Steady Sanguine Crossbowman

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I'd like some feedback on this character. I apologize if someone has already posted an identical one -- I couldn't find with my searching.

This is a character focused around:

1) Ranged, having a bit of melee backup, and some attacks that are not vs. AC. Quick draw allows him to shift to melee if it's for some reason essential.
2) Being invisible as often as possible, and therefor applying combat advantage to his ranged attacks and opening up the option of sneak attacking, as well as making it easier to stand in one place.
3) Making opponents bleed, and applying other status effects, particularly impairments on movement. He has a substantial amount of control for single targets/small groups.
5) Moving around a lot if he cannot become invisible, he's fighting tremorsense or otherwise immune creatures, or just due to terrain constraints.

Barring the ability to stand in one place and plink enemies while occasionally going invisible from his paragon power and gaining CA, his tactics in a more advanced or open-terrain fight will be to use his Impossible to Catch ability to obtain invisibility, move and stealth, and then use a second minor action to hide in plain sight. (move minor minor) If damage output is necessary the first round, he can spend an action point to obtain the move action for free (paragon power) and still make two attack actions, from two different squares. (minor, minor, attack, extra move, extra attack)

If any enemies seem able to see him, and others cannot, he will use his bow to immobilize, stun, slow or knock down these enemies.

His theoretical single-round maximum damage output expending an action point versus a single target is about 10d8+96 + 3d6. That means hitting 6 times +25 vs AC, though (Bleeding Wounds and Confounding Arrows). And, he's much more versatile than a single-target DPSer, regardless.

When he randomly becomes invisible due to killing or critting enemies, he will (if not already hiding in plain sight), move to concealment squares in preparation for stealthing at the end of his next turn.

While he's standing still -- which HIPS enables handily -- he can add +3 damage to all of his crossbow attacks for Steady Shooter for a good damage boost.

His mettle feat reduces the amount of damage he will take from area attacks in his general vicinity.

He's also a perception monkey and has a great score in Thievery and Stealth so he can fulfill the rogue role in the party. His athletics/acrobatics scores are to mitigate the possibility of being grabbed, and to enhance his mobility in terms of climbing/jumping/falling.

So, at level 20 with +4 Darkhide Armor, cloak +4, crossbow+4, short sword+4:

Race: Elf
HP: 125, AC: 36 (38 vs. OA), Fort: 28, Rfx: 32, Will: 29, Speed: 7.
Stats: Str - 11, Dex - 25, Con - 16, Int - 10, Wis - 18, Cha - 8
Basic Attack (Ranged - Crossbow, 20/35): +23/1d8+13
Class: Ranger (Archer), Paragon: Master Infiltrator

Skills: Nature (21), Stealth (24), Perception (21), Athletics (17), Thievery (22), Acrobatics (24)

Feats: Defensive Mobility (bonus), Lethal Hunter, Sneak of Shadows, Acolyte Power, Adept Power, Elven Precision, Quick Draw, Weapon Focus: Crossbow, Steady Shooter, Distant Shot, Armor Specialization: Hide, Mettle, Far Shot

Powers (* indicates can be used with a light blade as well as a crossbow)

At Will Powers: Twin Strike (1-2 Targets, +23 vs AC/1d8), Nimble Strike (Can Shift 1 Before or After, +23 vs AC/1d8+13)

Encounter Attack Powers:


Disruptive Strike - Immediate Interrupt, Trigger: Ally or Myself is Attacked, +23 vs AC. Hit: 1d8+13 Damage. The triggering attack suffers a -7 modifier.

* Distracting Wound - Ranged or Melee Attack +23 vs AC, Target: One creature against which I have CA. Hit: 2d8+13 Damage. Opponent grants CA to myself and allies until end of next turn.

Knockdown Shot - Ranged Attack +23 vs. Reflex. Hit: 2d8+13 Damage. Opponent knocked prone if medium or smaller.

