Was the Golden State Killer a D&D Player?

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Hi All,
I've come to your message board following the trail of a killer. I am web slueth working on the Golden State Killer case. The clues have lead me to believe that this killer was somehow connected to the D&D community in the late 1970's in the sacramento area. GSK is still at large in California.  In 1978 after an attempted attack on a couple, police found some notebook pages and booked them into evidence. They were found just this past year and have been released by the police through a recent article in LA Magazine.  A map was among these note book pages. I have no proof, but I have some reason to suspect that this map is a D&D map. I'm a guest at this forum to ask for your expert opinion's regarding this map. If you have any reason to beleve that something on this map looks like it is from D&D please let me know.  I also want to hear if there is no way this is a D&D map. 

Let me know if I should post this at a different location.

Here is the front:
IMAGE(http://i1328.photobucket.com/albums/w538/gskonstracker/0313suspect2_zps74cf443b.jpg)

Here is the back:
IMAGE(http://i1328.photobucket.com/albums/w538/gskonstracker/enhancedbackofmap_zps45736321.jpg)
Not sure if this is the right place for this, but let me say this.

Doesn't look like any kind of D&D map I'd ever use or have ever seen.  Almost every D&D map would have multiple important locations numbered or lettered on the map to go along with a key document describing game encounters in detail.  Plus, this just doesn't look like a fantasy location to me; it looks more like a depiction of some real-life location with residential areas and some sort of commercial or public building nearby.  IOW, a map, real or fictional, of a modern, non-fantasy location.

If you want to look at what real D&D maps from that period looked like, there used to be a page on WoTC's website that had links to "freeware" PDFs of old D&D adventures, but I don't know if those are available anymore.  Someone else might be able to direct you to those.  Regardless, anyone could clearly see the difference between the fantasy locations of D&D and something more true-to-life like this map. 

Maybe he was part of the D&D community because D&D is a game that attracts all kinds of people from all walks of life, but I don't think this map is any indication of that one way or the other.  I think you're reaching ... far.

OD&D, 1E and 2E challenged the player. 3E challenged the character, not the player. Now 4E takes it a step further by challenging a GROUP OF PLAYERS to work together as a TEAM. That's why I love 4E.

"Your ability to summon a horde of celestial superbeings at will is making my ... BMX skills look a bit redundant."

"People treat their lack of imagination as if it's the measure of what's silly. Which is silly." - Noon

"Challenge" is overrated.  "Immersion" is usually just a more pretentious way of saying "having fun playing D&D."

"Falling down is how you grow.  Staying down is how you die.  It's not what happens to you, it's what you do after it happens.”

Looks like a map of a university or maybe a housing development.

I can't make it out, but the lake seems to be labeled.  Perhaps someone familiar with the region recognizes the name of the lake? 
Yeah, that looks like a modern (possibly real) location. The road layout is unmistakably modern. The main road at the top left has a central reservation (I think you Americans call it a 'median'?). A few minutes on Google Earth tells me those 'roundabout at the end of a culdesac' things are common in the Sacramento suburbs. I'm not an American, so I don't know if they're common in the US generally. To my British eyes, they seem pretty distinctive. The top left looks like a small university campus or a country club or something.

If I were you, I'd get in touch with Google and see if they can match the map to a real location in that area.

The lake with all the footpaths around it is very distinctive. Buildings may have changed a lot in 30-40 years, but if that's a real place, I would expect the lake to look the same on a modern map.

"My flying carpet is full of elves."

It looks like a residential area surrounding a lake to me, quite mundane, uniform housing, typical stuff you see around Country Clubs out here.
Not sure if this is the right place for this, but let me say this.

Doesn't look like any kind of D&D map I'd ever use or have ever seen.  Almost every D&D map would have multiple important locations numbered or lettered on the map to go along with a key document describing game encounters in detail.  Plus, this just doesn't look like a fantasy location to me; it looks more like a depiction of some real-life location with residential areas and some sort of commercial or public building nearby.  IOW, a map, real or fictional, of a modern, non-fantasy location.

If you want to look at what real D&D maps from that period looked like, there used to be a page on WoTC's website that had links to "freeware" PDFs of old D&D adventures, but I don't know if those are available anymore.  Someone else might be able to direct you to those.  Regardless, anyone could clearly see the difference between the fantasy locations of D&D and something more true-to-life like this map. 

Maybe he was part of the D&D community because D&D is a game that attracts all kinds of people from all walks of life, but I don't think this map is any indication of that one way or the other.  I think you're reaching ... far.

Thank you for your responses. I agree that it looks more like a real place than a fantasy place. I know that I am reaching, but that's the only way I'll find out.

There is very little evidence that GSK was involved specifically in D&D. However, he was known to steal RC controllers and there is a suspect sticker that seems to suggest that he was involved in model rocketry. It is a mystery.

Re: this map, many people have tried to find this neighborhood depicted. I spent 6 months looking at google earth myself. It is in California somewhere, but where? The lead investigator seemed to think it was a fantasy map, thus D&D. What other fantasy or 'war games" were played in the late 1970's that had maps?

Has anyone ever played D&D with a real map in a real neighborhood? Forgive my ignorance, but I don't know enough about the game to know if that's a stupid question. 

 
Thank you for your responses. I agree that it looks more like a real place than a fantasy place. I know that I am reaching, but that's the only way I'll find out.

There is very little evidence that GSK was involved specifically in D&D. However, he was known to steal RC controllers and there is a suspect sticker that seems to suggest that he was involved in model rocketry. It is a mystery.



I don't know whether you're serious or not, but I'm just going to warn you right now that there was a lot of hysteria a while back about how D&D is a gateway to a weird satanic cult that causes kids to commit suicide or perform ritual murders in the middle of the night, and all of that is complete bullshit.  It's a hobby no more and no less sinister than building model airplanes or collecting stamps, and a lot of people who play D&D will have a very strong negative reaction to anything that sounds like trying to associate their hobby with things like murder - in part because the hobby still bears some of the scars from when those completely unfounded rumours were all the rage.

Also, D&D has nothing to do with RC controllers or model rockets.

Re: this map, many people have tried to find this neighborhood depicted. I spent 6 months looking at google earth myself. It is in California somewhere, but where? The lead investigator seemed to think it was a fantasy map, thus D&D. What other fantasy or 'war games" were played in the late 1970's that had maps?

Has anyone ever played D&D with a real map in a real neighborhood? Forgive my ignorance, but I don't know enough about the game to know if that's a stupid question.



It's possible that people play D&D using maps that are based off of real locations (for example, I'm planning an encounter where the bad guy's lair is loosely based off of Allan Gardens in Toronto, or someone can use the floor plan for their favourite bar to create a map for a scene in a tavern), but generally people don't, if only just because it's cooler to have an adventure in some magical alternate universe than some boring suburb.  And this map in particular does not look like a map that someone would use for D&D at all.

Why do you suspect that this is a D&D map?  It looks to me like a suburb, with a school or something like that in the top left, possibly under construction (as it doesn't show houses or lot lines on the cul-de-sacs below and to the right of the lake, so maybe the roads were put in but the houses haven't been constructed yet there).
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Hi,

I'm going to lock this thread. I'm afraid discussions like this really have no place in our forums.

Thank you for understanding our position,

Monica
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