What is your RPG culture ?

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Many people are arguing about many things about D&D, but a very few seems to take into account our culture differences, even regarding RPG.
In another thread, the discussion derived on the subject, and I think it would interesting to collect general informations about roleplaying experiences from different part of the world, and the place D&D have in them.

From what I understand, D&D wasn't the first RPG even in the USA, it was just the first with devs having the will and the means to publish TTRPGs rules. Wargamers were already actively playing RPGs and tinkering with the concept before D&D, and even after, D&D wasn't a clear concept, most players using frankenstein versions using elements from different RPGs, sometimes without even knowing it.



Here is my experience starting in the 80s:

In France, I played homemade RPGs and Strombringer before using the AD&D 1st ed books we had.
Our interest about D&D was that each edition was bringing some innovations.
My experience with D&D 1st and 2nd was full of houserules, hundreds of alternatives to vancian spellcasting, and thousands of homemade classes and races, (including medium golems and playable dopplegangers).
2nd edition lasted too long, deprived of characters options (opposed to class options), ending with the player's options suicide, so we then played White Wolf and homemade fantasy games until 3rd edition.

We started RPGs at 13-15 years old. Most players weren't fluent enough (or not at all) in english to understand even 75% of the rules (no internet to help), and imperial measures didn't help, so we had to wait translated editions for the books used by players. So we never bought a single adventure supplement at this time, and then never developed the need or interest in buying any adventure thereafter.

In France at this time (80's), there wasn't : internet, easy access to foreign languages dictionaries (none of them included familiar or cultural expressions), easy access to non mainstream foreign cultural goods.
Translation and publication were taking longer, and the concept of RPG was totally absent from medias. People were either discovering the RPG concept in the rare game stores, or even more rare specialized game stores, or were discovering RPG from a friend. (For me, it was a friend)

The first time RPG was brought to the attention of the public was through a mad player backstabbing a teacher. So RPG directly upgraded to an unknown concept to a dangerous sect.

So RPG is very transgressive in my mind, not something to be conservative about. So it seems there's already a big cultural difference with american players here. 
French RPGs players around me were not discarded as being weak and disconnected, but more like more educated than average intriguing animals, potentially dangerous. The current roleplayer profile around me in 80s and 90s was a male listening alternative musics (mostly hard-rock/metal), interested in fantasy and science fiction media, reading BD and comics, often a drunkard, and often aggressively proud to be different.

A RPG wasn't a family game for most players I known until recently, with the the first players becoming parents and the geeks rising in power around the world with internet.

Now, you know how someone can be completly surprised when reading aggressive posts about defending concepts like tradition or comfort zones. These concept are totally against how I lived RPG in my little corner of the world in my youth. For me RPG is a fight in constant need of adaptation, progressive and never conservative in any way. In my head, "RPG" is one of the synonyms of "new".

I hope this gave you a better idea of my personal gaming culture.

Now, I want to read about yours !

If you think my english is bad, just wait until you see my spanish and my italian. Defiling languages is an art.

pre4E DnD, gamma world with 4E rules, mutants and masterminds, Deadlands (any system), Marvel FASERIP, played some WOD but not my thing but loved the setting books and intrigue.  Loved Thyatian and Alphatian Empires in Mystara.  Loved Gord the Rogue series for greyhawk.  Diehard Ravenloft and Planescape roleplayer.   Loved Birthright wish it had more support in 3.x.   Eberon was a breath of fresh air in 3.5 and I really really love the setting.  We dabble a little with Runequest and find it an interesting setting.  Also loved Conan d20.  We play alot in settings similar to 1000 BC Earth politically and culturally (not technologically).  Still use the Companion rules for mass combat and kingdom building, but am switching to the rules in Ultimate Campaign derived from the Kingmaker adventure path.  Love lots of guilds and factions competing with each other and forming strange alliances.  Dragons and the Seelie Courts are the most powerful beings in the universe feared by Demons and Angels.  Gods are just powerful beings worshipped by people.  There are many types of gods with many different goals and power sources.  I am growing very fond of Savage Worlds.  And every now and then we get an urge to play Metamorphosis Alpha.  True20 is interesting as is Dragon Age, but never played it alot.  I have a love/hate relationship with miniatures and am moving away from them.


I enjoy Fritz Leiber, Michael Moorecock, Jack Vance, Gary Gygax, Lovecraft, Robert E Howard, Robin Hobb, Jim Butcher, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Lord Dunsany, Anne Rice, Edgar Allen Poe, Roger Zelazney, Robert Heinlein, Stan Lee, Peter David, Grant Morrison, Alan Moore, Roy Thomas, John Milton, Dante Alighieri, Sophocles, Virgil, Ovid, Orpheus, Homer, Hesiod, and many more authors.


