The Astral Demigod: How to kill Orcus with one basic melee attack

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Inspired by the Divine Recovery + Elven Accuracy = Infinite Rerolls thread, I originally posted the build there; however, I would like to create a new thread for discussion specifically about this build instead of the mechanics of Divine Miracle and Elven Accuracy.

The Astral Demigod
How to kill Orcus with one basic melee attack

IMAGE(http://img529.imageshack.us/img529/3914/celestialhflipvu4.jpg)



Level 30 Elf Paladin / Astral Weapon / Demigod
Tools:
Elven Accuracy
Pray for More
Divine Miracle
Vorpal Weapon
[!] Given this build, there are no additional feats, optional class powers, or ability scores that are required to accomplish the trick.

How it works:
Setup: Before attacking you must expend every encounter power you have except Elven Accuracy.
Execution:
Step (1) Approach your enemy.
Step (2) Perform a basic melee attack.
∟(2a) Regardless of the roll (even a natural 20), use Elven Accuracy to reroll.
Step (3) Reroll your attack. After rerolling, Elven Accuracy has been expended and you can use Divine Miracle.
∟(3a) If you roll a natural 20, you hit. Use Divine Miracle to recover Pray for More.
∟(3b) If you do not roll a natural 20, you might not hit. Use Divine Miracle to recover Elven Accuracy . Repeat Step (3).
Step (4) Roll for damage.
∟(4a) If you roll max damage, roll an additional die as provided by Vorpal Weapon. Repeat Step (4).
∟(4b) If you do not roll max damage, use Pray for More to reroll your damage. Upon expending Pray for More, use Divine Miracle to recover it. Repeat Step (4).
Step (5) Repeat Step (4) until your damage is greater than your target's hit points and other miscellaneous modifiers such as temporary hit points or resistances.
Step (6) To end the cycle after completing Step (5), Use Divine Miracle to recover Elven Accuracy instead of Pray for More. Thus, you will be able to repeat this trick upon your next attack.


Conclusion:
This build is capable of instantly killing anything with a basic melee attack at-will. Furthermore, the trick can be accomplished with any At-Will or Daily power also. However, It can not be used with an Encounter power! Astral Whirlwind would be great if you ever ran into a pack of Elder Red Dragons. You could even perform this trick multiple times in a single turn from things such as Opportunity Attacks or other bonus attacks.

Furthermore, the build is completely independent of feats, other powers, and ability scores. In terms of optimizing any of those, I would suggest optimizing your survivability as you no longer need to worry about your offensive capabilities.

Also, the base class of Paladin is not required. Only Astral Weapon and Demigod are required. Therefore, in the pursuit of defeating Orcus with each class, Level 30 Elf x / Astral Weapon / Demigod with Soldier of the Faith can serve as a template for any class.

Enjoy.
This is a hilarious and awesome combination to find. I definitely applaud the work and research it took to come across this gem of a combo. It certainly belongs in the realm of Theoretical Optimization, though.

One rules quandary. Would Pray for More require you to reroll ALL the dice involved in the attack, even the ones that have come up as maximum damage previously, or does the wording on Vorpal somehow make the additional damage dice separate from the initial roll?

I can see it leaning towards the latter, with the wording on Vorpal coming off as a variation on High Critical or the like. Unfortunately, I see almost every DM in the world letting you reroll High Critical + Base damage with Pray for More as one encounter power. The latter means you only have theoretically infinite damage, but really your damage is equal to how many times you're willing to roll the dice before people get angry at you.
Setup: Before attacking you must expend every encounter power you have except Elven Accuracy. (Use them on the nearest rabbit each morning.)

I'm compelled to point out you can't expend Encounter powers until you are actually in an encounter.

Cheers, -- N
Well, this is certainly impressive! I think it works, with the proviso as pointed out that you actually have to be willing to roll hundreds and thousands of dice for damage.

On the other hand, if you have a GM who understands mathematical proofs, you can simply demonstrate that you can achieve infinite damage to them in every encounter, providing you can act once.

They should accept that, put their GM screen away, declare you the winner of D&D, and cry themselves to sleep at night.

I'm imagining we might see an "update" on Divine Miracle at some point, though (although we haven't yet seen corrections for Blade Cascade or Seal of Binding - one assumes they're working on it...)