Pinning Strike - Ranged Attack +23 vs AC, Target: 1 or 2 creatures. 2 Attacks: Hit: 1d8+13 Damage per. Target immobilized until start of my next turn.

Daily Attack Powers:

* Walking Wounded - Ranged or Melee Attack +23 vs Fort, Target: 1 Creature. Hit: 2d8+13 damage. Target is knocked prone. Until end of encounter, target falls prone if it moves more than half its movement in one action. Miss: Half Damage. Target is not knocked prone.

Confounding Arrows: Ranged Attack +23 vs AC. Target: 1-3 Creatures. Hit: 1d8+13 damage. If creature is hit by one shot: dazed. Two shots: Stunned. Three shots: Stunned and +2d8 damage. (Save Ends) for all. Miss: Target is dazed. (Save Ends)

Bleeding Wounds: Ranged Attack +23 vs AC. Target: 1-3 Creatures. Hit: 1d8+13 damage. If creature is hit by one shot: Ongoing 5. Two shots: Ongoing 10. Three Shots: Ongoing 15. (Save Ends) for all. Miss: Half damage, no ongoing.

* Painful Puncture: Ranged or Melee +23 vs AC. Target: 1 creature. Hit: 3d8+13 damage. Ongoing 10 Damage. (Save Ends) Miss: Half Damage, no Ongoing.

Utility Powers:

Yield Ground: Encounter. Immediate Reaction. Trigger: Take Damage. Effect: Shift up to Wisdom Modifier. Gain +2 power bonus to defenses until end of my next turn.

Weave Through the Fray: Encounter. Immediate Interrupt. Trigger: Enemy moves adjacent to me. Effect: Shift a number of squares equal to my wisdom modifier.

Open the Range: Daily. Immediate Interrupt. Trigger: Enemy moves adjacent to me. Effect: Shift 1 square, them move a number of squares equal to my wisdom modifier. Can't end move next to triggering enemy.

Impossible to Catch: Encounter. Minor Action. Become invisible until the start of my next turn.

Hide in Plain Sight: Encounter. Minor Action. Must already be hidden. Invisible until I leave my current square. No other action renders me visible.

Elven Precision: Encounter. Can reroll an attack with a +2 bonus.

Sneak Attack: Encounter. Once per encounter, deal +3d6 damage to an enemy against whom I have combat advantage.

Class / Paragon Powers:

Hunter's Quarry: Designate nearest enemy. Deal +2d8 damage to them once per round.

Prime Shot: +1 to hit if nearest of group to targetted enemy.

Master Infiltrator: When spend AP for attack action, gain move action also.

Skillful Infiltrator: +2 to athletics, acrobatics, stealth

Invisible Infiltrator: When drop an opponent to 0 or fewer, or critically hit an opponent, go invisible until end of my next turn

Progression

1 - A - Twin Strike
1 - A - Nimble Strike
1 - E - Fanged Strike
1 - D - Hunter's Bear Trap
1 - F - Lethal Hunter
2 - U - Yield Ground
2 - F - Sneak of Shadows
3 - E - Disruptive Strike
4 - F - Elven Precision
4 - S - Dex/Con
5 - D - Splintering Shot
6 - U - Weave Thru the Fray
6 - F - Improved Init
7 - E - Hawk's Talon
8 - F - Focus: Bow
8 - S - Dex/Con
9 - D - Spray of Arrows
10 - F - Adept Power - Walking Wounded replaces Splintering Shot
10 - U - Open the Range
10 - Retrain Improved Init to Quick Draw
11 - Paragon: Master Infiltrator
11 - Retrain Weapon Focus Bow to Weapon Focus Crossbow
11 - PE: Distracting Wound
11 - S - All
11 - F - Steady Shooter
11 - F - Distant Shot
12 - PU - Impossible to Catch
13 - E - Knockdown Strike replaces Fanged Strike
14 - F - Armor Spec: Hide
14 - S - Dex/Wis
15 - D - Confounding Arrows replaces Spray of Arrows
16 - F - Adept Power - Hide In Plain Sight replaces whatever lvl 16 utility
17 - E - Pinning Strike replaces Hawk's Talon
18 - S - Dex/Wis
19 - F - Mettle
19 - D - Bleeding Wounds replaces Hunter's Bear Trap
20 - PD - Painful Puncture
20 - F - Far Shot