Loved the new Star Wars movies, loved the new Star Trek movies.  Looking forward to a Justice League movie.  300 was great.
I can only tell what the progression was like in the part of the netherlands where I live.

DnD was basicly not availible in shops pre ADnD 2nd, you could have some comic stores import it from the US or UK if you realy wanted it but it was pretty expensive to do so.

First game that got a biger folowing was Warhammer tabletop fantasy battles that was sold trough moddel shops.
And the game heroquest en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HeroQuest. witch was released in the same year as ADnd 2nd.
At this time more comic stores started to have AdnD 2nd on the shelves.

After 1993 ( maybe like 1994 or 1995 )magic the gathering became a big hype and we saw the opening of the first game shops.
Besides Magic the gathering they did sell AdnD 2nd, but as far as i know retailers at that point coulden't order directly from TSR.
meaning there where middel man the order time was long and it was still expensive.

The main Boom for DnD came with the release of 3rd edition that used the much more efficient WOTC/Hasbro distribution system that was already in place.


so players of early editions are rare, personaly i never met a person who played version of DnD before ADnD 2nd exept when traveling abroad.
There is a small group like me that started with ADnD 2nd, but i think in my area 75% who play DnD started with 3rd.
My experience started at the end of the 80's. I bought Dragons of Winter (italian translation) and on the last page there was the advertisement of D&D. At that time a big italian gaming company (the same publishing the italian version of Risk and Scrabble) came out with the italian trasnlation of the Mentzer set, so you could finf the red box in most gaming stores and I got mine for Christmas (red box, not the gaming store).

We played 1e for some time but then moved to AD&D2e and played that for over ten years. I actually enjoyed the Player's Options books (we allowed any material at our table as long as we had a copy of it, including weird stuff from Dragon).
It was a great time but then we basically stopped playing as most of us moved to the university in different places. 

It was at the university in Milano that I started playing 3e with a group of other students, which is basically the same group I'm playing with now (some of them are my best friends, one is my witness at the wedding and another is the godfather of my daughter). We moved to 4e as soon as it came out and still play it both in the D&D and the Ultramodern4 version. Honestly we didn't like 3e too much, mostly because it took a lot of prep time between sessions and we didn't really have it.

Over time I played some other systems: LotR, Kult, World of Darkness (mostly Vampire and a little Changeling), Alternity and Call of Ctulhu, but D&D always stayed number one.

D&D was a much bigger game in the 80s-90s here too. Now most FLGSs are closed and most of the gaming associations I knew are closed as well. Some stores still sell D&D or other TTRPGs but usually their main business is comics or computer games. There is not really much awareness of the game around especially in the young generation, but there is for sure great potential. If a good D&D movie would come to the cinema I think we could see a big resurgence.

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/23.jpg)

My experience started around 1983.   I was invited to a game using the red box set and I played a fighter named Taran.  I got the name from the Prydain Chronicles by Lloyd Alexander.

Soon, I discovered AD&D 1e when I talked to a friend at school about my campaign.  I was intrigued and he sold me his used books.  I still have those books to this day.  He wrote a custom spell he'd created inside the back cover.  He was constantly having money problems and selling all his books and then turning around and buying more later.  I got many adventures and books from him over the years.

I started up campaign probably late 1983.  I was in a special county wide program and met a lot of other creative people there.  I became the DM and I've been DMing ever since.  We played 1e all the way until 2e was released and then we switched.   I went off to college in 1986 and our play time slowed some as we could only meet occasionally on weekends.   
 
During my high school years, D&D was ubiquitous.  Everyone heard of it.  I played in the breakfast cafeteria before school in a campaign.  It was serious by my standards but I played along.   There was a "hobby" shop that mostly dealt with crafts etc... but the guy had one shelf of D&D stuff.  I got most of what I have from that shop early on.

There was a lull towards the end of 2e, but by the time 3e came around I was out of college and working.   Many of my high school friends and some new people also played it quite a bit.   When 4e was announced, I embraced it and recruited a group and played it well over a year.   The campaign ended though from lack of interest due to our not liking the rules.

There are game shops about nowadays.  They come and go often.  Cards are big.  Miniatures games are popular too.  

 

My Blog which includes my Hobby Award Winning articles.

I was born, raised, (and still am) in Southern California - just 10 minutes from Disneyland.

I got started young in D&D at the neighbor's house. I wanted to be a ninja (TMNT being big at the time). 1 guy treated me like a munchkin but the other guys were very cool about having a 2nd grader wreak havoc on their game. I think I threw a chair at an Orc, after hearing how it was described.

Anyway, that hooked me. I took up 2nd Ed. Then 3rd. Then 4E.

My favorite 3rd style games were Ravenloft, d20 modern & d20 future. Also did some SWSE. For 4E I do a home brew.

As I'm a bit of a homebody, I don't go to conventions and rarely participate in FLGS events.

