Weirdest Character Concepts?

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I like weird characters, so I was wondering:

A- What's the Weirdest Character Concept you've played or seen played?
B- How did it work in the game?
C- Given the chance would you use it again?
D- What is your favorite event in the characters career?

For me it was my friend playing a Half-Elf that was either possesed or had Multiple Personality Disorder (we never figured out which) Anyway he wrote up 6 characters using the same Attribute Numbers, and would roll a D6 at random (at the end of his turn during encounters) to see which he used.

He had a Fighter, Rogue, Wizard, Ranger, Barbarian, Bard, and each had their own personalities and skill selection.

It was one of those hit or miss things, it could have been so broken it was hated by everyone, but mainly do to the skill of the player and the DM it worked really well.

The only real drawback was the little extra time the player had to take in combat. This was offset by just how much fun it was to have this guy in the party.

If I had the chance to play with this character in the party again I would, but as much as I'd love to try it, I know I'm not a good enough RPer to pull it off myself.

I'm not sure what my favorite event is, it's a tossup between:

The Bard who had very high social skills, (Bluff, Diplomacy, etc) was trying to talk us out of being caught breaking into the city treasury, when he switched to the Rogue (who was a clyptomaniac) and chose to grab a bag of jewels and run away.

Or the time he had the barbarian raging and charged in with his greatsword only to miss the ogre and turn into the wizard.
Wow. Just WOW.

That is the most awesome character ever created...
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That is. I may have to steal that one...

Anyways, my friend once played a spellscale wildmage in a game I was running. Okay nothing to weird there, at least until you look at his combat tactics. He used a weapon. People call it a Rod of Wonder (we used a greater version, somewhere on wizards here). He got to two rolls on it a got to pick because of the wildmage's control over random chance. I wouldn't mind seeing a similar character done again. He would also sometimes just randomly use the rod. He ended up being purple and changing genders at one point (with no reliable way to reverse it). He once also managed to force cage a elder earth elemental with it. It was always fun just wondering what would happen next. Although a lot of times in combat he had some pretty useless turns. We also used the character as a scapegoat to explain a new method of dealing with missing players I was trying out: A lever would appear in the dungeon, and the missing player's character would have uncontrollable compulsion to pull it, and then proceed to disappear, and would later come back letting go of the lever. We decided this was a crazy invention of the wild mage that got out of control, which is how he (at least, he was a "he" at that point in time) joined the party: he got caught by one of the crazy levers he unleashed upon the world and ended up in the dungeon right with the party looking very confused.
That is. I may have to steal that one...

Anyways, my friend once played a spellscale wildmage in a game I was running. Okay nothing to weird there, at least until you look at his combat tactics. He used a weapon. People call it a Rod of Wonder (we used a greater version, somewhere on wizards here). He got to two rolls on it a got to pick because of the wildmage's control over random chance. I wouldn't mind seeing a similar character done again. He would also sometimes just randomly use the rod. He ended up being purple and changing genders at one point (with no reliable way to reverse it). He once also managed to force cage a elder earth elemental with it. It was always fun just wondering what would happen next. Although a lot of times in combat he had some pretty useless turns. We also used the character as a scapegoat to explain a new method of dealing with missing players I was trying out: A lever would appear in the dungeon, and the missing player's character would have uncontrollable compulsion to pull it, and then proceed to disappear, and would later come back letting go of the lever. We decided this was a crazy invention of the wild mage that got out of control, which is how he (at least, he was a "he" at that point in time) joined the party: he got caught by one of the crazy levers he unleashed upon the world and ended up in the dungeon right with the party looking very confused.

Sounds like a real fun character to have around, I really like the magic lever idea.
I'm not sure how weird you'd consider that, but I once played a sociopathic, psychotic, half demon who got subjected to a sanctify the wicked spell (see Book of Exalted deeds). Basicly, that spell converts an evil creature/character to good.

But being a devil who didn't even understand he concept of good, this had strange results.
He openly claims to being evil, behaving like a jerk, but inexpliquably did good actions. He always came with some convulted explanation to his actions.

One of his best quotes was during a trial in a rather backwards and xenophobic community where one of the PCs (a dark elf rogue, not evil) was being unjustly accused of a murder and the prosecutor claimed that all dark elves were born evil and so forth. That gave a fit to my character:

"Now that just plain bull**** !!! Evil is not something people are born with. It is an ideal towards wich one must work very hard each day to attain. To an exterior observer, evil looks easy and natural to some. But they are wrong ! It is a testing path, a hard fight. These words you speak are an insult to all those who have commited themselves to that hard work. I demand, in the name of all those you have just insulted that you issue a apology !"