Starting Stats: Str - 10, Dex - 20, Con - 13, Int - 10, Wis - 15, Cha - 8
I'm a fan of crossbow rangers, but why do you boost Cha at ever opportunity instead of Dex?
I've been fiddling with a Sniper myself, but built it differently: I was thinking along the lines of a Bugbear going Brutal Scoundrel as race and base class, multiclassing into Ranger to pick up Battle Archer. (Now that I see the Master Infiltrator's Invisible Infiltrator, I might rethink at least the Paragon portion of that build.)

The point is that as a Bugbear, I can use a Large Crossbow, doing 1d10 damage, plus I get a Strength bonus to my Sneak Attacks. And those are hilariously easy to get when you're Invisible, and go beyond the nearest enemy to include that caster in the back.

I'm unsure about the stat block though; I'll want high DEX for the attacks, a good bit of STR for the bonus damage, but Steady Shooter requires CON 15, so I'd need to start with 14 to qualify for the Feat by Paragon Tier. I was thinking 16 14 14 12 11 8, with 16 for DEX (+2 for 18) and one 14 for STR (+2 for STR).
I'm a fan of crossbow rangers, but why do you boost Cha at ever opportunity instead of Dex?

That would be because I posted it at 2am. Just a typo. It's fixed, now.

Anyone else have any comments?
I've been fiddling with a Sniper myself, but built it differently: I was thinking along the lines of a Bugbear going Brutal Scoundrel as race and base class, multiclassing into Ranger to pick up Battle Archer. (Now that I see the Master Infiltrator's Invisible Infiltrator, I might rethink at least the Paragon portion of that build.)

The point is that as a Bugbear, I can use a Large Crossbow, doing 1d10 damage, plus I get a Strength bonus to my Sneak Attacks. And those are hilariously easy to get when you're Invisible, and go beyond the nearest enemy to include that caster in the back.

I'm unsure about the stat block though; I'll want high DEX for the attacks, a good bit of STR for the bonus damage, but Steady Shooter requires CON 15, so I'd need to start with 14 to qualify for the Feat by Paragon Tier. I was thinking 16 14 14 12 11 8, with 16 for DEX (+2 for 18) and one 14 for STR (+2 for STR).

Yea, moving it out the other way (from Rogue to Ranger) allows you to stack some more attributes -- but also makes you a little more MAD susceptible than the reverse, where all you care about is dex and feat-qualifying scores in Con and Wis. Of course, rogues don't care at all about Wis. So a block score of:

Str 16 (5)
Dex 18 (9)
Con 14 (5)
Int 8 (0)
Wis 13 (3)
Cha 10 (0)

Would give you a stupid but otherwise pretty handy bugbear assault wagon. I'm not sure how to take best advantage of his power selection, but I do remember seeing a few brutal scoundrel abilities that I wished I could somehow include. Surprise knockdown would be nice, too.
I was puzzling over that for awhile. The stat block looks reasonable, and you'd still qualify for everything important.
I've been fiddling with a Sniper myself, but built it differently: I was thinking along the lines of a Bugbear going Brutal Scoundrel as race and base class, multiclassing into Ranger to pick up Battle Archer. (Now that I see the Master Infiltrator's Invisible Infiltrator, I might rethink at least the Paragon portion of that build.)

Technically you can't multiclass into Battle Archer because you don't have the Archer Fighting Style class feature. For whatever reason the Warrior of the Wild feat doesn't qualify you for Ranger paragon paths like Pact Initiative qualifies you for a Warlock path, so the only way to get it is to start out as a Ranger. Still it's not a big stretch for a DM to houserule it.
Overall, I like the build, but have a question. If this has been clarified in an errata or on DDI, please point me at that:

Why Twin Strike? Given the "load minor" on the crossbow, it seems to me that Nimble Strike and Careful Attack would be more fitting -Twin Strike wouldn't work with a crossbow.