Currently running DW, Heroquest, & 4E with a pool of 8-12 people.

My group uses maps, minis, & 3d paper models. We do some good RP, some acting (varies by player), and we enjoy a good skirmish.

There are 4 other similar sized groups I know of within 10 miles. PF & 4E are the big games going. Some nWoD.
Can we make this a sticky so people no longer start complaint threads with the entire history of their gaming career?

Anyway, short version:

Started out playing the gold box games. Played actual tabletop in '95 (HUMAN FIGHTER WITH TWO-HANDER AND ONLY TWO GOOD SCORES REPRESENT!). Been hooked on rpgs ever since. Other than D&D, I've played Alternity, Lord of the rings (don't care what anyone says, it's a great game), Conan, M&M, Savage Worlds, DCC - the list goes on and on, but I'm stopping here. Brevity is a virtue.

Also, I'm working on my own, and it's coming together nicely, if slowly.
Color me flattered.

LIFE CYCLE OF A RULES THREAD

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Thank_Dog wrote:

2Chlorobutanal wrote:
I think that if you have to argue to convince others about the clarity of something, it's probably not as objectively clear as you think.

No, what it means is that some people just like to be obtuse.


In the very early 90s, I moved back from France and found my cousin and his friends starting to get very hooked up in RPGs. Since I had been gone for a while at the terre du vin et fromage, when I came back I kinda had lost contact with old friends. I started hanging out a lot with my cousin and his friends, who were about the same age (11~13) and were playing a lot of D&D (the red dragon box), AD&D 2e, and TSR's Marvel Super Heroes (FASERIP system).

Never played much 1e AD&D, since 2e was already out, but we did run games of Old D&D along with AD&D 2e at the time. Our experience at the time was very much like the OP's, in the sense that many of us weren't very fluent in English, but we did have some people who spoke the language a better (including me) and we tried to get our hands in whatever D&D book the local stores would import, and we who spoke English a bit better made an effort to explain the game for those who didn't. We avoided translated books (when they came out a few years later) as much as possible because the translations in them were very bad and sometimes rules would read differently in the badly-translated books.

Not to mention the cheesy names... "Continual Light" was translated to something that would re-translate back to English like: "Brightness of the Perpetual Dawn"... that's just... I... well, let's not get into that.

Not to mention that very few stuff besides the Core Books were ever translated at the time.

Funny thing is that sometimes we ended up with weird book-setups because we only had access to whatever the stores could get their hands on. For example, I had the "Spaceships" suplement for Spelljammer years before I even got the Basic Boxet Set. Also, the first thing I ever got from Dark Sun was an Adventure: Freedom. Only a while later did I find the Basic books.

But we made do with whatever we had, filling in the blanks of the missing books with our own things: house-rules, house-settings and house-stories. While we bought whatever we could find at the stores (and our wallets could handle).

D&D for me has always been about sitting around a table and telling stories. Each player has a story of his character he wants to tell, and the DM has a bigger story about the world and everything else to tell.

Rules for me were--have always been--and still are--a system to support storytelling and interpretation. For when you need to know what you're character is good at and what are his chances to succeed in some task. I like rules. I love to read them, toy with them, make new ones, and I sometimes read whole different RPG systems that I'll never play just for the fun of reading new ideas for rules.

But that's why--as far as rules go--I care a lot more about having broad simple and easy-to-shape rules than thousands of tiny specific rules, abilities, etc. No ammount of written "options" will ever beat the ammount of possibilities your mind can come up with. My experience with RPGs taught me that simplified, broad-encompassing rules tend to allow more freedom of creation, variety, and interesting concepts.

Making your own "thing", your own stories, your own ideas for characters... even if making it inside pre-made settings like Dark Sun, Forgotten Realms, etc, has always been the biggest appeal of RPGs to me. Playing D&D is like writing a story with the help of your friends.

That's how we played it in the begining, that's how I still play it.



I can't believe I forgot to talk about the funny translations like Rastapopoulos did !
Sometimes, the rules are changing just because the translators treat rulebooks like novels and "correct" the syntax.
I believe there are as many editions of D&D as there are translated versions, lol. 

If you think my english is bad, just wait until you see my spanish and my italian. Defiling languages is an art.

Personal opinion...

Very good thread.  Let's keep it positive and about our personal experiences.  :D

Growing up in New England in the 80s, D&D was still the obscure nerd game that had a heavy social stigma to it.  I got into it via fantasy novels and choose-your-own-adventure books and my older step-brother.  There were only a handful of people I knew who played it.

In the 90s, I joined the United States Air Force where D&D and RPGs in general were huge.  It was never hard to find players for any game you cared to play.  The same was true for the Navy in the 2000s.  Gaming and the military were like chocolate and peanutbutter.

