Tenets of the Raven Queen

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I'm currently playing a Wizard / MC Cleric of the Raven Queen, but I am talking with my DM about having him switch over to a cleric of the raven queen (our group needs it, I think).

What I was curious about is other people takes on the Raven Queen. If you guys could take some time to answer some questions about how you envision the Raven Queen, it would help me and my DM figure out what I am supposed to do as a worldly servant of hers.

1.) We know she views undeath as a unnatural and cheating her out of the souls that are rightfully hers. What other things does she consider "cheating death"? What about resurrections not performed by her clerics? What about powerful mages who use magic to extend their lives?

2.) She believes death is a natural part of life. Does that mean her followers would view murder as just another way for someone to die, or as killing someone before their time? Furthermore, does she even care about "their time", or does she just want the dead to stay dead?

3.) Aside from killing undead and respecting death, what else do followers of the Raven Queen do all day? Do good deeds? Do bad deeds? Do whatever pleases them? Something in between?

4.) What does she do with the dead? Does she deliver them to their god for judgment? Does she judge them herself? Does she get to keep any of them to herself?

5.) And finally, if you could offer up any other interesting ideas about how you (or your fellow players, DM, etc.) view the Raven Queen.

Thanks in advance.
1.) I don't know that she views undeath as abomination because she feels entitled to the souls. I think her attitude towards the dead is simpler - dead souls should be allowed to rest. Undeath cheats the souls, not her. Resurrections are a restoration of life, not a perversion of death.

2.) I doubt she cares much about the way people die. Murder is probably equal to plague in her eyes. It's not her concern, she cares about what comes after. My Paladin who worships her captured a hobgoblin after a battle. When it became clear that he might become a burden on the group, I killed him in cold blood. Then I performed the proper ceremonies to send him safely into the afterlife.

3.) Perform funerals, give last rites, perhaps some console the bereaved, ward their towns against the undead, ease the suffering of the dying. The first thing my Paladin does when our group comes across a battle in progress or corpses otherwise left to rot is perform the proper rites. Well, second thing. Combat is usually the first thing. Having a fire source helps with this.

4.) I doubt we're meant to know exactly what's going to happen after death. I'd leave this up to your DM.

5.) It's not about emotions or desires. It's about the natural order. While in the wild, you watch, detached, as predator torments, kills and eats prey. You don't interfere, because it's the natural way. In this strained analogy, those who inflict the curse of undeath are like poachers. They disrupt the natural order. She looks neither to hasten death nor to prevent it, only to ensure that it rules where it must and appears where it is needed.
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I'm currently playing a Wizard / MC Cleric of the Raven Queen, but I am talking with my DM about having him switch over to a cleric of the raven queen (our group needs it, I think).

What I was curious about is other people takes on the Raven Queen. If you guys could take some time to answer some questions about how you envision the Raven Queen, it would help me and my DM figure out what I am supposed to do as a worldly servant of hers.

1.) We know she views undeath as a unnatural and cheating her out of the souls that are rightfully hers. What other things does she consider "cheating death"? What about resurrections not performed by her clerics? What about powerful mages who use magic to extend their lives?

2.) She believes death is a natural part of life. Does that mean her followers would view murder as just another way for someone to die, or as killing someone before their time? Furthermore, does she even care about "their time", or does she just want the dead to stay dead?

3.) Aside from killing undead and respecting death, what else do followers of the Raven Queen do all day? Do good deeds? Do bad deeds? Do whatever pleases them? Something in between?

4.) What does she do with the dead? Does she deliver them to their god for judgment? Does she judge them herself? Does she get to keep any of them to herself?

5.) And finally, if you could offer up any other interesting ideas about how you (or your fellow players, DM, etc.) view the Raven Queen.

Thanks in advance.



1.) not just undead, but people like dorian grey, some warlocks who offer their soul to orcus for imortality (vampire ritual I know) people who transfer their souls to animated shells (the golem episode of gargoyles) fate spinners from 3rd edition.

2.) she is the goddess of fate as well if it is their fate to die at this time, so be it, a great plot hook would be when the cleric or paladin find their sword passes right through someone who is fated not to die then, bbeg and such, make them screma in frustration that the goddess has something greater planned for the villian.