EDIT: Nifft, I really don't think that's a valid criticism - first of all, one can "create" an encounter at any point by determinedly declaring to a rabbit "thee, I will slay!" and then launching at it; secondly, it was very much my impression that encounter powers could be used at any point. I don't think there's a rule contrary to that is there? And if there is, does it not fly in the face of common sense?
I may have missed something here.

I can see how Pray For More allows you to re-roll your damage roll, but nothing that shows it allowing you to add any damage or make a second attack. So how does this do infinite damage?

EDIT: Nevermind, I see it now. Sigh. One more item for the errata pile.
Race for the Iron Throne - political and historical analysis of A Song of Ice and Fire.
I'm compelled to point out you can't expend Encounter powers until you are actually in an encounter.

You're joking right?
I may have missed something here.

I can see how Pray For More allows you to re-roll your damage roll, but nothing that shows it allowing you to add any damage or make a second attack. So how does this do infinite damage?

Vorpal Weapon.
This would run afoul of the rule about requiring actual meaningful threats to use your powers.

According to RAW, you can't attack a bunny to allow you to Cleave into Orcus, and so you cannot attack a bunny just to dump your encounter powers. You would have to use them in the actual encounter.
You're joking right?

Nope, just temporarily insane.

Carry on.

Cheers, -- N
This would run afoul of the rule about requiring actual meaningful threats to use your powers.

According to RAW, you can't attack a bunny to allow you to Cleave into Orcus, and so you cannot attack a bunny just to dump your encounter powers. You would have to use them in the actual encounter.

He has to use them in an actual encounter.

He just has to refrain from taking a Short Rest before visiting Orcus.

Cheers, -- N
This would run afoul of the rule about requiring actual meaningful threats to use your powers.

According to RAW, you can't attack a bunny to allow you to Cleave into Orcus, and so you cannot attack a bunny just to dump your encounter powers. You would have to use them in the actual encounter.

Well I am actually glad to see that the fault everyone is choosing to point out is the slaughtering of rabbits. I am glad, because this is the least important part of the build. Just go through some encounters before you can use this then. The trick will still work whether you can kill bunnies or not.
This would run afoul of the rule about requiring actual meaningful threats to use your powers.

According to RAW, you can't attack a bunny to allow you to Cleave into Orcus, and so you cannot attack a bunny just to dump your encounter powers. You would have to use them in the actual encounter.

He's right. Powers only work against a "meaningful threat."
I for one don't think someone actually bothering to do this needs to roll infinitely many dice to achieve infinite damage - as the in-game time is basically instantaneous, and the out-of-game mechanics are easily demonstrated, any reasonable DM will just say "Great, you win. You just completed your epic destiny and ascended to godhood as the god of arbitrary damage. Now, lets discuss houserules for the next game..."

(disturbingly enough, this reminds me of some old Type 1 magic combos back when i played MtG).
Hmm, well, how about Pray for More's statement that you must use "the second roll"? Would that, in everyone's opinion, prevent further re-rolls after the second from mattering?
I for one don't think someone actually bothering to do this needs to roll infinitely many dice to achieve infinite damage - as the in-game time is basically instantaneous, and the out-of-game mechanics are easily demonstrated, any reasonable DM will just say "Great, you win. You just completed your epic destiny and ascended to godhood as the god of arbitrary damage. Now, lets discuss houserules for the next game..."

I hate to disagree, but I really think any reasonable DM would say "Alright, go ahead and roll away." I believe that forcing a player to actually make all the rolls and suffer the wrath of his fellow gamers would be enough punishment for trying to use this trick. So as mentioned before, that is why this build is on the Optimization Boards and not the gametable.
Hmm, well, how about Pray for More's statement that you must use "the second roll"? Would that, in everyone's opinion, prevent further re-rolls after the second from mattering?

No. The "second roll" becomes the damage roll which the next instance targets. Ie, Pray for More targets a damage roll, and the new damage roll with Pray for More is always the second roll with respect to the targetted roll.

I hate to disagree, but I really think any reasonable DM would say "Alright, go ahead and roll away." I believe that forcing a player to actually make all the rolls and suffer the wrath of his fellow gamers would be enough punishment for trying to use this trick. So as mentioned before, that is why this build is on the Optimization Boards and not the gametable.

I would certainly allow the proof. I mean, its going to end up basically being a once-off effect that will end (at least for that character) a career with a completed epic destiny, because its suitably awesome. At which point, who really cares?