Recently, now living in Colorado, local game stores are drying up along with the bookstore chains like Borders.  Organized play helps keep the last couple of stores alive but online retailers seem to be the best option for actually buying products.         

All around helpful simian

My experience started around 1983.   I was invited to a game using the red box set and I played a fighter named Taran.  I got the name from the Prydain Chronicles by Lloyd Alexander.

Soon, I discovered AD&D 1e when I talked to a friend at school about my campaign.  I was intrigued and he sold me his used books.  I still have those books to this day.  He wrote a custom spell he'd created inside the back cover.  He was constantly having money problems and selling all his books and then turning around and buying more later.  I got many adventures and books from him over the years.

I started up campaign probably late 1983.  I was in a special county wide program and met a lot of other creative people there.  I became the DM and I've been DMing ever since.  We played 1e all the way until 2e was released and then we switched.   I went off to college in 1986 and our play time slowed some as we could only meet occasionally on weekends.   
 
During my high school years, D&D was ubiquitous.  Everyone heard of it.  I played in the breakfast cafeteria before school in a campaign.  It was serious by my standards but I played along.   There was a "hobby" shop that mostly dealt with crafts etc... but the guy had one shelf of D&D stuff.  I got most of what I have from that shop early on.

There was a lull towards the end of 2e, but by the time 3e came around I was out of college and working.   Many of my high school friends and some new people also played it quite a bit.   When 4e was announced, I embraced it and recruited a group and played it well over a year.   The campaign ended though from lack of interest due to our not liking the rules.

There are game shops about nowadays.  They come and go often.  Cards are big.  Miniatures games are popular too.  

 




The Prydain chronicles is must read material. 
Not to mention the cheesy names... "Continual Light" was translated to something that would re-translate back to English like: "Brightness of the Perpetual Dawn"... that's just... I... well, let's not get into that.

In german in the first translation the made torches into flashlights (and what's worse was that there were no batteries on the equipment list ;) )

My older brother started playing AD&D 1E in the mid-80s. I was always fascinated by Fantasy, so I begged to play. I read the PHB and most of the DMG, but the DM said I was too young. Miffed, I took my scant knowledge and worked out my own RPG, which I planned on playing with my friends. Needless to say, it would have been horrible, but my brother's DM found out about it and looked it over. He decided he wanted to teach me to play properly, because obviously I was going to play anyway. I started playing somewhere about 1988-89 (middle school) and never really stopped.

I played 1E for about 3-5 years, then my DM left us. I took over, and my days of being a player pretty much came to an end. We continued playing 1E, even after 2E came out. We didn't want to switch because of the cost (I already had all the 1E books) and because we didn't want to learn a new system. Eventually we caved in and tried 2E, but felt it needed a mix of 1E. We found what we liked from each edition and houseruled it in.

I met new players in High School and College, which opened my horizon. With new players I could occasionally play, even if I still thought of myself as a DM. I continued to play/run 2E (using a ton of houserules, but not the Player's Options - those were hellspawn to the DMs of my groups). I slowly expanded out from Greyhawk to Forgotten Realms, Dragonlance, Birthright, and quite a few others.

When 3E came out, I threw myself into it wholeheartedly. Overall, I really like it, but there were a few things that bugged me. When they did 3.5 I was miffed and refused to buy the new books. The changes were great, and everyone I knew switched from 3.0 to 3.5, but I just couldn't justify the cost to myself. By the time 4E was announced, I was ready for a new edition. The problems I had with 3E became exasperated with 3.5, and I was just sick of it by then.

I was a giant 4E fanboy from the start; the first year or so was awesome. Then things changed within my group, because the rules were seen less and less as guidelines for the DM, and more and more as restraints on the DM. The best DM I've know quit DMing, and soon quit D&D altogether. I tried to talk to him about it, but he refused. He said he didn't want to ruin my fun. Slowly, I saw what he saw, and it was 3E all over again. It was totally different problems, but the result was the same: I couldn't take the system any more. By the time Essentials came out, I was still playing 4E, but it was more to be with my friends and to RP than it was to play D&D (I mostly zoned out when combats and skill challenges came up).

I threw myself into Next with a passion. I ran packet 1 with one of my groups, and while they hated it (they are Pathfinder people), I saw great potential. I loved Packet 2, and still feel it was the best packet conceptually. Packet 3 was a great setback, IMO, but they've been improving on the core of Packet 3 with each new Packet. I have hopes and dreams for Next, but I also know that the playtest is not going the way I want. Oh well; if Next fails for me, I'll probably just work out my own version using the chassis of Next with stuff I liked Smile
I started sometime near 81, I was 12, with the Blue box and chits.  I played heavy back then on Scout trips, Church camp and the like. 

People came and went but we have a middleschool group that met weekly to play, and did the all night long thing. 

I continuted and progressed through editions till high school.  I am pretty sure it was prior to 3e (but the version may have been out for all I know).

