human fighter and human wizard

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With both humans and fighters getting more interesting mechanic to represent their descriptions I thought it might be a fun combo to play.

Regeth, Human Fighter. Being raised as a poor farmer's son in the city of Gonoloch, Regeth's background was fairly ordinary. He did visit the city a lot to read in the library and see the grand buildings. What he also saw in the city's streets was humans robbing other humans in dark alleys, merchants squabbling with patrons. There were a fair number of dwarves and elves in the town. Regeth noticed there were a few different types of reactions to these non-humans, either suspicion, acceptance or overt friendliness. The elves would typically ride in on white stallions and stride through town covered in lush outfits. Regeth had no respect for the hateful attitude a few humans had towards them, but also had a nagging problem with the arrogant attitude the elves displayed towards those who were accepting. The dwarves could be more down to earth, but believed in dwarven superiority when it came to architecture/engineering. He believed the simple people of his town believed they were less special or more mediocre than other races. Regeth was bothere by this, because he respected many things he saw aroudn him in the town. The hard work and determination put into the bustling city, the bravery of the battered town guard who protected the town from the many dark threats. An intelligent and philosophical man, Regeth began to chafe in his current lifestyle as a farmer. He was inspired by tales in dusty books of human heroes from ages past who defeated great evils in the land. But that's all they were, dusty old books. During this crisis of self, Regeth's father died.

Regeth was grieved greatly, as his father was a kind man where other farmers could be abusive to their family. Regeth, who had already done some basic training with the militia, trained in the arts of war as much as he could. He sought training practice with local militia, practiced himself, and read books on martial art. He was particularly interested in the maneouvers and technique he could perform with his weapons, and he gained even more respect for the courage required to face foes head on. His mother was left with a decent sum from his father, and she turned the farm into a much more profitable one. Financially secure, and with many friends and relative to care for her, Regeth decided he would take his savings and go travel. His mother was hesitant but agreed. He wishes to experience more of the world, he does not want his life to spent in mundane ways. He is determined to continually improve his fighting skills so he can perhaps change the world in a better way, and make a living for himself in this exciting lifestyle. He is a little bitter that humans have to deal with the perception of being weak and mundane in a world filled with danger, and he is determined never to bow down or back down from challenges. He is a compassionate person despite this drive, and the young man is often seen reading books of lore while resting, and is delighted to learn more about other races cultures.


edit: ill add my human wizard later on
A fairly normal background, however, I think you're missing one important part of character history: What makes him "special"? Why is it -this- guy who is going to save the world?

Without that in mind, you've just got another character in a game. Give him the spark of potential, something your GM will lovingly incorporate into his campaign, and you'll have a Human Fighter (as well as campaign) to remember for as long as you live.
A fairly normal background, however, I think you're missing one important part of character history: What makes him "special"?

His drive? I'd agree that perhaps the character could use more of a hook, though.

Anyway, the only thing that jumped out at me as inconsistent was how Regeth's family is mentioned as being "poor", yet when his father dies he leaves the mother a "decent sum of money".
Very quaint(sp?). I like the idea of him having sort of a mission, but not one that consumes his whole ideals. He is just a compassionate book friendly fighter. I agree that he doesn't have a real "hook" to him, but I enjoy mundane heroes as much as any other. One recommendation: give him at least a 12 intelligence to represent his scholarly side.
He's level one and most of the weird things in his life haven't happened yet. I supposed I could have made something unusual happen to him, but not all adventurers start off with strong experiences.
I agree. I think he will be a great addition to any party as is.
I really like your fighter. What I like the most is that he doesn't have some kind of destiny or tragic past, the world is full of those heroes, we need some more ordinary ones.
He's level one and most of the weird things in his life haven't happened yet. I supposed I could have made something unusual happen to him, but not all adventurers start off with strong experiences.

Very true.
I really like your fighter. What I like the most is that he doesn't have some kind of destiny or tragic past, the world is full of those heroes, we need some more ordinary ones.