I am aware of the note on PHB 217 about the reloading time being subsumed into the power, but this seems to be in reference to powers which hit multiple targets on a single attack (such as the rogue's blinding barrage), rather than powers which allow multiple attacks.

Is there any definite ruling on this?
-m4ki; one down, one to go

"Retro is not new. Retro-fit is not new." --Seeker95, on why I won't be playing DDN

|| DDN Metrics (0-10) | enthusiasm: 1 | confidence in design: -3 | desire to play: 0 | Sticking with 4e?: Yep. | Better Options: IKRPG Mk II ||
The Five Things D&D Next Absolutely Must Not Do:
1. Imbalanced gameplay. Any and all characters must be able to contribute equally both in combat and out of combat at all levels of play. If the Fighters are linear and the Wizards quadratic, I walk. 2. Hardcore simulationist approach. D&D is a game about heroic fantasy. I'm weak and useless enough in real life; I play RPGs for a change of pace. If the only reason a rule exists is because "that's how it's supposed to be", I walk. I don't want a game that "simulates" real life, I want a game that simulates heroic fantasy. 3. Worshipping at false idols (AKA Sacred Cows). If the only reason a rule exists is "it's always been that way", I walk. Now to be clear, I have no problem with some things not changing; my issue is with retaining bad idea simply for the sake of nostalgia. 4. DM vs. players. If the game encourages "gotcha!" moments or treats the DM and players as enemies, adversaries, or problems to be overcome, I walk. 5. Rules for the sake of rules. The only thing I want rules for is the things I can't do sitting around a table with my friends. If the rules try to step on my ability to roleplay the character I want to roleplay, I walk. Furthermore, the rules serve to facilitate gameplay, not to simulate the world. NOTE: Items in red have been violated.
Chris Perkins' DM Survival Tips:
1. When in doubt, wing it. 2. Keep the story moving. Go with the flow. 3. Sometimes things make the best characters. 4. Always give players lots of things to do. 5. Wherever possible, say ‘yes.’ 6. Cheating is largely unnecessary. 7. Don't be afraid to give the characters a fun new toy. 8. Don't get in the way of a good players exchange. 9. Avoid talking too much. 10. Save some details for later. 11. Be transparent. 12. Don't show all your cards. Words to live by.
Quotes From People Smarter Than Me:
"Essentials zigged, when I wanted to continue zagging..." -Foxface on Essentials "Servicing a diverse fan base with an RPG ruleset - far from being the mandate for 'open design space' and a cavalier attitude towards balance - requires creating a system that /works/, with minimal fuss, for a wide variety of play styles, not just from one group to the next, but at the same table." -Tony_Vargas on design "Mearls' and Cook's stated intent to produce an edition that fans of all previous editions (and Pathfinder) will like more than their current favourite edition is laudable. But it is also, IMO, completely unrealistic. It's like people who pray for world peace: I might share their overall aims, but I'm not going to hold my breath waiting for them to succeed. When they talk in vague terms about what they'd like to do in this new edition, I mostly find myself thinking 'hey, that sounds cool, assuming they can pull it off', but almost every time they've said something specific about actual mechanics, I've found myself wincing and shaking my head in disbelief and/or disgust, either straight away or after thinking about the obvious implications for half a minute." -Duskweaver on D&D Next
Overall, I like the build, but have a question. If this has been clarified in an errata or on DDI, please point me at that:

Why Twin Strike? Given the "load minor" on the crossbow, it seems to me that Nimble Strike and Careful Attack would be more fitting -Twin Strike wouldn't work with a crossbow.

I am aware of the note on PHB 217 about the reloading time being subsumed into the power, but this seems to be in reference to powers which hit multiple targets on a single attack (such as the rogue's blinding barrage), rather than powers which allow multiple attacks.