D&D was near dead for college, I picked up 3e and it sat unused, and then grabbed 3.5 when I read about Eberron.  Played it again heavy, got my kids involved, grabed old friends, family.

Moved to 4e, started running weekly and month games at FLGS and my house.  At the same time I was also running Pathfinder.  4E fell behind, we incorporated Eberron into Pathfinder.

D&DNext started up and honestly, we've pulled in all the old advntures 1e+ and have been in playtest ever since.

∴ "Virtus junxit, mors non separabit." 

My older brother started playing AD&D 1E in the mid-80s. I was always fascinated by Fantasy, so I begged to play. I read the PHB and most of the DMG, but the DM said I was too young. Miffed, I took my scant knowledge and worked out my own RPG, which I planned on playing with my friends. Needless to say, it would have been horrible, but my brother's DM found out about it and looked it over. He decided he wanted to teach me to play properly, because obviously I was going to play anyway. I started playing somewhere about 1988-89 (middle school) and never really stopped.

I played 1E for about 3-5 years, then my DM left us. I took over, and my days of being a player pretty much came to an end. We continued playing 1E, even after 2E came out. We didn't want to switch because of the cost (I already had all the 1E books) and because we didn't want to learn a new system. Eventually we caved in and tried 2E, but felt it needed a mix of 1E. We found what we liked from each edition and houseruled it in.

I met new players in High School and College, which opened my horizon. With new players I could occasionally play, even if I still thought of myself as a DM. I continued to play/run 2E (using a ton of houserules, but not the Player's Options - those were hellspawn to the DMs of my groups). I slowly expanded out from Greyhawk to Forgotten Realms, Dragonlance, Birthright, and quite a few others.

When 3E came out, I threw myself into it wholeheartedly. Overall, I really like it, but there were a few things that bugged me. When they did 3.5 I was miffed and refused to buy the new books. The changes were great, and everyone I knew switched from 3.0 to 3.5, but I just couldn't justify the cost to myself. By the time 4E was announced, I was ready for a new edition. The problems I had with 3E became exasperated with 3.5, and I was just sick of it by then.

I was a giant 4E fanboy from the start; the first year or so was awesome. Then things changed within my group, because the rules were seen less and less as guidelines for the DM, and more and more as restraints on the DM. The best DM I've know quit DMing, and soon quit D&D altogether. I tried to talk to him about it, but he refused. He said he didn't want to ruin my fun. Slowly, I saw what he saw, and it was 3E all over again. It was totally different problems, but the result was the same: I couldn't take the system any more. By the time Essentials came out, I was still playing 4E, but it was more to be with my friends and to RP than it was to play D&D (I mostly zoned out when combats and skill challenges came up).

I threw myself into Next with a passion. I ran packet 1 with one of my groups, and while they hated it (they are Pathfinder people), I saw great potential. I loved Packet 2, and still feel it was the best packet conceptually. Packet 3 was a great setback, IMO, but they've been improving on the core of Packet 3 with each new Packet. I have hopes and dreams for Next, but I also know that the playtest is not going the way I want. Oh well; if Next fails for me, I'll probably just work out my own version using the chassis of Next with stuff I liked Smile



I fear I will be playing a houseruled watered down version of PF with idea's stolen from NEXT.  I've pretty much given up and begun designing different versions of games for myself (much harder than in looks).  Still hoping good things for NEXT.  But these post2E games are too ability score driven for me and I am not looking to playing a highly tactical game where combat is more than 20-25% of the game.  Note I said I don't want a highly tactical game not a NO tactical game.
My first exposure to D&D was First Edition in 87 I think. It was with a relatively cutthroat group who believed that PCs killing off other PCs was all part of the fun, and it did leave a bad taste in my mouth.

I reentered the hobby with 2nd Edition in 1994, and got hooked pretty much immediately. The campaign was rules loose, focusing on fun, and we all had a good time.

After that, gaming became one of my sole focuses. I started playing and reading everything under the Sun. Marvel, Shadowrun, White Wolf, obscure games like Toon and Murphy's World, Star Trek, West End's Star Wars, Robotech, literally every gaming book I could get my hands on was read, understood and absorbed. I've had a few moments in my life where that has tapered off a bit, but I always get right back on that train.

I'm here now as part of this playtest because despite reading dozens of different rulesets, there is some nebulous quality about D&D that none of the others has captured. That je ne sais quoi keeps bringing me back to D&D, so I figure I might as well help D&D keep that special element. Without that element, I've got many other rulesets I enjoy to turn to.
I remember another group that played DnD in the late 80s in our town.  They all had +5 equipment for everything and tons of magic items.  We considered them amateurs.  Unfortunately at high levels PF supports that kind of play.
Started in small town NZ in 1993 after playing Eye of the Beholder on the Amiga. We started with BECMI and a few 1st ed books as we had no game store and used whatever we could find. In 1994 we thought we were going modern with the Rules Cyclopedia. Other RPGS may as well have not existed. Switched to 2nd ed in 1995 and started to mail order off gamestores in the big cities. Every time I traveled o one of tweo places came back with a few D&D books and played a bit of 1st ed with my friends older brother as his group preferred it over 2nd ed.