The expressions on the GM and the other player's faces was simply priceless. I only regret I didn't have a camera for that one.
That was an awesome statement. I wish you had had a camera too.

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71235715 wrote:
I also wish you had a camera.
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I once had two players that decided to play the two heads of an Ettin. One was a Shaman (OA), the other a Frenzied Berserker. Each took his own standard action but they shared the move action.

The character ended up a complete mess but it had been really fun!
"Now that just plain bull**** !!! Evil is not something people are born with. It is an ideal towards wich one must work very hard each day to attain. To an exterior observer, evil looks easy and natural to some. But they are wrong ! It is a testing path, a hard fight. These words you speak are an insult to all those who have commited themselves to that hard work. I demand, in the name of all those you have just insulted that you issue a apology !"

Can I put this in my sig? You will be credited of course.
As a matter of fact that would do very nicely in my sig...
I am Blue/Green
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Take The Magic Dual Colour Test - Beta today!
Created with Rum and Monkey's Personality Test Generator.
I am both rational and instinctive. I value self-knowledge and understanding of the world; my ultimate goal is self-improvement and improvement of the world around me. At best, I am focused and methodical; at worst, I am obsessive and amoral.
Sure, go ahead. Imitation is the sincerest form of flatery after all.

Another fun one some friends of mine made was as followed:

- In a evilish group we once had, one of my friends started by making a character that was basicly a huge drunkard. Loved booze, women, more booze, bar fights, even more booze....

- In the next game, he had brought two of his friends round, and since we didn't have time to make two other characters, they just played the boozehound, at three. We therefore ended up with a three personality drunkard that was always arguing with himself. We kept it that way for the whole campaign.
I once had two players that decided to play the two heads of an Ettin. One was a Shaman (OA), the other a Frenzied Berserker. Each took his own standard action but they shared the move action.

The character ended up a complete mess but it had been really fun!

Awesome, that's just awesome.

Abel_Knightlord, I also wish you had the camera.

Originally Posted by Abel_Knightlord
"Now that just plain bull**** !!! Evil is not something people are born with. It is an ideal towards wich one must work very hard each day to attain. To an exterior observer, evil looks easy and natural to some. But they are wrong ! It is a testing path, a hard fight. These words you speak are an insult to all those who have commited themselves to that hard work. I demand, in the name of all those you have just insulted that you issue a apology !"

Going in my sig as well if you don't mind.
Heh, one of my favorite characters was a 2e Avenger (can't remember what supplement that came from, was probably Ravenloft, though the campaign itself was just a home campaign), who was vengeful against criminals. This didn't synergize well with the party's Thief, who I ended up chasing all around town at night trying to get him to place back something he stole; or, failing that, kill him.

Best event was with a different character (still 2e). It was a one-shot high level campaign, and I played a mage. The opening fight was against a dragon, which we slayed easily. Then, another character (an arcane caster of some sort I think, though not a mage) took the head of the dragon to the king of the city, claimed he killed it by himself and demanded payment for his services.

Long story short, he got himself entangled in the local political process rather quickly, declared himself the ruler, and I lead the resistance against him. My familiar was a skunk that was hidden in the castle and spying on them. At one point I paid a bandit to enter the castle disguised as me to try to murder the other player, but he saw through the disguise quickly and killed the bandit. At another point I had the skunk go on a suicide bomb and stink up the whole place, quickly getting murdered by guards afterward.

There was some kind of final war and the DM described the final battle between my and the other character as rather epic, and our ghosts haunted the ruins of the city forever battling each other.
It reminds me of LoEG's Mr. Hyde. A perfect bastard that has to make do with appearing noble in his demise.
"Now that just plain bull**** !!! Evil is not something people are born with. It is an ideal towards wich one must work very hard each day to attain. To an exterior observer, evil looks easy and natural to some. But they are wrong ! It is a testing path, a hard fight. These words you speak are an insult to all those who have commited themselves to that hard work. I demand, in the name of all those you have just insulted that you issue a apology !"