Edit: Bonus problem - demonstrate which weapon damage code approaches arbitrarium with a vorpal weapon and re-rolls the fastest. I think its probably 2d4 because 1/4 compared to 1/6 odds of a re-roll seems to be a much bigger effect than 2 extra damage per die when you do hit maximum, but I could be wrong.

(Basically, we're looking at how fast E[max damage rolled | k re-rolls] grows)
Hmm, well, how about Pray for More's statement that you must use "the second roll"? Would that, in everyone's opinion, prevent further re-rolls after the second from mattering?

Simple nesting as I see it allows this idea to work: coming from a programming background here it would look like this as a recursive function:

int DivineMiraclePrayForMore ( int DamageDie )<br /> {<br /> int Damage = rand(DamageDie);<br /> if (Damage != DamageDie)<br /> Damage = Divine MiraclePrayForMore ( DamageDie );<br /> return Damage ;<br /> }

Thus each iteration only 'sees' 2 rolls anyway.
At least, that's how I understand it, as displayed in very simplistic code form. Technically speaking, the order of things (as layed out in the OP) makes this code more like pseudocode than anything else. But that's besides the point.
How it works:
Setup: Before attacking you must expend every encounter power you have except Elven Accuracy.
Execution:
Step (1) Approach your enemy.
Step (2) Perform a basic melee attack.
∟(2a) Regardless of the roll (even a natural 20), use Elven Accuracy to reroll.
Step (3) Reroll your attack. After rerolling, Elven Accuracy has been expended and you can use Divine Miracle.
∟(3a) If you roll a natural 20, you hit. Use Divine Miracle to recover Pray for More.
∟(3b) If you do not roll a natural 20, you might not hit. Use Divine Miracle to recover Elven Accuracy . Repeat Step (3).
Step (4) Roll for damage.
∟(4a) If you roll max damage, roll an additional die as provided by Vorpal Weapon. Repeat Step (4).
∟(4b) If you do not roll max damage, use Pray for More to reroll your damage. Upon expending Pray for More, use Divine Miracle to recover it. Repeat Step (4).
Step (5) Repeat Step (4) until your damage is greater than your target's hit points and other miscellaneous modifiers such as temporary hit points or resistances.
Step (6) To end the cycle after completing Step (5), Use Divine Miracle to recover Elven Accuracy instead of Pray for More. Thus, you will be able to repeat this trick upon your next attack

Yes, I think this has been discussed a lot since 4E leaked. And the problems that were pointed out then were:

  • Can Divine Miracle recover Elven Accuracy? You know, the whole encounter/encounter-attack ambiguity.

  • When does Divine Miracle trigger? When you activate the power, or when the power takes effect? As in, does step 3b come before Elven Accuracy resolves and you are forced to use the second reroll?


Unless there is already a CustServ ruling on both points, this still relies on a particular interpretation of Divine Miracle.

By the way, the "second reroll" thing has already been clarified IIRC.
He's right. Powers only work against a "meaningful threat."

Could someone explain how "Im-the-biggest-and-baddest-and-most-dangerous-guy-in-the-whole-of-4E" orcus doesnt present a "Meaningful threat"?
I would consider the encounter has begun as soon as the player is aware of the presence of said uber-demon.
Yes, I think this has been discussed a lot since 4E leaked. And the problems that were pointed out then were:

  • Can Divine Miracle recover Elven Accuracy? You know, the whole encounter/encounter-attack ambiguity.

  • When does Divine Miracle trigger? When you activate the power, or when the power takes effect? As in, does step 3b come before Elven Accuracy resolves and you are forced to use the second reroll?


Unless there is already a CustServ ruling on both points, this still relies on a particular interpretation of Divine Miracle.

By the way, the "second reroll" thing has already been clarified IIRC.

Divine Miracle recovers an encounter power. Elven Accuracy is an encounter power. I don't see where there is abiguity of whether it is an attack or where it is relevant.

A power is expended when it has been used completely. Divine Miracle triggers when you have expended your last remaining encounter power. I once again don't see why this is an issue.
Could someone explain how "Im-the-biggest-and-baddest-and-most-dangerous-guy-in-the-whole-of-4E" orcus doesnt present a "Meaningful threat"?
I would consider the encounter has begun as soon as the player is aware of the presence of said uber-demon.

Indeed Orcus would be a meaningful threat, but that comment was concerning a cute, fuzzy, little bunny.
On the other hand, if you have a GM who understands mathematical proofs, you can simply demonstrate that you can achieve infinite damage to them in every encounter, providing you can act once.