 Moved to a city in 2000 and 3rd ed had just cameout and D&D was kinda big.  With 3.5 and a game store opening in 2004 and closing in 2008 had a bit of local networking and DMs could pick and choose players. Minis were briefly popular.Before the gamestore closed the final product purchased was the 4th ed core books and an extra copy of the PHB. In 2009 traveled to a different city and Pathfinder had just came out but they had sold out of the PFRPG and the shelves had a lot of early 4th ed material on them. I had played the PF beta and would have grabbed the PFRPG if they had it but saved my pennies when I found out it was $80 (RPG books being expensive in NZ anyway) and picked it up a couple of years later online.

 After that it got a bit harder to find players and several of the old group trickled off as careers took over. Local uni group ran an RPG event over 3 days recently with 4-6 games being played and not a single one was D&D or Pathfinder of any description and I tok some books along to see what people would be interested in. The 1st ed PHB an ACKs got the most atention although the 1st ed one was curiousity more than anything and probably ACKs as well. D&D has never really been massive but this is the worst I have seen it locally for a long time. Stories coming out of other cities do not seem that positive either as Auckland had 3 or 4 game stores when I went there in 2004 for minis and 1 now. 

 

 Fear is the Mind Killer

 

First of all, great topic

I began In 88 (I was 8) with playing Hero Quest. As kids we soon began attaching more roleplay and less to the game, but playing with miniatures stuck with warhammer. In the early teens I found this tattered book in the library called advanced dungeons and dragons, and being from Denmark where it's a rarety to find anything translated, it was of course in the magical language of English. Not understanding 90% of the book we non the less started to play...imagine learning thac0 without knowing the language! Most of our games quickly deteriorated in to con checks about how long we could have sex with the barmaids anyway, so probably not a lot lost on us :p

After a hiatus with mtg, warhammer and larping(which is massive in Denmark today, but wasn't back then) a friend introduced me to 3.5 and being able to understand the rules now I was hooked. A group of us played at least 30 hours a week, being students unemployed and singles for several years, branching in to story teller, sla industries, gurps, deadlands when we wanted more serious role playing, but always coming back to dnd for action games. We never bought any adventures, we made our own games, the longest ever being a planescape campaign where the premise was greyscale areas of alignments. That one campaign has made me a big supporter of allignments, I think anyone who think they are borring or restrictive needs to challange their absolute values in a game like that. An example was us as good alignments had the choice of killing a village of innocent civilians, or see the entire plane invaded by the blood war. What is the good alignment choise, we spent hours debating in character! Alignments are not as black and white as they seem at first glance, they are what you make them.

Because of the silly amounts of hours we spent on rpging, we always had several games running, this is why I'm very pro starting at higher levels, as I honestly don't think there is a dnd class out there that I haven't played at first level. This I tell myself makes me less biased when looking at classes, I don't have a favourite class, I want them all to be viable and fun.

By the time 4e came out the group had watered down due to unfortunate events such as wife's and children. And I found myself moving to England where I now have wife and baby. Over here I quickly found my self a new rpg group, and for the first time got introduced to adventure modules. It's a completely different experience than the free flow games I was used to, and it he culture around the table is very different as well. Where my Danish groups were all about explorina each others characters, and player interaction and intrigue, this is much more story and task driven. If that is just the English gaming culture I don't know or if its down to the modules play style I don't know.

Anyway, my current group is a bunch of men with wife's that graciously are looking after the kids Friday evenings, so we Can relive our teenage years. and we have made our own little annual cottage geek weekend, which coincided with the release of the first NEXT play test package. We are now testing with keen interest to see where the game is going, though I haven't submitted a single session report, mainly because I'm Too lazy to write it ;)

oh and I'm only checking the forums from smart phones and tablets, so I blame autocorrect for all my typos and formatting errors, handy :p 
I started sometime around 1980 with the bluebox and chits with a group of close friends in middle school. Reading fantasy books was the gateway to D&D. I have continued playing D&D and other RPGs ever since.
First of all, great topic

I began In 88 (I was 8) with playing Hero Quest. As kids we soon began attaching more roleplay and less to the game, but playing with miniatures stuck with warhammer. In the early teens I found this tattered book in the library called advanced dungeons and dragons, and being from Denmark where it's a rarety to find anything translated, it was of course in the magical language of English. Not understanding 90% of the book we non the less started to play...imagine learning thac0 without knowing the language! Most of our games quickly deteriorated in to con checks about how long we could have sex with the barmaids anyway, so probably not a lot lost on us :p