Man, that was awesome... Gone to my sig.
My brother's character from 2e days:

Born Bjorn Greatstart, Bjorn was nicknamed Greatsword by a local knight who saw the youngster dragging his father's two-handed sword around at the age of 10. By 16 Bjorn was built like an Ox, and was just about as smart. It was at this stage of his life when he set out on his own. After a few years guarding fur traders and fruit stands, Bjorn decided to try the mercenary life. Unfortunately, the mercenary bands he joined were often made up of cut throats and thieves. Good hearted by nature, Bjorn just didn't seem to fit in. Drifting from town to town, he eventually ended up in the small village of Stonebridge. Stonebridge is located on the border between Kent (think Norman/Saxon) and Oan (think Celtic) in a region full of excitement. It was here that Bjorn fell in with a band of adventures out to save the world. That's when his troubles began...

Before joining the group Bjorn didn't respond to threats or grow upset when provoked by bullies; he just sat back and smiled. One morning, after a night of drinking with his mates, Bjorn woke to a throbbing head. As he met the day with a loud yawn a great light filled the room. To his surprise, the light was coming from his mouth! Bjorn's new friends had decided that they liked his smile so much that one of them had placed a "Continual Light" spell on his teeth. Bjorn's name was changed, without his consent or approval, to Beoran Greatsmile, the human lamplight. It was almost a year before Beoran got used to the name... but he NEVER got used to the glowing teeth. Sure, it freed up a hand when fighting in a dark cave, but the jokes were too much to take. The incident changed Bjorn's disposition a little. Anyone who makes more than one comment about the glow is scowled at and sometimes even punched. Mysteriously, no one could be convinced to remove the enchantment.

Even though they picked on him, Beoran's friends did respect, and even love him. This, of course, is why they always let him sample the magic potions they found. Any potion that appeared to aid in the great man's ability to fight was surrendered by the group without complaint. Unfortunately, one of the potions had severe side effects. It appeared to be a potion of invisibility... and it was. Unlike "normal" potions of invisibility, the last potion Beoran EVER drank didn't wear off. The invisibility seemed perpetual, with two exceptions: whenever he smiled the light in his mouth partially pierced the spell. To others Beoran appeared as a glowing skull! Also, when he struck another creature his entire body appeared for several minutes (sometimes hours). While at first this seemed to be a great advantage, Beoran soon discovered that social interaction was extremely difficult. Again, his "friends" decided to change is name, opting for Burt Greatsoap.

Burt was unable to have the "curse" removed for several years, which put a serious cramp in his love life. During this time his friends began to notice other changes in Burt's character. Mood swings became common place. You would sometimes hear him hold long conversations with himself about suicide. The only positive things noticed were that Burt started to sing and read alot; two things most people didn't even know he could do; and it was frightening. Imagine a glowing skull, hovering over a children's book, singing bawdy bar songs. A magical tome the adventurers discovered increased Burt's intelligence, and he moved on to books without pictures.

A Priest was finally found to remove the curse. The glow in his mouth was also removed. Bjorn was thrilled. He decided to tell everyone about it in by singing his life's story. His stage name was Bill Greatsong, but everyone called him Greatgums because, sadly, the continual light spell had consumed most of his teeth. Bill was a flop. He took up his sword and decided to stick to what he knew best. Things were back to normal.

That changed when Bjorn gazed into a magic mirror located inside a wizard's keep. He walked up to it a man with years of experience fighting monsters. He left as a woman with nightmares about running from them. She called herself Bronwyn Greatstack, but a quick communication with a minor deity informed his/her friends that this was indeed Bjorn. It only took the adventurers a month to remove the curse, but it was too late. Bjorn's sanity was now quite gone. One day he's ok, while the next he's convinced he's re-living some part of his life. He may believe himself to be Bill, singing an off-key tune, or Burt, turning himself invisible by waving his arms, or Bronwyn, turning men on with the bat of an eyelash. Some days he even decides to give up fighting and become an elven mage named Bifflin Greatshade. Of course, he isn't elven and can't cast a magic spell; but that doesn't stop him from trying.

Other personalities:
Bo Greatstuff (athlete)
Borax Greatscrub (**** rentitive maid)
Bosco Greatsnack (the over-eater)
Brownbag Greatswill (town drunkard)
Borg Greatspock (trekkie geek)
Bozho Greatshtick (court jester)
Bono Greatshow (self proclaimed messiah)
Bob Greatslack (secret idetity)
...

