What is a Full Blade sword?
I've seen bastards, claymores, long swords, short swords, etc. But I was told a Full Blade sword does more damage, and that's it.
Pictures will help deeply.

Eh, think of it as an Western name for a Japanese Zanbatō or a Chinese Zhanmadao.

Of course it doesn't help that longswords are a One-handed weapon in D&D, making the names of other swords become thrown out of balance. I would think the D&D longsword as an Arming Sword, the Greatsword as a Longsword(which is actually a two-handed weapon), and the "Fullblade" as Greatsword to stand in for the names of Zweihander and Claymore and place the Zhanmadao and Zanbatō in the same. Sadly switching the names around like that would confuse many other players and probably cause complaints.
It's from the Adventurer's Vault and they have an illustration for it too.

2-handed superior, +3 prof, 1d12 damage, high crit. The picture they have for it shows a sword bigger than the broadsword, lots of jagged and serrated edges.
It's from the Adventurer's Vault and they have an illustration for it too.

2-handed superior, +3 prof, 1d12 damage, high crit. The picture they have for it shows a sword bigger than the broadsword, lots of jagged and serrated edges.

Can anyone post that picture. If you just want to send it to me (jr@ncrcag.com).
IMAGE(http://images.wikia.com/finalfantasy/images/d/d2/2journal.jpg)
Wishlist: -Alternate ability bonuses for pre-PHB3 races -Lots more superior implements or an official customization rule -Monk multiclass feat that grants Unarmed Combatant
Angsty ex-SOLDIER delivery boy not included.
WOLead's got it right, but the Nodachi/Daikatana are all about the same thing and included in that category. I personally use it as a Katana, just maybe 2-3 inches longer and half-a-pound heavier is all.
Resident Logic Cannon
IMAGE(http://images.wikia.com/finalfantasy/images/d/d2/2journal.jpg)

That looks more like an Executioner's blade to me.
WOLead's got it right, but the Nodachi/Daikatana are all about the same thing and included in that category. I personally use it as a Katana, just maybe 2-3 inches longer and half-a-pound heavier is all.

What about this:

The picture they have for it shows a sword bigger than the broadsword, lots of jagged and serrated edges.

The reason it matters is someone is drawing my character, and I want it to match my character sheet. I sent them this image for a reference:

IMAGE(http://lib5.store.yahoo.co.jp/lib/kasimaw/zanbato-ss-001.jpg)

Should I tell the artist to add the jagged and serrated edges?
A Full Blade is just the DnD term for a Big Fragging Sword. You can have it look like an Ichigo-sized katana, or a 12-foot long zweihander, or whatever. All you have to know is that it is a sword that is so big people wonder "how the crap does he swing that thing?"
No, the entire AV book has weapons that are more barbaric-looking, so they ALL have jagged edges and the like for some reason. Notice that no Empire in History is famous for its jagged-edged blades.

Mostly, a fullblade (for DnD comparisons, at least) is about the length of a Bastard Sword, but also heavier (or at least more weighted) than a Greatsword. It mostly has to do with the momentum and force you can put behind the weapon (which is why axes in medieval times didn't have two heads to "deal more damage," they just had longer hafts (handles) so that you could put more force behind your swing).
Resident Logic Cannon
The 3E Arms and Equipment guide described them as being a full 18 inches longer than a Zweihänder (which already had a blade up to 5 feet long). On a side note, Zweihänders (I don't know German, so I just pluralized the American form) were likely just for show, too big to be wielded in actual combat.
The 3E Arms and Equipment guide described them as being a full 18 inches longer than a Zweihänder (which already had a blade up to 5 feet long). On a side note, Zweihänders (I don't know German, so I just pluralized the American form) were likely just for show, too big to be wielded in actual combat.

English is a Germanic language, so you DO just add an "s."

Zweihanders were a measure of prowess, and were only used for short time by the more barbaric Germanic ancestors, until the Romans came and crushed them underfoot.
Resident Logic Cannon
I was right, then. So how does Doppelgänger get pluralized? Also, the Romans won mainly because they had socks. It's a long story.
Also, the Romans won mainly because they had socks. It's a long story.