After a hiatus with mtg, warhammer and larping(which is massive in Denmark today, but wasn't back then) a friend introduced me to 3.5 and being able to understand the rules now I was hooked. A group of us played at least 30 hours a week, being students unemployed and singles for several years, branching in to story teller, sla industries, gurps, deadlands when we wanted more serious role playing, but always coming back to dnd for action games. We never bought any adventures, we made our own games, the longest ever being a planescape campaign where the premise was greyscale areas of alignments. That one campaign has made me a big supporter of allignments, I think anyone who think they are borring or restrictive needs to challange their absolute values in a game like that. An example was us as good alignments had the choice of killing a village of innocent civilians, or see the entire plane invaded by the blood war. What is the good alignment choise, we spent hours debating in character! Alignments are not as black and white as they seem at first glance, they are what you make them.

Because of the silly amounts of hours we spent on rpging, we always had several games running, this is why I'm very pro starting at higher levels, as I honestly don't think there is a dnd class out there that I haven't played at first level. This I tell myself makes me less biased when looking at classes, I don't have a favourite class, I want them all to be viable and fun.

By the time 4e came out the group had watered down due to unfortunate events such as wife's and children. And I found myself moving to England where I now have wife and baby. Over here I quickly found my self a new rpg group, and for the first time got introduced to adventure modules. It's a completely different experience than the free flow games I was used to, and it he culture around the table is very different as well. Where my Danish groups were all about explorina each others characters, and player interaction and intrigue, this is much more story and task driven. If that is just the English gaming culture I don't know or if its down to the modules play style I don't know.

Anyway, my current group is a bunch of men with wife's that graciously are looking after the kids Friday evenings, so we Can relive our teenage years. and we have made our own little annual cottage geek weekend, which coincided with the release of the first NEXT play test package. We are now testing with keen interest to see where the game is going, though I haven't submitted a single session report, mainly because I'm Too lazy to write it ;)

oh and I'm only checking the forums from smart phones and tablets, so I blame autocorrect for all my typos and formatting errors, handy :p 



 Guilty. We were 16 or so. Also wife and kids are not that importantTongue Out

 Fear is the Mind Killer

 

I encountered the game in the summer of '80.  My mother liked to shop & would drag my brother & I along (when we'd much rather be home/over at grandmas playing with our Star Wars/Empire Strikes Back toys) to the local mall - wich we weren't allowed to go explore on our own at age 10.   And believe me, we tried that.  It did not end well for us once we got home....
So we had a basic choice:  Tag along with her through department after department of her favorite store & be utterly bored, or hang out in that stores (pretty nice) book department & only be mostly bored.  At the end of the shopping trip if we'd been good she'd take us to the toy store or arcade in the mall.
Guess wich we chose?

Anyways, I found the AD&D books on the stores book shelves.  Mostly I was drawn to the Monster Manual & Dieties & Demigods book.  I came to realize that this was some kind of game.  Though at the time I never did figure out how to play.  Partly because the whole set of books was never poresent all at once, partly because it's a bit hard to piece AD&D together by reading random parts of it once a week or so.  But it was interesting....

Flash forward to us making our Christmas lists later that year.  One of the things I put on my list was "Dungeons & Dragons - game".
Mom had apparrently heard of the game.  Or at least bad things about it.
Grandma, thank God, had not.   SHE thought a game where you prtended to be elves & knights etc & fought monsters sounded like fun.  And as she'd later put it "I can relate to knights fighting dragons more than I can all that plastic Darth Vader stuff."
And so, without consulting Mom, she got me the D&D basic set for Christmas 1980.

Mom wasn't happy.  (we'd learn this years later)  Afterall, she'd heard bad things about this game.
So apparently, after we kids had gone to bed, her & Dad sat up all night reading & even trying out the game.
Had they not approved of what they found the game would've been accidently "forgotten" when we left for home the next day.
It came home with us.

For the first couple of years it was just me, my younger brother, our cousin, & a friend playing.  We didn't know anyone else who played.
Eventually, about '83, we found some other kids at school who either played or were interested.
And thus began a weekly D&D game at my house that ran until we went off to college.
Later we learned that Mom was 100% in favor of this hosting arrangment as it allowed her to keep tabs on not only the 4 of us, but our friends as well.  Guess her & a few of the other moms got into it about our playing that "Devils Game".  They got put in their place as Mom spelled out that it was A) a game, B) she knew ALOT more about what their children were up to than they did (& not just D&D wise) and that was why the game was hosted in her kitchen as oppossed to somewhere else.  Turns out she fought one of these battles for us at church too.  There was no more trouble after that.

Somewhere in those years we added all kinds of other RPGs & eventually miniture wargames to the mix. 