3.) those who follow the RQ, follow their fate and the fate of others. Often do I have them act as fatespinners and fortune tellers to ammuse children and make the adults aware of their lives. also they might wander the world performing last rites and requests for the condemed, I had a paladin who did that.
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He carried a wooden shield as well as his metal shield, when he went to a town he would go to the prison to perform confession for the damned and doomed. any last things to be put in order he would write down and tack to his shield like a post-it board and often for sidequests he would seek to perform last wishes of the doomed. The best time was when he met this elf who was doomed to life in prison, he gave the paladin a list of three things to do: Tell his daughter he was sorry, eat a good meal, fall in love. The paladin did all three in one swop when he met his future half elven wife.


4.) I think it says somewhere in the core books that all souls fall to the shadowfell, from there they seperate to their gods, almost like a mail sorting room or a subway station. Those who follow the raven queen serve to assist the passage of other souls either by comforting the others untill their god comes for them or perhaps even a "soul society"[bleach] like system.
For those of us with some 3e mileage, I think she's often considered to be
Wee Jas in a Funny Hat.
For those of us with some 3e mileage, I think she's often considered to be
Wee Jas in a Funny Hat.

I would have to agree but she has a cape too now dont forget the cape. I liked Wee Jas better though cause she was a goddess of magic too.

And to add to the convorsation I think that fallowers of the raven queen simply are not botherd by the mortality of themselves or others. If they see someone dying a slow painfull death they may walk over and ask if they would like a dagger to the face or even simply be told that they shouldnt fear because the raven queen would protect them in the next realm.
Great thread. I too have questions similar to the OP.

Does a follower of the Raven Queen feel it is her divine intent that they slay undead when they see them? Is all undead considered this way, or are the more inanimate undead (zombies and skeletons) considered differently than the more intelligent undead who presumably have used necromancy to cheat death through undeath?

Would a follower of the Raven Queen cast Raise Dead on a fellow PC? Would they ask their fellow PCs to raise them if they fall? Would they actively seek to prevent fellow PCs (or powerful NPCs for that matter) from raising others?

Based on what little is provided in the PH plus the snippets I've pulled from other sources books (MM, Martial Power, etc..), I remain very confused about what the Raven Queen would expect of her followers.
Moreover, what does the Raven Queen think of the other gods. Martial Power indicates she and Corellon are enemies, which makes sense given he is sort of the god of life and creation, which covers birth, as well as the patron of Spring. She'd also probably be opposed to Pelor too, considering his pro-life stance and the fact that summer and winter are diametrically opposed. Kord's probably okay in her book, because people die in battle, and thus become her purview. She'd hate Vecna for obvious reasons.

One big issue I have with 4e is that we don't really know how the gods interact with each other, or how their churches interact with each other? Who's allied with whom? Who's who's enemies? The books don't say!
Great question Zousha! How would a follower of the Raven Queen react to/work with a follower of Pelor for example? Would they hate one another and be in conflict? Or would the get along great, especially if they were tasked with combating Undead?
It is interesting. Other than that one reference in "Martial Power", concerning the Raven Queen's Sorrowreaver and the follower of Corellon, I don't really see anything that would require Corellon and the Raven Queen to be at odds.

Corellon is the god of spring, beauty and the arts. None of that would seem to be offensive to the Raven Queen. I'd have an easier time believing that Avandra and the Raven Queen would be at odds, because Avandra's freedom and take fate into your own hands could be construed as don't let "death" deny you your freedom. That is just one of many possible interpretations though.
Has anyone here ever seen "Dead Like Me?" While not exactly the same (in a lot of ways), I think the Raven Queen would be more concerned with the soul of the dead making its appointment, rather than the way the soul is freed from the body. Sometimes this is from a natural death, a bear mauling, a piano being dropped on your head...but when its your time, it's your time. If it is NOT your time or you "miss" your appt...well, there are consequences.

As far as deities, I think we're going to have to hope that Wizards did it so that the DMs could have free reign and connect the deities as they wish and not just leave a gaping hole where a book conveniently fits. Maybe you can make them all siblings, maybe they are are diametrically opposed to each other...I personally would have the Raven Queen and Pelor not hate each other: without life there is no death and vice versa. I would say that one sees the other as the other side of the coin.
If it's a gaping hole where a book conveniently fits then they better fill it pretty damn quick. I play religious characters a lot and if I have no idea how a deity's church is structured and how members of it behave I have no guidelines for roleplaying and then I don't know if I'm doing it right.
Once again, it's not as there's any shortage of material about Wee Jas.
So unless there's an explicit contradiction (such as some of the attitudes about undead) I think it's a safe assumption that all that still applies.