I don't directly disagree, but I don't think that average everyday Joe heroes jive very well with the 1st level adventurer in 4th edition. The 1st level characters in 4th edition seem more like the types that have already done some kind of adventuring, and aren't just setting out from home with a sword they haven't ever used on anyone before.

Characters that have already done something heroic in their lives prior to the campaign may turn out better results in 4th edition.
D&D rules were never meant to exist without the presence of a DM. RAW is a lie.
I don't directly disagree, but I don't think that average everyday Joe heroes jive very well with the 1st level adventurer in 4th edition. The 1st level characters in 4th edition seem more like the types that have already done some kind of adventuring, and aren't just setting out from home with a sword they haven't ever used on anyone before.

Characters that have already done something heroic in their lives prior to the campaign may turn out better results in 4th edition.

Maybe, but I tend to think characters with a more 'mild' background tend to be the most memorable. Given, I agree that from what I have seen of 4E starting characters, they do seem to be the more experienced sort. Perhaps this guy just has great natural potential to rival the 'experience' of other 1st level party members?
Prior experience could still be fairly mundane, such as "exceptional member of the town militia".
I don't directly disagree, but I don't think that average everyday Joe heroes jive very well with the 1st level adventurer in 4th edition. The 1st level characters in 4th edition seem more like the types that have already done some kind of adventuring, and aren't just setting out from home with a sword they haven't ever used on anyone before.

Characters that have already done something heroic in their lives prior to the campaign may turn out better results in 4th edition.

One of the reasons I don't like 4th edition.
To say that the "World of full of those heroes" doesn't really jive with me. That's the reason FR turned me off: there's so many exceptional people out there already.

When I DM, the world is about -them-. The WORLD, needs -them-. They aren't someone out to make a quick buck by killing some goblins. They are people out to change the world. They don't need a tragic past, a secret bloodline, or anything like that to accomplish this goal, but they need something to set them apart from anyone else picking up a sword. It can be as simple as an amulet of unknown origins.

Granted, some people like more "down to earth" type settings and characters, or may even prefer the ordinary man in extraordinary circumstances. But players drive the game forward and when they have backgrounds to facilitate the DM throwing them into crisis, the campaign is only bettered. No great game or story centers around joe schmo. His background really leaves little to a DM to set up great campaign adventures to really develop his character.
Actually, in any good story, you only need one really exceptional person, the rest of the group, not the red shirt expendables but the other key players, work around, thru and off that one constant, once the story rolls on, each one of those everday joes get their own place in the sun. i like the origin with a couple private tweaks of my own, good write up tho
When I DM, the world is about -them-. The WORLD, needs -them-. They aren't someone out to make a quick buck by killing some goblins. They are people out to change the world. They don't need a tragic past, a secret bloodline, or anything like that to accomplish this goal, but they need something to set them apart from anyone else picking up a sword. It can be as simple as an amulet of unknown origins.

That's a fine hook and all, but I don't see how an amulet is much different than the aforementioned "twagic" past or secret bloodline. An amulet is ultimately just a thing that the person would have--a McGuffin--it doesn't make the holder a "special person" just because they have it.

The OP mentioned the player's father died, but gave no details about it. Maybe the father died because of foul play? And if so, why? And if the family was poor, how did the father leave the mother a substantial amount of money? Upon further thought I see some good hooks hidden in the text, no amulet required (though it certainly could come into play if that was desired).
Actually, in any good story, you only need one really exceptional person, the rest of the group, not the red shirt expendables but the other key players, work around, thru and off that one constant, once the story rolls on, each one of those everday joes get their own place in the sun. i like the origin with a couple private tweaks of my own, good write up tho

Very true, but in a game with multiple players, you don't want just one PC to be the center of attention with the others as side characters (unless they're OK with that).
That's a fine hook and all, but I don't see how an amulet is much different than the aforementioned "twagic" past or secret bloodline. An amulet is ultimately just a thing that the person would have--a McGuffin--it doesn't make the holder a "special person" just because they have it.