Wow. That's all I can say.
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That. Is so much awesomeness, I can't say anymore.
I played a melee bard once... His mother was a 1/2 succubus and his father was (supposedly) a demigod that she seduced. As a result, he was extremely lecherous and had no self-control (i think his wisdom score was 6). Also, he was convinced that he was immortal and indestructable... which wasn't "necessarily" the case.

His strength was maxed out and his weapon of choice was improvised weapons... most often his masterwork lute. He would usually try to talk his way out of a fight, (he was as charming as he was strong, of course) but if he's been drinking a lot, he'd just jump in like a barbarian, smashing things with his lute. It wasn't a very powerful build, obviously, but what bard is?

At one point he got possessed by an evil dagger and very nearly killed the rest of the party, murdering one member in their sleep, convincing the guy on watch that someone else had done it and run off "that way", and then engaging another party member in melee while the other two ran off to investigate. If they hadn't come back too soon...
For me it was my friend playing a Half-Elf that was either possesed or had Multiple Personality Disorder (we never figured out which) Anyway he wrote up 6 characters using the same Attribute Numbers, and would roll a D6 at random (at the end of his turn during encounters) to see which he used.

He had a Fighter, Rogue, Wizard, Ranger, Barbarian, Bard, and each had their own personalities and skill selection.

Heh. One of my 4e players was planning something similar...a doppleganger Rogue who'd multiclassed into Paladin and...Warlock, I think it was. He would use the class feats to simulate being a member of the class, and would actually shape shift into different looks. He even made multiple miniatures, one for each identity.
For me it was my friend playing a Half-Elf that was either possesed or had Multiple Personality Disorder (we never figured out which) Anyway he wrote up 6 characters using the same Attribute Numbers, and would roll a D6 at random (at the end of his turn during encounters) to see which he used.

He had a Fighter, Rogue, Wizard, Ranger, Barbarian, Bard, and each had their own personalities and skill selection.

Huh, it seems SP is pretty popular overall for character choices; I once played an elven TWF Fighter/Rogue that had SP, one was CE and one was CG.
It was great fun as my DM at the time had us all starting off as slaves to a gladiator arena with one PC playing the guard captain, one second it's Jameson sitting down one his bed rather absorbed in the thought of how he got there, the next Kraul is sneaking up and strangling the dwarf captain with his chains.

Oft times the DM would just flip a coin and tell me who I was and when I leveled up I'd flip a coin; heads/Jameson = Fighter lvl, tails/Kraul = Rogue lvl
For a 3.5 outdoors game, I played a druid who occasionally practiced cannibalism. He also had ranks in craft (basket weaving) and would make creepy little plant monsters out of plant debris. He would then leave them around the forest, setting them up in scenes for travelers to find. We were traveling during a drought and when the scout set up a dew catcher to collect water, the druid waited till every one was asleep and just "Created Water" in it as a joke, having not informed his companions of his abilities.

He did not have a very good Charisma....
My buddies and I always used to joke about making a "bardbarian" back in the 3.5 days. He would be a multiclass barbarian/bard- hard to guess, I know. Basically he would spend his time splitting skulls and raging in order to perform heavy metal songs better.
One of the more interesting characters I playes was hobgoblin bard/ranger back in 3rd ed. He fancied himself attractive and intellectual though for some reason nobody trusted him. He was also obsessed with learning and mimicking the skills of others. When he found a staff the belonged to an evil cleric he began attempting to heal others with it, going so far as to try to stitch together his fallen companions, substituting body parts as necessary.
I had an elven wizard aiming for initiate of the sevenfold veil. to play into this I decided to give him an obsession with lights and colors. His staff had a prism on it and he was constantly holding it up to different light sources to see how the light would refract and what colors resulted. I had a tendancy to do the same in battles, insisting the DM tell me what light shone through me staff when I threw a fireball without looking where I was aiming, instead waiting for the resulting colors through my staff. I also spoiled a victorious procession through town when the DK made the mistake of mentioning the sunlight glinting off the polished armor of the guards standing along the road, so I stopped to go examine the colors of the guards armor
I once played a Sorcerer in a pretty high level game. The sorcerer was part of an orginization that tried to control & catolgue magic. They obviously disliked cursed items & stored them in big vualts. Prior to being in this game i had picked up a magical greatsword that was being used as an icon of royal power, by a group of women rulers on the back of a zaratan.

The weapon was in fact a very magical greatsword, enchanted with the "charged" magical item variant from an issue of dragon. The item only had one charge left, but it was so very VERY powerful. The downside was that the sword was made by amazons & had the change gender curse on it... Hence the islands population being a matriarchy. I was eventually going to trade it in to my mystical order in exchange for money, but had yet to get around to it.