Even when the context has changed, It's pretty common sense, like humans who worship Corellon using the same rites as the elves previously have.
I explain it as thus:

Upon Ioun's induction into the pantheon and the subsequent absorbing of Boccob's portfolio, WeeJas, tired of the negative press, absconded her magic portion and retreated into solitude for some time. Without a neutral presence in the art of necromancy, Nerull and Vecna began to fight for the right to control souls. Upon her return, Wee Jas came and saw the horrors the two had wreaked upon the material plane and destroyed Nerull (vecna having narrowly escaped by appealing to Wee Jas ideals of knowledge, thereby cementing himself as a sort of peer of hers (if only for a very short time)), absorbing his essence. Henceforth, she became the new goddess of death and changed her name to better suit her new position.
I like that, and I may steal it. I always pictured Orcus breaking Nerull across his knee, since he's now impervious to death.

But as per the OP's question, The Raven Queen's temples borrow heavily from previous Wee Jas canon, I'm guessing?
I didn't play 3rd Edition (not much anyway) and don't have access to any Wee Jas canon. So if I was playing a Wee Jas Priest, would I ask people to raise me from the dead if I'm slain or not? Would I attack undead on sight or not? Would I discourage others from being raised and consider the raise dead ritual to be blasphemy against my god...or not?

Thank you in advance for any assistance you can provide.
Has anyone here ever seen "Dead Like Me?" While not exactly the same (in a lot of ways), I think the Raven Queen would be more concerned with the soul of the dead making its appointment, rather than the way the soul is freed from the body. Sometimes this is from a natural death, a bear mauling, a piano being dropped on your head...but when its your time, it's your time. If it is NOT your time or you "miss" your appt...well, there are consequences.

As far as deities, I think we're going to have to hope that Wizards did it so that the DMs could have free reign and connect the deities as they wish and not just leave a gaping hole where a book conveniently fits. Maybe you can make them all siblings, maybe they are are diametrically opposed to each other...I personally would have the Raven Queen and Pelor not hate each other: without life there is no death and vice versa. I would say that one sees the other as the other side of the coin.

I have not seen "Dead like Me" but I will add it to my rent list...thanks!

So based on the movie interpretation, how would the Raven Queen feel about one of her Paladins being slain in a valiant battle against the undead forces of Orcus and then being raised back to life (after he had already stepped off the holy road to the unknown) by a Priest of say...Pelor? Is that cool with her, because it's not necromancy just restoring life for a time....or is she massively annoyed because her servant's soul was just torn back onto the holy road...pure blasphemy against her tenets?

I honestly don't know the answer to that question. I honestly don't have much of a preference for the answer to that question, other than if I tell my Raven Queen worshipping PCs that they can't ask for people to raise them and even actively seek to stop others from raising the dead, then that is a significant handicap and I'll have to modify the game accordingly to account for that weakness.
I have not seen "Dead like Me" but I will add it to my rent list...thanks!

So based on the movie interpretation, how would the Raven Queen feel about one of her Paladins being slain in a valiant battle against the undead forces of Orcus and then being raised back to life (after he had already stepped off the holy road to the unknown) by a Priest of say...Pelor? Is that cool with her, because it's not necromancy just restoring life for a time....or is she massively annoyed because her servant's soul was just torn back onto the holy road...pure blasphemy against her tenets?

I honestly don't know the answer to that question. I honestly don't have much of a preference for the answer to that question, other than if I tell my Raven Queen worshipping PCs that they can't ask for people to raise them and even actively seek to stop others from raising the dead, then that is a significant handicap and I'll have to modify the game accordingly to account for that weakness.

If I have gotten one person to watch "Dead Like Me," then my work here is done.

I feel like it goes back to the appt thing. If it is your time to die, it is your time to die. If it is not and you do die, I feel like that would cause a stir in the cosmos as well. When someone is being raised, they know that they are being summoned and can refuse. The ritual being done does not guarantee a restored comrade, and in addition to this the gods can intervene. This can make for a good RP session of the dead comrade talking with a representative of their god; maybe they are told it is not their time and that they should go back. Hell, maybe it is their time to die and they decide for the greater good, they will take on whatever the Raven Queen throws at them. The Priest of Pelor can try to bring the fallen person back. The person can refuse, the Raven Queen would still have her soul and the priest will hopefully have learned their lesson.

