Need Help Roleplaying a Cleric

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Hey All,

Lastnight, my friends and I had our first D&D 4.0 session. We had a pretty good time. My guy is a devoted human cleric. He was a big asset on the battlefield, and I think everyone was glad he was there for his heals. But once the battles were over, I started to have trouble with the role-play aspects of his personality.

Going into the session, I had brought several prayers and parables that I inteded him to say in oppertune moments. If an NPC approached us and wanted to know who we were (We are all followers of the Raven Queen) I'd have a short parable ready to explain us and our faith. This all sounded like a good idea in my head. But when it got to the actual game, he became less of a missionary prophet and more of a door to door Jehovah's Witness.

It seemed as though there were few times that me speaking my prayers and parables would benefit our group in any way. It would just be a distraction to the things we were really trying to figure out.

So I guess what I'd like is to just get some ideas from others on how I might be able to inject some new role play techniques into my character that could be more fun. It was fun to type up Raven Queen prayers, but it's kind fo sucky if no one cares to hear them, hehe.

Here is the back story for my character...

Caleb had once been a righteous cleric of Pelor. In the land where he was raised, he was taught that the sun was the keeper of life. He worked tirelessly as a healer, bringing comfort to those who suffered. So it was till the black flags of war usurped his homeland. Legions of Foulspawn laid siege to his people. Caleb was forced to bare witness, as his friends and family, mentors and students, the strong and the weak; all suffered a horrific end. Caleb's heart was shattered. He raised his arms to the heavens, pleading that Pelor put an end to the bloodshed of his faithful brethren. But his prayers were met with cold silence. The warm glow of Caleb's mighty sun god had been blotted out by the callous hand death.
Caleb, along with those who were left alive, were taken back to dank ancient caverns below the earth. There, they worked as slaves to the foulspawn and their black master mindflayers. Those who would resist were quickly and brutally dispatched. For 5 years, Caleb endured a life of horror and misery. It was not until a quarrel broke out between the foulspawn and minflayer hordes, that Caleb along with several others seized the opportunity to make their escape. Many were killed in the initial breakout. The rest became lost and disoriented by the winding caverns of the deep. Only Caleb managed to reach the surface alive.
How he had been spared, Caleb could not say. So many innocent were left dead; he wondered if this was a cruel joke, that the gods left him to endure. Caleb appealed to Pelor, whose bright gaze he could finally bask in after years of captivity. Yet even now, the sun's light felt hollow and abject. Pelor had abandoned Caleb and his people.
Caleb cast off his faith. He turned from the light of Pelor and spat on the gods. Wandering the land aimlessly, Caleb felt his spirit slip away. He no longer had the will to care for others. With nothing left to live for, Caleb seeked to end his life.
It was then, that he first felt the guiding path.
In a dream, Caleb was beset by wings of ebony. A voice pierced the darkness, bringing him comfort. The grief and turmoil in his heart was lifted. He understood now. Life and death were but two sides of the same coin. The death of his people was not to be mourned; it was to be understood. Their fate had written their end. Nothing, from the warrior that wields the sword to the guise of Pelor's warmth, would change the hands of fate. Caleb saw now why he had not perished that day. His fate had not yet been fulfilled.
Caleb embraced the being that now gave him purpose and understanding. He returned to his home to sanctify the remains of those who had died years ago. His blessings, powered by a renewed faith. Caleb knew now that his life must continue. He would now serve to spread the will of his holy mother. He would cast down those who would challenge the sands of fate. To challenge his eternal goddess. To challenge, The Raven Queen.
How about reciting your parables to a captive audience(ie the monsters your group is slaughtering)? Kind of like Jules in Pulp Fiction. Make sure you make them amusing, so you aren't frustrating your group, and make sure you aren't taking up too much time with them. I would say maybe one line per round of combat, and I'd probably save them for the big bads.

I haven't done something like this before, but it sounds fun. I'd suggest not getting attached to the idea though. Try it once first, to make sure you are going to have fun with it, and that it isn't going to annoy the rest of your group. If it's a hit, keep going with it. Otherwise, find another way to use the stuff.
Hey All,

Lastnight, my friends and I had our first D&D 4.0 session. We had a pretty good time. My guy is a devoted human cleric. He was a big asset on the battlefield, and I think everyone was glad he was there for his heals. But once the battles were over, I started to have trouble with the role-play aspects of his personality.

Going into the session, I had brought several prayers and parables that I inteded him to say in oppertune moments. If an NPC approached us and wanted to know who we were (We are all followers of the Raven Queen) I'd have a short parable ready to explain us and our faith. This all sounded like a good idea in my head. But when it got to the actual game, he became less of a missionary prophet and more of a door to door Jehovah's Witness.

It seemed as though there were few times that me speaking my prayers and parables would benefit our group in any way. It would just be a distraction to the things we were really trying to figure out.

Doing things when is appropriate = Role-Play


Doing things when could benefit your group = Power Play

You don't have to cripple your group to be a good roleplayer but you have to ask yourself what would your character do, not what is more advantageous for the group. Sometimes your behavior is advantageous, sometimes is not, sometimes could even be harmful.


anyway ....

try to have a prupose for every prayer.
You could have a short prayer to say when the party is preparing for battle.
another one after the fight for the enemies you kill in battle.
you should try to suppress the urge to tell a parable to all the people you meet... that really sounds like a Jehovah's Witness. Instead store them for when someone is really interested in hearing that sort of thing or when someone is questioning your faith.
Remember that even if you are a cleric you are a person, not a walking PrayerBot.
Sometimes your cleric is concerned with Eartly matters and does not need to put his deity everywhere.
Your deity is a big part in your Life, not YOUR LIFE