Everyone was told not to touch the weapon, but i failed to elaborate why. As time went on the GM forgot i had it & during the course of an adventure we where captured & stripped of our toys... including the sword. The next thing we know we have been called to the throne of an orc war-chief & his harem of women & he starts pontificating about our bloody demise. I beg him not to use the sword, but he ignores me & raises it high ready to kill us with our own weapon.

*FLASH*

One girlified Orc-Chief.

That poor Orc. That poor GM. The giggling around the table.

from that day on, all my PC's have carried misc. cursed items.
The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its limits. -Albert Einstein When the forces of stupid collide, magical things happen. And by magical, I mean ******* moronic. - Anon
Amish Malkavian cowboy. With high Humanity (I think I had 7 or 8).

He turned out to be the most "normal" vampire in the party, since the others had pretty low Humanity. This was despite having a permanent derangement (Malkavian clan weakness).
I once played in a game where the DM promised our characters would to go from level 1 to 30 if we would just stick with the game. The DM allowed a ECL up to three, and said we could use any Wizards supplement and any 3pp as long as he approved it before hand. Most other characters took exotic races and classes, but when it came to my turn, the conversation went something like this:

DM: I suppose you'll be playing a Blue Psiblade?

Me: Nope, if you'll let me I'd liketo play a Human Hedge Wizard, from Mongoose games Power Class Series

That's the Cantrip class isn't it? Sure that's fine, but why?

I want to become an epic Spell-Stitched-DracoLich Master of Cantrips.

What? How do you plan to pull that off?

The Hedge Wizards can cast Cantrips at will at level nine, so I'll qualify for the Dragon Disciple Prestige Class. If I max it out I can become a Dracolich at level 20, and then I can get spell stitched.

Why on earth would you do that?

Because the Monster manual says no "Mere Hedge Wizard" can ever hope to meet the prerequisites for becoming a Lich, and I figure a level 20 Dragon Disciple / hedge wizard no longer counts as mere.

So you want to base your character off of proving the monster manual wrong?

Nope, I eventually plan to find a cave of Kobolds some where and live eternally as a god!

Long story short the DM allowed it, but the game disolved some where around level 11, due to schedule differences, so he never came close to his ultimate goal, but he did work hard studdying dragons and the undead. Oh well, The concept lost some of it's appeal when I figured out I'd never be able to become a full dracolich anyways.
When I was a player, I once played in a 3.5e group who had these characters: a prostitute druid, a rogue with an extremely runny nose, a shadowcaster that refused to wear any clothes but shadows, and my character, a loser fighter/wizard. Anyways, the DM of the campaign allowed us each special attributes. The druid was allowed spells from Nymphology, a nasty, non- Wizards supplement. The rogue was allowed a boogie-blasting attack that blinded the victim with snot, made difficult terrain in each square around him, and dealt 1d4 damage per level. The shadowcaster was allowed to conjure shadow clothes out of nowhere for 8 hours. When the clothes faded, awkward situations were created. And lastly, my fighter was given a -5 to diplomacy and Bluf, as he was, as I said, a total loser. In compensation, he got the Rage ability. As you can see, I eventually left the group, and became a DM myself, determined to not let this ever happen again.
I once played a NE Orc warlock with parental issues who, despite being completely ruthless in combat and in his dealings with others had a soft spot for abused children and ended up with a group of battered human, halfling, and elven kids that he'd defend with his life. Anyone who pointed out the contradiction to him in character would be ignored, rebuffed or blasted as the situation warranted. :D
I once had a sorcerer who was constantly naked. He came from a tribe where only warriors proven in battle had the privilege of clothes, since he'd never earnt the right, he never wore clothes, instead using Endure Elements and the like to ensure his survival against the harsh winters of his homeland.

Another was a dark elf psy warrior, as the campaign progresses, we (the entire group was playing drow) left the underdark and attempted to find ways to ensure we'd not return to lolth when we died. The druid married a god, the rogue...is still drow, technically, and my character, with the aid of a gnome tinkerer who was actually an incubus moved his soul from his mortal form and into that of a robot constructed specifically for him. He also pledged himself to Athena, to stop the whole soul returning to lolth thing.

Currently I play an elven bard/arcane archer who's soul is awake and gives him advice from time to time, as well as premonitions and dreams.