Is there any definite ruling on this?

He has quick draw, so he doesn't have to worry about consuming an action for the reload.

As to the wording on page 217, I agree that it's vague. With Quick Draw taking care of crossbows and slings, bows being load free, and magical daggers never having to be "drawn", though, it seems like after level 2 or so you never really have to worry about loading your ranged weapon.

Makes you wonder why they bothered with a ruleset for it, at all.
He has quick draw, so he doesn't have to worry about consuming an action for the reload.

Er... no? Quick draw allows you to draw a weapon or other small item (implicitly an implement) as part of the same action used to attack with it. It does nothing for the reload time of a crossbow by any interpretation and has not, to my knowledge, been changed in the errata.
-m4ki; one down, one to go

"Retro is not new. Retro-fit is not new." --Seeker95, on why I won't be playing DDN

|| DDN Metrics (0-10) | enthusiasm: 1 | confidence in design: -3 | desire to play: 0 | Sticking with 4e?: Yep. | Better Options: IKRPG Mk II ||
The Five Things D&D Next Absolutely Must Not Do:
1. Imbalanced gameplay. Any and all characters must be able to contribute equally both in combat and out of combat at all levels of play. If the Fighters are linear and the Wizards quadratic, I walk. 2. Hardcore simulationist approach. D&D is a game about heroic fantasy. I'm weak and useless enough in real life; I play RPGs for a change of pace. If the only reason a rule exists is because "that's how it's supposed to be", I walk. I don't want a game that "simulates" real life, I want a game that simulates heroic fantasy. 3. Worshipping at false idols (AKA Sacred Cows). If the only reason a rule exists is "it's always been that way", I walk. Now to be clear, I have no problem with some things not changing; my issue is with retaining bad idea simply for the sake of nostalgia. 4. DM vs. players. If the game encourages "gotcha!" moments or treats the DM and players as enemies, adversaries, or problems to be overcome, I walk. 5. Rules for the sake of rules. The only thing I want rules for is the things I can't do sitting around a table with my friends. If the rules try to step on my ability to roleplay the character I want to roleplay, I walk. Furthermore, the rules serve to facilitate gameplay, not to simulate the world. NOTE: Items in red have been violated.
Chris Perkins' DM Survival Tips:
1. When in doubt, wing it. 2. Keep the story moving. Go with the flow. 3. Sometimes things make the best characters. 4. Always give players lots of things to do. 5. Wherever possible, say ‘yes.’ 6. Cheating is largely unnecessary. 7. Don't be afraid to give the characters a fun new toy. 8. Don't get in the way of a good players exchange. 9. Avoid talking too much. 10. Save some details for later. 11. Be transparent. 12. Don't show all your cards. Words to live by.
Quotes From People Smarter Than Me:
"Essentials zigged, when I wanted to continue zagging..." -Foxface on Essentials "Servicing a diverse fan base with an RPG ruleset - far from being the mandate for 'open design space' and a cavalier attitude towards balance - requires creating a system that /works/, with minimal fuss, for a wide variety of play styles, not just from one group to the next, but at the same table." -Tony_Vargas on design "Mearls' and Cook's stated intent to produce an edition that fans of all previous editions (and Pathfinder) will like more than their current favourite edition is laudable. But it is also, IMO, completely unrealistic. It's like people who pray for world peace: I might share their overall aims, but I'm not going to hold my breath waiting for them to succeed. When they talk in vague terms about what they'd like to do in this new edition, I mostly find myself thinking 'hey, that sounds cool, assuming they can pull it off', but almost every time they've said something specific about actual mechanics, I've found myself wincing and shaking my head in disbelief and/or disgust, either straight away or after thinking about the obvious implications for half a minute." -Duskweaver on D&D Next
One thing of note that I saw while building a crossbow ranger in my head (a theoretical, mental build) is that, under the Load description, it says the following:

"If a power allows you to hit multiple targets, the additional load time is accounted for in the power."