They should accept that, put their GM screen away, declare you the winner of D&D, and cry themselves to sleep at night.

Actually, a GM that understands mathematical proofs knows it would take infinite time to roll infinite dice. They would demand the player go home and start on that right away, and not come back until they had succeeded.

Problem solved. :D
Tnyway, this is a good find, even better that it comes from a single basic attack. Even more elegant than Blade Cascade IMO. I imagine that WotC will errata (and any sane DM will houserule) that Divine Miracle gives you an encounter power back at the end of your turn, or something like that to kill all these wonderful infinite loops.
Divine Miracle recovers an encounter power. Elven Accuracy is an encounter power. I don't see where there is abiguity of whether it is an attack or where it is relevant.

Encounter attack powers are usually called encounter powers. Call this laziness on the part of the writers.

A power is expended when it has been used completely. Divine Miracle triggers when you have expended your last remaining encounter power. I once again don't see why this is an issue.

Because as part of Elven Accuracy, you are forced to choose the second roll. Therefore, after it resolves, you have already determined if you hit or not, if we go by the interpretation you have written (the one that rules out this build).
The other possible interpretation, which makes this work, is that you get back your power the moment you trigger it. This allows you to nest an Elven Accuracy inside another as many times as you want, the same way you would usually reroll a reroll.
Arismir, props! This is an elegant presentation; perfect artwork!
The bunny-slayer isn't bad either.
Just curious, how would it work with Elven Precision? Because if the +2 is somehow cumulative, any Elven Demigod could use a similar trick and instead auto-hit on every daily or at-will attack power, which would definitely be a bit nifty.
Actually, a GM that understands mathematical proofs knows it would take infinite time to roll infinite dice. They would demand the player go home and start on that right away, and not come back until they had succeeded.

Problem solved. :D

Well, it might not take an infinite amount of time to roll infinite dice; you might assume that rolling one dice takes no time at all (theoretically). In any case, the easier solution is to realise that the trick doesn't rely on producing *infinite* damage per se; but rather, any arbitrarily large amount. That would not take forever.

Probably only four or five decades.
Just curious, how would it work with Elven Precision? Because if the +2 is somehow cumulative, any Elven Demigod could use a similar trick and instead auto-hit on every daily or at-will attack power, which would definitely be a bit nifty.

Well of course this build could be simplified to work with just your hits. The real beauty is that you can make that hit force an instant kill though.
I can see another how it won't work.

Page 267 under Free Actions:

"The DM can limit the number of free actions..."

RAW allows DM's to limit free actions, so the DM is allowed to cut you off at any point he wants to.
I can see another how it won't work.

Page 267 under Free Actions:

"The DM can limit the number of free actions..."

RAW allows DM's to limit free actions, so the DM is allowed to cut you off at any point he wants to.

DM could do that anyways due to Rule 0. The idea behind all these rerolls and free actions, none of them take any time in-game, because you aren't making additional attacks, you're just forcing a luckier roll (in a sense). Therefore, there is no reason why the DM would limit them in terms of in-game time constraint in a round.
I appreciate the elegance of this build: for me what makes it elegant is that it is using the RAI as well as the RAW. Obviously, the designers didn't foresee or intend this combination and its heinous results, but each of the individual powers being used appears to be being used exactly as intended (from the text we have to interpret from).

Any arbitrarily large amount of damage from a basic melee attack... by the RAW and the RAI... mucho grande kudos.
DM could do that anyways due to DM fiat.

Which most optimizers, though not necessarily the Original Poster, would argue is a house rule and doesn't/shouldn't affect the viability of their build. The fact that this is in the rules bypasses that.

The idea behind all these rerolls and free actions, none of them take any time in-game, because you aren't making additional attacks, you're just forcing a luckier roll (in a sense). Therefore, there is no reason why the DM would limit them in terms of time constraint in a round.

Actually, they are taking time. Elven Accuracy is invoked by taking the barest of an instant to focus. Pray for More comes from praying. These don't take much time, which is why they are free actions, but they require some form of action on the part of the character to use.

The Demigod power doesn't reverse time so that the use of the power never happens, it recharges your mind and abilities to allow you to use it.

Every time you use a free action to use Elven Accuracy, that instant stretches a little bit longer. Every time you Pray for More, the pray gets long and more complex.