Of course, because everyone knows you can't have a Blanket party without socks of loose change, and what is morale without a Blanket party?
I was right, then. So how does Doppelgänger get pluralized? Also, the Romans won mainly because they had socks. It's a long story.

Of course, because everyone knows you can't have a Blanket party without socks of loose change, and what is morale without a Blanket party?

Huh, you mean it wasn't due to the Sock 'n Rock improvised weapon?
The historian in me weeps for this thread, but I seem to be drawing a lot of contempt lately waving my degrees and learnings around, so I'm just gonna shut up.:embarrass

SO anyway:
A Full Blade is just the DnD term for a Big Fragging Sword. You can have it look like an Ichigo-sized katana, or a 12-foot long zweihander, or whatever. All you have to know is that it is a sword that is so big people wonder "how the crap does he swing that thing?"

This seems to be the general design philosophy of 4e, and is thus probably the most accurate post in this thread. :P
The fact is pretty much every bit of equipment in 4e looks like whatever you want it to look like (this actually holds true for every edition, but 4e seems to convey this the best). Sure, most of it does have a real-world counterpart, but in many cases these real world counterparts serve as a frame of reference rather than a hard "all X look like this."

Personally, I've always imagined Fullblades looking like the Dragonslayer from Berserk, which if you haven't read you should do so RIGHT NOW.
This new forum is terrible. Try again Wizards.
On a side note, Zweihänders (I don't know German, so I just pluralized the American form) were likely just for show, too big to be wielded in actual combat.

The actual plural is just "Zweihänder", same as the singular.

Zweihanders were a measure of prowess, and were only used for short time by the more barbaric Germanic ancestors, until the Romans came and crushed them underfoot.

So what about the lansquenets? I think their pike-and-greatsword formations were about a thousand years after the Romans...

However, the D&D weapon seems to be more inspired by the above-mentioned not-even-Ex-SOLDIER.
The actual plural is just "Zweihänder", same as the singular.


So what about the lansquenets? I think their pike-and-greatsword formations were about a thousand years after the Romans...

However, the D&D weapon seems to be more inspired by the above-mentioned not-even-Ex-SOLDIER.

Wait...isn't it "die ZweihaenderN" for the plural? Hrrm...


Heh. Weren't the Lansquenets a crazy Merc Company who the French hired to beat the tar out of the English? My memory isn't all that great for History sometimes. :$


Eh. As someone else said, a Fullblade is whatever you want it to be, looks however you want it to look. Dealing massive damage and having high crit could probably just make it someone's version of the Uranium Katana.
Resident Logic Cannon
you are thinking of den die das die -n which is accusative case, if we are going with normal nomitive case the plural would be die zwiehaender (I apologize but my computer doesn't do umloats) and the s gets added anything in German that sounds foreign like die restorants, zwiehaender literally translated to two hand simply speaking it was used at a point in time just like almost all weapons of the sharp and pointy variety, it then gets replaced as soon as the people find a more efficient or fun way to kill their foes.
I would imagine that a fullblade refers to a sword where the width of the blade is the full width of your hand, pinky to thumb. It's got a single curved edge and is more of a chopping and hacking weapon. I tend to think of it looking like an extra long butterfly knife a little shorter than a two-handed sword but significantly thicker. I looked around for a good image, but unfortunately I can't find any real good ones. Sorry.

By the way, the one you see in Adventurer's Vault with all the jaggies is of tiefling make--which is why it looks so wicked nasty.
Now with 100% more Vorthos!
oh also berserk has some swords that would make a good example of this (I would consider zodd, and Guts's swords good examples, while in the manga the dragon slaying sword guts gets might be even bigger than a fullblade.)
Wait...isn't it "die ZweihaenderN" for the plural? Hrrm...

It isn't. Forming a plural version of a german word is not quite as straight-forward as with most english ones.