While it doesn't actually say that it includes the reload for making multiple attacks against the same target, I would think that its more of an oversight than an actual intentional limitation. I mean, it would make sense that if you could target one creature, shoot him, then reload, take aim, and fire at another creature all in a standard action, it should be easy to say you can take aim, fire, reload, fire, all in one standard action as well, right?

Maybe that's not how it is Rules as Written, but it seems that way with rules as intended, IMO.
The problem, Shedeo, is that the rule is so vaguely worded that it can be read to imply nearly anything.

Don't get me wrong, I want to agree with you, because it allows this very cool build to work. But I want to know if there's an official ruling somewhere that I missed, so that I can at least tell a player who comes across this issue that my answer is a houserule.
-m4ki; one down, one to go

"Retro is not new. Retro-fit is not new." --Seeker95, on why I won't be playing DDN

|| DDN Metrics (0-10) | enthusiasm: 1 | confidence in design: -3 | desire to play: 0 | Sticking with 4e?: Yep. | Better Options: IKRPG Mk II ||
The Five Things D&D Next Absolutely Must Not Do:
1. Imbalanced gameplay. Any and all characters must be able to contribute equally both in combat and out of combat at all levels of play. If the Fighters are linear and the Wizards quadratic, I walk. 2. Hardcore simulationist approach. D&D is a game about heroic fantasy. I'm weak and useless enough in real life; I play RPGs for a change of pace. If the only reason a rule exists is because "that's how it's supposed to be", I walk. I don't want a game that "simulates" real life, I want a game that simulates heroic fantasy. 3. Worshipping at false idols (AKA Sacred Cows). If the only reason a rule exists is "it's always been that way", I walk. Now to be clear, I have no problem with some things not changing; my issue is with retaining bad idea simply for the sake of nostalgia. 4. DM vs. players. If the game encourages "gotcha!" moments or treats the DM and players as enemies, adversaries, or problems to be overcome, I walk. 5. Rules for the sake of rules. The only thing I want rules for is the things I can't do sitting around a table with my friends. If the rules try to step on my ability to roleplay the character I want to roleplay, I walk. Furthermore, the rules serve to facilitate gameplay, not to simulate the world. NOTE: Items in red have been violated.
Chris Perkins' DM Survival Tips:
1. When in doubt, wing it. 2. Keep the story moving. Go with the flow. 3. Sometimes things make the best characters. 4. Always give players lots of things to do. 5. Wherever possible, say ‘yes.’ 6. Cheating is largely unnecessary. 7. Don't be afraid to give the characters a fun new toy. 8. Don't get in the way of a good players exchange. 9. Avoid talking too much. 10. Save some details for later. 11. Be transparent. 12. Don't show all your cards. Words to live by.
Quotes From People Smarter Than Me:
"Essentials zigged, when I wanted to continue zagging..." -Foxface on Essentials "Servicing a diverse fan base with an RPG ruleset - far from being the mandate for 'open design space' and a cavalier attitude towards balance - requires creating a system that /works/, with minimal fuss, for a wide variety of play styles, not just from one group to the next, but at the same table." -Tony_Vargas on design "Mearls' and Cook's stated intent to produce an edition that fans of all previous editions (and Pathfinder) will like more than their current favourite edition is laudable. But it is also, IMO, completely unrealistic. It's like people who pray for world peace: I might share their overall aims, but I'm not going to hold my breath waiting for them to succeed. When they talk in vague terms about what they'd like to do in this new edition, I mostly find myself thinking 'hey, that sounds cool, assuming they can pull it off', but almost every time they've said something specific about actual mechanics, I've found myself wincing and shaking my head in disbelief and/or disgust, either straight away or after thinking about the obvious implications for half a minute." -Duskweaver on D&D Next
Er... no? Quick draw allows you to draw a weapon or other small item (implicitly an implement) as part of the same action used to attack with it. It does nothing for the reload time of a crossbow by any interpretation and has not, to my knowledge, been changed in the errata.

I have no idea how I misread that. Ah well.