PS: Dead Like Me is a tv show. Definitely worth watching. And this thread has my brain brewing in regards to a paladin of the Raven Queen...too many ideas, not enough games...*sigh*
too many ideas, not enough games...*sigh*

A more truthful statement has not been uttered

Thanks for the ideas. I have been toying with the idea myself that perhaps mortals don't really understand what the gods rules are as it pertains to the raising of the dead. Perhaps it is a ritual that frequently doesn't work because the only souls that the Raven Queen will release back to the holy road are those that she deems have not achieved their fate or something like that. This would have the added benefit of solving one of my other problems...that being why noble rulers ever die and get replaced. With Raise Dead around, why even worry about falling battle? As long as your troops can get you back to your priest, they will raise you. But if this is dependent upon the Raven Queen (and/or other gods) determination that your worthy, then suddenly death is real again and NPCs wouldn't rely upon it?
A more truthful statement has not been uttered

Thanks for the ideas. I have been toying with the idea myself that perhaps mortals don't really understand what the gods rules are as it pertains to the raising of the dead. Perhaps it is a ritual that frequently doesn't work because the only souls that the Raven Queen will release back to the holy road are those that she deems have not achieved their fate or something like that. This would have the added benefit of solving one of my other problems...that being why noble rulers ever die and get replaced. With Raise Dead around, why even worry about falling battle? As long as your troops can get you back to your priest, they will raise you. But if this is dependent upon the Raven Queen (and/or other gods) determination that your worthy, then suddenly death is real again and NPCs wouldn't rely upon it?

Im this is how i've played it since the early days of 3e when i started DM'ing.

As for the Raven Queen's Tenets....
Nobody knows. It depends on which follower of hers you ask. Like in the real world, nobodys sure what the gods' commands actually are, and there might be a thousand different forms of Raven Queen worship, and a thousand different interpretations of her commands to go with them. One church might condemn Raise Dead as unholy, while another might task its followers to keep the innocent (particularly children) from dying by any means necessary, and thus preventing them from dying before their time. Depends on the church.

Theological schisms are pretty common in any faith. No reason D&D should be any different.

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/23.jpg)

I was just reading the Raven Herald PP for the Rogues in MP, and I found a passage stating that basically, an important part of the Raven Queen's teachings are that death is the ultimate equalizer in the universe and that it is OK to overthrow the prideful or the wicked.

I also found a passage saying that undead, in and of themselves, are not offensive the the Raven Queen. So I think we can interpret this to say that random zombies and skeletons that are animated with dark magics are not as offensive as the necromancer that raised them or a sentient undead such as a vampire or a lich.
Undead and the Raven Queen

Grundel has the right idea. The Raven Queen is much more upset at somebody raising undead, then the actual undead themselves.

People always question why there are undead in the shadowfell if the Raven Queen is all about Death. Simply put she doesnt feel all undead are unnatural.

It is kind of like the history of the Yakuza in Japan (japanese mafia.) Historically the government is aware of their activities, and allows them to exists. Why you may ask? Because there will always be a portion of society that will be drawn to crime, or cannot do the 8-5 shift everyday. The japanese will allow crime to be focused and controlled, so that way the rest of the society is shockingly crime-free.
If the Yakuza get out of line, then the government will try and knock them back down a peg.

So I see the raven queen as allowing undead, especially those in her realm, to exist because it allows everything else to function. It is a natural by-product that some souls will not pass over, and remain in the shadowfell as undead.

Now if Necromancer's start raising armies, or Orcus wants to convert all dead to non-dead, or a group of Nightwalkers starts to get out of control...you better believe she will have her followers take them down a peg.
As for the Raven Queen's Tenets....
Nobody knows. It depends on which follower of hers you ask. Like in the real world, nobodys sure what the gods' commands actually are, and there might be a thousand different forms of Raven Queen worship, and a thousand different interpretations of her commands to go with them. One church might condemn Raise Dead as unholy, while another might task its followers to keep the innocent (particularly children) from dying by any means necessary, and thus preventing them from dying before their time. Depends on the church.

Theological schisms are pretty common in any faith. No reason D&D should be any different.

Yes, I can agree with this in part. But I do wonder if it would (could?) be different in a fantasy environment, where Divine magic is a clear and present force in the world. In our reality, religion is all about faith and whatever you've been taught. There are no magic powers that prove there is a god and therefore, no obvious measuring stick for whether you've deviated significantly from what your god would expect you to do.