If you re-write the way the Demigod's power works so that it reverses the results and lets you try again, then there is no reason for the DM to limit free actions for anything other than meta-game reasons. But since the Demigod actual just gains the ability to use the ability again, it means they are repeating the actions required to use the powers in the first place, and that gives the DM in game reason to say they've used up their free actions.
I find it odd that the designers didn't prohibit rerolling a reroll. Almost every dice game I can think of prohibits rerolls so I doubt it didn't occur to them as professional game designers.
Actually, they are taking time. Elven Accuracy is invoked by taking the barest of an instant to focus. Pray for More comes from praying. These don't take much time, which is why they are free actions, but they require some form of action on the part of the character to use.

I would say you're incorporating a little fluff into the restrictions of the build. Yes, the DM can limit it, and once again, the DM can do that anyways even without a house rule. The CO boards have always assumed a very Laissez-faire DM, and once again that is why the build is on the CO message boards and not the gametable.
I find it odd that the designers didn't prohibit rerolling a reroll. Almost every dice game I can think of prohibits rerolls so I doubt it didn't occur to them as professional game designers.

The fact is, having Elven Accuracy avaiable to reroll itself is still RAI until we get clarification on how Divine Miracle works. And if you ask CustServ about this you will probably get something like:
Thanks for the great feedback! We’ve passed this along to the good folks that make the games and hopefully we’ll see some errata covering this situation soon. Until then, it is up to your Dungeon Master to determine how he/she wants to handle this particular situation in their campaign.

Which has already happened with Time Stop.
Well I am actually glad to see that the fault everyone is choosing to point out is the slaughtering of rabbits. I am glad, because this is the least important part of the build. Just go through some encounters before you can use this then. The trick will still work whether you can kill bunnies or not.

Nah, it's just that people who read "the second roll" as "the roll between the first roll and the third roll" are probably tired of pointing this fact out.

Cheers, -- N
Actually, they are taking time. Elven Accuracy is invoked by taking the barest of an instant to focus. Pray for More comes from praying. These don't take much time, which is why they are free actions, but they require some form of action on the part of the character to use.

This is one way to view the powers - but even with this view, both actions occur while the attack takes place (the elf focuses on his attack and prays that it will slay his enemy) and invoke the "luck" to allow it to take place.

In game, in fluff, the character doesn't see the results and then amend them - he simply focuses and the effect appears.

The Demigod power doesn't reverse time so that the use of the power never happens, it recharges your mind and abilities to allow you to use it.

But if the power is one used simultaneously with the attack, then time does not need to be reversed to allow it to be used.

Every time you use a free action to use Elven Accuracy, that instant stretches a little bit longer. Every time you Pray for More, the pray gets long and more complex.

Well, technically, an instant doesn't get any bigger if an instant is added to it. An instant is a particular moment of time, not a length of time. It is 0 seconds, not 0.5 or 0.00005 or any other actual amount. You are on stronger ground with Pray for More, but it is difficult to envision this happening any other way apart from that the character only prays once, even though the power is used many times. He can't see the results before applying them.

I realise we're discussing fluff here, but this is the fluff that a GM could reasonably use to dismiss or allow this combo. As we are doing this, it is important to realise that any sane GM will NOT allow this combo (except as a one-off event as a simple congratulations to its creator/user). It is almost irrelevant to say "but a GM could disbar it" as they all will.

This necessary GM discretion does not detract from the aesthetic value of this theoretical build. It is most definitely a worthy move and (sadly) adds to the exposure of another embarrassing rule (Divine Miracle) that needs patched/updated/errata'd.
Man, i really like 4e but the more i come and read these boards the more discouraged I get. This edition is gonna be a house rule nightmare and require the printing of a book with nothing but errata (more money for them i guess). Sadly all this will only get worse with more books. At least the 3.5ers can rejoice, your broken game still exists.
Well, technically, an instant doesn't get any bigger if an instant is added to it. An instant is a particular moment of time, not a length of time. It is 0 seconds, not 0.5 or 0.00005 or any other actual amount. You are on stronger ground with Pray for More, but it is difficult to envision this happening any other way apart from that the character only prays once, even though the power is used many times. He can't see the results before applying them.

This is not a discussion about infinitesimals, free actions take a finite amount of time and they definitely add up. "Speaking a few sentences" is a free action, giving a long speech is not.