I'll keep quickdraw in the build to allow him to shift to melee if necessary.

The crossbow is “load
minor,” which means it requires a minor action to load
a bolt into the weapon. If a power allows you to hit
multiple targets, the additional load time is accounted
for in the power.

I honestly don't see how you can't read that as not meaning that load time becomes irrelevant with any ability that allows you to hit multiple targets (which is equivalent to every ability that allows you to hit multiple times), though, so I'll stand by this build working fine with a crossbow.

As I read it, this would mean that using any power with a crossbow requires a minor (to load it), then a standard (to shoot it as many times as the ability allows). It will never require multiple minor. This makes the move action granted by the AP usage more valuable for this build, since that move action can be used as a minor to reload the crossbow in between attacks.

However, any round in which you still had a move action remaining (that will be often on this build), you can use that move action for a minor to reload, so that next round you start with a loaded crossbow (leaving you minor/move/standard on that round)

Kind of a mess.
No, I see what he's saying.

The rule states that, should an ability allow you to attack multiple targets, the additional reload time is taken into account in the power. However, as-written, it is not taken into consideration when using a power that lets you make multiple attacks against the same target.

Essentially, how its written, the Rogue can use his Blinding Barrage power against 9 enemies with a crossbow and have no issues. However, the Ranger cannot use the same crossbow to shoot two bolts at one target using Twin Strike.

Believe me. I want the rules to work the way that I interpreted them, but M4kitsu is right. Now, I don't think that my interpretation is too far from believable. Makes crossbow rangers actually worth something, that's for sure. However, as I said before, as the rules are written, it doesn't work.
No, I see what he's saying.

The rule states that, should an ability allow you to attack multiple targets, the additional reload time is taken into account in the power. However, as-written, it is not taken into consideration when using a power that lets you make multiple attacks against the same target.

Essentially, how its written, the Rogue can use his Blinding Barrage power against 9 enemies with a crossbow and have no issues. However, the Ranger cannot use the same crossbow to shot two bolts at one target using Twin Strike.

Believe me. I want the rules to work the way that I interpreted them, but M4kitsu is right. Now, I don't think that my interpretation is too far from believable. Makes crossbow rangers actually worth something, that's for sure. However, as I said before, as the rules are written, it doesn't work.

If we're going to get that deep into the details,

"Anytime a power allows you"

Is very different from

"Anytime you use a power to"

Virtually every power that allows you to use multiple attacks from ranged, can in actuality be used against the same target multiple times. So, I think that both by a RAI read and a very strict RAW read, this is covered.
Do forgive, this was actually a clerical error on my part.

My memory failed me, and for some reason I believed that Twin Strike could only be used against one single creature (because for some reason I remembering "houseruling" it to be able to attack one or two creatures.)

So that's my bad, sorry for the distress. :embarrass

The crossbow works fine with Twin Strike, as originally thought.
Good, good. Then I'll still include it in my Handbook.
Gotta make room for the Superior Crossbow now
Definitely!

The superior xbow gives you the same 1d10 damage and range, but keep the rogue-sneak attack capability and +3 proficiency.
You also get the steady shot goodness.

Also, you WANT the swiftness property for your new xbow. It removes the minor load action, and has an encounter power to make a basic ranged shot for free!
This is a lot better than the frost-bow, which was probably the best choice prior.
My Sorc Guide Link: http://community.wizards.com/go/thread/view/75882/19649162/Joes_Sorcerer_Guide_AP_update_51509 My Genesi Wizard Blaster Link: http://community.wizards.com/go/thread/view/75882/25082729/Miniguide_to_Genesi_LightningThunder_Blaster_Wizard_%2806-2010%29
i believe, away from books, that the PHB2 has a heroic feat that allows loads as a free. Making it so that you don't have to have that specific weapon property.
i believe, away from books, that the PHB2 has a heroic feat that allows loads as a free. Making it so that you don't have to have that specific weapon property.



It's called "Speed Loader."  It works for any crossbow with the load minor property.
 
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