If the Raven Queen REALLY thought that Undead were an abomination, and there were a whole group of creatures that were worshipping her but also being necromancers and creating undead, than that wouldn't make sense would it? In that situation, she would reject their worship and refuse to grant them her divine power...wouldn't she? In the very least, she would find some way to communicate her expectations and beliefs to them through their priests. And if the priests were ignoring her wishes, she would stop providing them divine power.

This would suggest to me that certain core concepts of the gods would not be in dispute. Worshippers of Tiamat would understand that "Greed" is there thing. Worshippers of Yeenoghu would understand that "Wanton Slaughter" is there thing. Followers of the Raven Queen would have similar clarity...wouldn't they?

In my case, my PCs are asking me to tell them what the Raven Queen expects of them. How far does their hatred of Undead go? Would they have their fellow adventurers raise them from the dead? Would they obtain the raise dead ritual and cast it on their fellow adventurers? I have a modicum of creativity and I have no problem making is up, except that if down the line WoTC publishes something truly interesting that I'd like to use but can't because they have assumed the exact opposite of the direction I took, then that becomes frustrating. I'd rather know the answers to these rather basic questions up front...if such answers exist.

Perhaps they don't though...

Don't get me wrong...the idea of theological differences between sects is interesting. Priests of the Raven Queen in different communities bashing each other as blashphemers or overly strict zealots based on points of doctrine and scripture. But at some point, it speaks to the core element of the god and then it starts to make less sense to me.
I fail to see why anyone would worship her. It doesn't seem to protect you from early death (as her dogma is more "You die when you are supposed to die" and it doesn't look like she will rewrite the timetable for her worshippers). And as adventurer I would hate to have a cleric of the raven queen at my side who might decide that my time is up and not heal me.

Also, as the revolving door out of the afterlive is still operating and swinging faster than ever with the cheap raise dead ritual, adventurers likely don't see death as the unshakable fact as the rest of the population does.
I actually could see why people would choose to worship the Raven Queen. Especially among the peasants, whose every day life is full of life and death. We have to remember that "death" is not evil and "life" is not good. Death is mostly feared because it comes with the factor of the unknown. How better way to help yourself deal with the unknown by worshipping the person who has the information you lack? It would be unrealistic for people not to acknowledge her because people throughout history have always sought to know what happens after they die and try to prepare for it.

Death is more of an inconvenience when you're a player; you have to roll up a new character and do the legwork that comes with it. But for an adventurer to not even face the fact that they might die is kind of ridiculous. And a cleric of the Raven Queen can raise you from the dead; if you weren't supposed to die (remember, the raven queen is the spinner of fate; she knows how lives are supposed to end), I think she would actually be ****** if you did. Perhaps that is how some of the more gnarly undead are made: deaths that were not supposed to occur happening. An evil overlord kills an entire village full of people. Wasn't really on the timetable. That portion of land is now haunted.

This is a bit all over the place but meh...I haven't had all my coffee for the day yet.
Agreed Triss,

Shadar-Kai can even be granted immortality by the Raven Queen (sorrowswarm).

Some may wonder why the Raven Queen would give immortatlity to those who suppossedly worship her for her liberal killing policy, but she needs loyal leaders of the faith.

She generally doesnt make you undead, but instead an immortal shadow and one with her realm. If your primary enemies are demons and undead, dont you think you need to give some shelf-life to your most loyal followers!?

Part of every religion is survival.

Edit---Why would people want to worship the raven queen???

Easy, she represents death and the resting of the soul. Many people find hope in knowing that when they die, their souls are preserved and go to 'a better place'. People want that maintained.

With Orcus and Vecna running around, people worry that when they die they will arise as undead abominations, or worse. That they will live an eternity in pain in the clutches of demons....

So there would be many people that would worship the raven queen, because they value the eternity of their soul, and the faith that the shadowfell will provide protection for it as it passes to some further plane.
I am considerably out of date, and am not familiar with the Raven Queen. What I know is generally the basics of Wee Jas' tenets, which is that She is a demanding goddess of order.
Coming from Acheron, the mainstay and single most defining rule is that, "Order comes before weal or woe."

In that respect, I would believe that whether She is friends with various other deities, would depend upon their sense of order. She may not be friends with Pelor, but I doubt they would be enemies.
I could even imagine the two forming an alliance to strike at a mutual enemy.