That all view dependent. Was Frodo an "ordinary person" just because he had the One ring? Or was being the one person to carry the thing that made him a special character? This concept of destiny is very pervasive in 4th.

The OP mentioned the player's father died, but gave no details about it. Maybe the father died because of foul play? And if so, why? And if the family was poor, how did the father leave the mother a substantial amount of money? Upon further thought I see some good hooks hidden in the text, no amulet required (though it certainly could come into play if that was desired).

They aren't really "hidden" in the text. A smaller background leaves plenty of room for the DM to work with, which as you've pointed out, is rather evident. However, my belief is that if any normal militia man could set out for adventure and save the world, we'd end up with a hundred Drizzt's and Elminster's. Now, some DMs love this as it allows them to focus more on their own story, but I'm a Player focused DM. Since my group's held together for the past 10 years or so though, I know what twists to take to keep them interested, but if I did the same stuff with people I don't know so well, they might not like it.

Average Joe has one saving grace though, being the normal guy within a party of wildly uniques. While the rest of his team can retain that flavored and unique background, he stands unique if he is the only one actually with a mundane background. I feel that sometimes being normal among freaks makes you one yourself. When you see a scaly paladin, a pointy eared wizard, and a fiendish looking warlock, that human guy who swings his sword seems to fit... for some reason.
Just thought I'd like to add:

One of my favorite characters was a simple hunter. Spent his life tracking, killing, and eating wildlife. He'd return from the hunt and trade the furs for simple tools he'd use out in his little cabin.

He probably didn't have much in terms of "special", outside of his awesome character sheet build, but he -became- special. He had dreams and goals far beyond anyone else. Which I see a similar spark of in this character. While I firmly believe that players need to give their character a spark of heroics, it may all boil down to the DM on whether or not your background is of any use or not, and whether or not he becomes a memorable favorite.

And if all in all, you just want a character you can relate to and almost play yourself as someone in their shoes, then go ahead. It's what you want and what you'll have the most fun doing.
In regards to 1st level 4e pcs being experienced already, we should remember level 1 monsters are a lot more powerful as well. I don't think of 4e pcs as being more experiences than their lvl 1 brethren in 2e/3e, the edition has just reduced the gap between lvl1's and lvl 5's.
That all view dependent.

It is. We might have different views about this, and that's OK. However, I do stand by everything I wrote previously.
His drive? I'd agree that perhaps the character could use more of a hook, though.

Anyway, the only thing that jumped out at me as inconsistent was how Regeth's family is mentioned as being "poor", yet when his father dies he leaves the mother a "decent sum of money".

That jumps out to me as a hook, his father was an adventurer before he married. There is the potential within him.
That jumps out to me as a hook, his father was an adventurer before he married. There is the potential within him.

Well yes, I did mention that in a subsequent post.
I might add that his father died of an illness, and perhaps he approached an elven visitor for a herb that might have cured him, but was met with a reply that elven herbs were not allowed to be traded to humans. He does not know whether the herb could have cured his father or not, but the memory remains. His father saved up some money over the years which was a good sum, which he left to his wife. This enabled her to live a financially secure life. Regeth and his mother did not know about the extent of the savings, as they lived a poor life. The money was there to make sure the family would be provided for no matter what.

His positive qualities: Intelligent, learning attitude and interest in lore, compassionate, brave, dedicated to improving fighting skill, tolerant, indomitable attitude, takes an interest in life.

negative qualities: Bitter over the seemingly mundane or inferior life humans have to lead, takes it personally when a problem crops up that he cannot solve, hard to stay in one place too long because of his wanderlust, does not know when to back down or accept things, idealistic about the potential of humans to achieve great deeds, can be too harsh on himself and other humans for failings, although tolerant can sometimes be bitter towards demihumans in weaker moments.