Man, i really like 4e but the more i come and read these boards the more discouraged I get. This edition is gonna be a house rule nightmare and require the printing of a book with nothing but errata (more money for them i guess). Sadly all this will only get worse with more books. At least the 3.5ers can rejoice, your broken game still exists.

Not really, 4E is mostly balanced, unless in what, 5 cases?
Divine Miracle looks to me to be the obvious broken factor in this particular combination. The designers didn't consider that some encounter powers are free actions.

Off-hand the simplest solution is to simply alter Divine Miracle to say that you recover the use of an encounter power "at the end of your turn". That, hopefully, prevents this sort of infinite loop of free action encounter powers while still keeping Divine Miracle mostly intact in terms of how useful it is.
This is not a discussion about infinitesimals, free actions take a finite amount of time and they definitely add up. "Speaking a few sentences" is a free action, giving a long speech is not.

Well, you may wish to avoid that part of the discussion, and I certainly understand your reasons for doing so (it would probably be terribly dull). But as your argument relies upon it, it's probably cogent.

Notwithstanding, I shall respect your wishes and stay away from that particular topic. My main point, though, is perfectly valid: regardless of whether or not these actions take finite time (I do not believe that is the case, certainly for the elven reroll), some kind of screwy time bending disjunction between the "setting reality" and the "game flow" certainly happens when they are used.

Consider: in both cases, the player decides to use the power after the roll he is affecting has been made. But the character could not use the power then; they would have to have used it before (or simultaneous with) the action that committed the roll.

With a bow-based example, the character does not see the attack fail, then decide to pull the arrow telekinetically back to his bow and shoot again (or at least, this is certainly not supported by the fluff-text). He doesn't fire a second arrow (only one unit of ammunition is used). I don't believe the power is meant to represent him rewinding time.

It's a game-construct, meant to represent the fact that for this particular shot, the attacker happened to use that extra bit of concentration, or got particularly lucky. Multiple uses of it don't have to take longer in the "setting reality" that the character experiences, even though they do flow sequentially in the "game flow" that the player experiences. Because each time the effect is used, it re-edits the sequence of events that the character experiences.

Okay, even while avoiding a discussion of infinitesimals, this still got pretty boring... the main point remains that the fact that a GM can effectively "Rule-0" this is kind of irrelevant, because every GM will. But RAW and RAI, it stands.
A power is expended when it has been used completely. Divine Miracle triggers when you have expended your last remaining encounter power. I once again don't see why this is an issue.

The duration of all three powers are instantaneous. i.e. all exactly the same amount of time, whatever that is. So at the exact same time that your reroll has been used completely, your attack has concluded.

Which means that while you may have gotten your rerolls back, there is no longer an attack to apply them to...
Well, you may wish to avoid that part of the discussion, and I certainly understand your reasons for doing so (it would probably be terribly dull). But as your argument relies upon it, it's probably cogent.

Notwithstanding, I shall respect your wishes and stay away from that particular topic. My main point, though, is perfectly valid: regardless of whether or not these actions take finite time (I do not believe that is the case, certainly for the elven reroll), some kind of screwy time bending disjunction between the "setting reality" and the "game flow" certainly happens when they are used.

Consider: in both cases, the player decides to use the power after the roll he is affecting has been made. But the character could not use the power then; they would have to have used it before (or simultaneous with) the action that committed the roll.

With a bow-based example, the character does not see the attack fail, then decide to pull the arrow telekinetically back to his bow and shoot again (or at least, this is certainly not supported by the fluff-text). He doesn't fire a second arrow (only one unit of ammunition is used). I don't believe the power is meant to represent him rewinding time.

It's a game-construct, meant to represent the fact that for this particular shot, the attacker happened to use that extra bit of concentration, or got particularly lucky. Multiple uses of it don't have to take longer in the "setting reality" that the character experiences, even though they do flow sequentially in the "game flow" that the player experiences. Because each time the effect is used, it re-edits the sequence of events that the character experiences.

Okay, even while avoiding a discussion of infinitesimals, this still got pretty boring... the main point remains that the fact that a GM can effectively "Rule-0" this is kind of irrelevant, because every GM will. But RAW and RAI, it stands.

Yes, in fact I completely agree with your point. I was just pointing out the fact that there are clear examples of free actions that take nonzero time, which is a nice way of seeing why there should be a cap on them.

By the way, I've asked CustServ about Divine Miracle. I'll post the answer when I get it.
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