But, as I said, I am considerably out of date on the subject, and am not familiar with Raven Queen. If someone can fill me in on what Wee Jas has been up to since 3.0, or direct me to an online resource where I can be brought up to speed,
I would appreciate it.

I feel that when it comes down to it, it is a goddess' followers who ultimately decide what her portfolios are (thinking back to the Twin Cataclysms, and Wee Jas acquiring the Death Portfolio through mortal action).
I'm currently playing a Wizard / MC Cleric of the Raven Queen, but I am talking with my DM about having him switch over to a cleric of the raven queen (our group needs it, I think).

First of, let me be the first to give you congrates, takes alot to change your class because the team needs it, I solute you, hopefully your DM is more understanding though.
What I was curious about is other people takes on the Raven Queen. If you guys could take some time to answer some questions about how you envision the Raven Queen, it would help me and my DM figure out what I am supposed to do as a worldly servant of hers.

Difrent peple have difernt oppinions, here are mine.

1.) We know she views undeath as a unnatural and cheating her out of the souls that are rightfully hers. What other things does she consider "cheating death"? What about resurrections not performed by her clerics? What about powerful mages who use magic to extend their lives?

Raise Dead, I don't beleave so, sense you are needed with a greater cause that will undoutedly unbalance naturl forces. I think she would make few exeptions though. As for the powerful mage, most likely she would. If you are like "I'm going to live forever" expect to she Shadar-Kai in the near futer, and even unnaturaly proloning you life.

2.) She believes death is a natural part of life. Does that mean her followers would view murder as just another way for someone to die, or as killing someone before their time? Furthermore, does she even care about "their time", or does she just want the dead to stay dead?

I beleave that would be a Unnatural death, although it might have been their time to go, if it was in cold blood, then most likly she would view it negitivly, this isn't the 3.5 Evil Deity of death anymore, I beleave some people are haveing a hard time ajusting from that.

3.) Aside from killing undead and respecting death, what else do followers of the Raven Queen do all day? Do good deeds? Do bad deeds? Do whatever pleases them? Something in between?

Well, they do what other people would to; treasure hunt, go adventureing, save the world a few times. Although, I would imagen that they would give a proper barial to "save the departed from the curse of the undeath." So, if you kill off a bandit you gave a chance to go and live, but refuses, then you give him a barial, even if he doesn't deserve it.

4.) What does she do with the dead? Does she deliver them to their god for judgment? Does she judge them herself? Does she get to keep any of them to herself?

That is somthing I don't know. I beleave she leads them to an eternal santurary kinda like Vallhala for Norse Mythology.

5.) And finally, if you could offer up any other interesting ideas about how you (or your fellow players, DM, etc.) view the Raven Queen. Thanks in advance.

Well, like I said, I veiw her compleatly diffrent. My Idea's is that it is that the Paladins and Cleric's try everything in there power to save someone, but if they are unable, then they can say "the raven queen wanted it so." Sence she stoped you from helping them. Dont be like the majority who go around slaying every innicent person in the name of the raven queen or just sit there and do nothing. Natural death = Desease, Old Age, and Battle. If you prevent one of those three, then it wasn't there time. If you kill an innicent without them being armed or anything (aka Cold Blood) then I would beleave she looks down on that because it wasn't a "natural" death.

Remeber, this isn;t the ebil, kill everything in sight, deity from 3.5, but a new 4.0 were she is nither good nor evil and doesn't say "save every life" or "kill everyone in sight."
But, as I said, I am considerably out of date on the subject, and am not familiar with Raven Queen. If someone can fill me in on what Wee Jas has been up to since 3.0, or direct me to an online resource where I can be brought up to speed, I would appreciate it.

That's a hard question to answer, not least because of the nature of the goddess herself. IMAGE(http://www.greyhawkonline.com/wogcomic/title/wogstrip25a.jpg)

The other part is that the Raven Queen might occupy a totally separate timeline, it's still too early to say. The dogmas would still probably have more than a few points in common, however.
That's a hard question to answer, not least because of the nature of the goddess herself. IMAGE(http://www.greyhawkonline.com/wogcomic/title/wogstrip25a.jpg)

The other part is that the Raven Queen might occupy a totally separate timeline, it's still too early to say. The dogmas would still probably have more than a few points in common, however.

So basically Wee Jas had to declare deity bankruptcy, and as part of her portfolio reshuffling (*heh*) had to restructure as the Raven Queen to avoid legal complications.


Makes sense to me.