Heh. Weren't the Lansquenets a crazy Merc Company who the French hired to beat the tar out of the English? My memory isn't all that great for History sometimes. :$

Wiki is your friend.
It isn't. Forming a plural version of a german word is not quite as straight-forward as with most english ones.

No, I'm aware of that, it's just that "das Zweihaender" already has the umlaut, so I figure it's "die Zweihaendern" or "die Zweihaenderen."

Wiki is your friend.

Ah, of course. Oh, well. Close enough. :P
Resident Logic Cannon
The historian in me weeps for this thread, but I seem to be drawing a lot of contempt lately waving my degrees and learnings around, so I'm just gonna shut up.:embarrass .

The first step ,Grasshopper, is that you have identified the problem with your attitude. Grasshopper, now you must find a way to correct the snobby attitude and nocuous forum posts. I believe in you . You can do it!
the more barbaric Germanic ancestors, until the Romans came and crushed them underfoot.

"Quintili Vare, legiones redde!"
-- Augustus Caesar, according to Suetonius, used to bang his head against the walls yelling so (it means 'Quintilius Varus, give me back my legions!')

Crushed by the romans, eh? :D
I suppose it has been a few years since the last post but I wanted to add my three copper pieces.  

As some people have said, 4e is pushing to have generic weapons, armors, and items that allow for a player to "flesh out" their equipment to fit their own style, even with equipment they have claimed as loot (the evil bad guy knight's bastard sword in the cruciform style with lots of skulls and black metal...oh yeah the good guy samurai picked it up and it is now a katana with white metal and etchings of dragons...).  So, your fullblade (or greatsword or warhammer or flail) can look how you want.

However, I also like to pay attention to some shread of realism in terms of carrying items.  Technically a high-strength fighter can carry a lot of stuff without penalty.  Wearing a suit of armor, he can probably fit a suit of armor, a couple of big swords, a bow and a whole lot of arrows, a pile of daggers to make a thieves guild jealous, and rations to feed an army all under his "carrying capacity" given by his strength.  As long as he can tell me where all of this fits on his person and is willing to accept arbitrary penalties such as fitting into small spaces with his backpack on and potentially speed at which he can retrieve a single item, I am fine with carrying extra stuff.  The massive "buster"-style swords bug me though and I would consider those maybe a large fullblade or something larger.  The fighter would not be able to wield it much less carry it.  Most of the equipment depicted in the books is fine by me...maybe a little weird and impractical...and maybe just fashioned in the dwarf/elf/drow/tiefling/dragonborn/gnome/eldritchhorror style...

Anyway, my current thought on the fullblade is it being one of the larger swords of history such as the nodachi or the zweihander or the claymore.  It took a special warrior to properly use one of these big swords (hence the feat) and the size fits the stats to me.  If people like those swords being a greatsword, that is fine with me.  But then I would suggest that the fullblade is a slightly larger version.  While there was an "average" claymore, if you look hard enough you will find claymores that are longer...some up to a full six feet.  One character I play who wields a "fullblade" has a claymore somewhere between five-and-a-half and six feet long.  Of course, he is six-and-a-half feet tall himself.
I just think of the fullblade as a BFS.
But then again I'm an Exalted player at heart.
We once did some math on the appropriate weight of some of the swords described for player use there and found the heaviest to weigh around 300 kgs x)
4th ED is realistic in comparison.
I just got married, 16.7.2011, to a sexy librarian :D Suck it fate, there's no justice in the real world. There's no way I deserve this ;) -------------- The most interesting rules always kinda taste like lasagna
The fullblade of 4e is sadly a far cry from the mighty sword it was back in 3e, what with the die change of 2d8 to 1d10 just on the dmg spectrum.

Also a fullblade (also known as Orge Greatswords) were 6 1/2 to 7 inches long (that being just the blade! The handle added another two and a half inches)

Also, Zweihander blades were not the best in dirrect sword combat, their purpose was for cutting down pikeman.