'89/90-95?  College.  Played 2nd ed.  Spent a few years in the WoD.  
'96-2006?  Life + An extended tour of duty through (mostly) the miniture battlefields of the 41st mill.
2007-now?  Life + A mix of miniture wargaming & (mostly) 3x/PF.  Though recently I've also gotten to return to AD&D   

Wow,reading all this I feel like a kid compared to some of you guys :P

As a kid i loved computer games and i was hooked on rpg especially. First time I heard about D&D was when i got Baldur's gate in january of '99 at the age of 10. I liked it a lot. Then i didn't know what D&D was,never heard about it and not even knew that there are things like p&p rpgs. Most of people didn't even play computer and video games (except maybe pro evolution soccer). So i played most of rpg classics of that time and enjoyed them immensely. In that time there were no game shops in my home town (Zagreb,Croatia). 

Fast forward to 2003 when I started high school. I meet this guys from class that were like my fantasy and sf fans.  Oh,and we were all metalheads who loved power metal :P So this one time we were hanging out and talking and one of these guys mentioned D&D and after a bit talk we started playing our first ever campaign. At the same time some people from my little social circle introduced me to the oWoD. Needless to say,i spent rest of the high school playing d&d and V:tM. Also,first and only game shop in town opened around those years,but books were very expensive so we played with just core books (well we were going out a lot,concerts were also not cheap,at least booze and cigarettes were cheap and available to minors XD).  I love those times. There were 4-6 of us regulars,meeting at our DMs house at saturday and playing from 11-17. And DM was great. He had his own homebrew world on which he spent few years to make. Lots of cool drawings,maps,etc. He even made inn menues. Unfortunatley,this group fell apart in 2007 when we all went our separate ways.

2007-now
College years. This is most productive period of gaming in terms of diversity. I meet this great new group of people trough one of the frends from high school and we hit it right from the start. We played mostly 3,5/pf,but also nWoD,7th sea,window,GURPS and right now we play Next and Witchcraft. Oh,and once again,we don't have game shop in town. Thank god for internet shoping.  

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/20.jpg)

I had an older cousin who had discovered D&D in the late '70s or early '80s.  At family gatherings, playing D&D was a "big kid" activity, and eventual inclusion in that family "clique" was something the younger kids looked forward to.  In the mid-80s, I was given my very first, rather used copy of the Red Box, which I treasured and still have.  I very quickly moved on to 1e AD&D, but returned to BECMI when the Rules Compendium came out, only switching to 2e in the 7th grade.  In the small rural midwestern high school I attended, there was no social stigma attached to playing D&D, since all the starting varsity football players were avid gamers.

By college, I played GURPS almost exclusively, and gamed mostly with people who shared my interest in historical re-enactment and classic fantasy literature.  To this day, I love constructing well-researched and accurate medieval cultures and economies in my games. I like to use a replica 14th century breastplate that I made for a DM screen.  
farm8.staticflickr.com/7102/7303472802_2...

It was 2e's psionics book that drove me away from D&D and into the arms of GURPS; I returned briefly for 3e/3.5e, and was initially enthusiastic about 4e, welcoming the edition's dedication to making sure that the Fighter--my favorite class by far--didn't suck compared to the spellcasters.  I played a year-long campaign of 4e and concluded that it wasn't for me--it didn't feel right somehow. 5e looks neat so far, and I have enjoyed introducing my daughter to both it and to 1e.

I still live in the college town, which limits my recruiting pool somewhat, and I consequently tend to game with younger folks, though I am highly selective about them. Something happened to the culture in the mid-to-late '90s, and the influence of anime grew. I hated it at first, but have since learned how to deal with gamers whose visions of fantasy worlds have been shaped by anime and JRPGs.

My longest-running group consisted of my wife, two other college-aged women, and two college-aged men, one of whom was a very devoted otaku.  Much of my irritation with that segment of the gaming population stems from my experience DM/GMing for this group and dealing with the antics of his characters, who were commonly the closest thing he could find to a catgirl in whatever setting we happened to be using.

If you have to resort to making offensive comments instead of making logical arguments, you deserve to be ignored.

  Oh,and we were all metalheads who loved power metal :P  



Eh, eh. I'm a metalhead too. Mostly power stuff like Manowar, Blind Guardian, Rage and Savatage with some prog like SymphonyX...

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/23.jpg)

I can only tell what the progression was like in the part of the netherlands where I live.

DnD was basicly not availible in shops pre ADnD 2nd, you could have some comic stores import it from the US or UK if you realy wanted it but it was pretty expensive to do so.

First game that got a biger folowing was Warhammer tabletop fantasy battles that was sold trough moddel shops.
And the game heroquest en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HeroQuest. witch was released in the same year as ADnd 2nd.
At this time more comic stores started to have AdnD 2nd on the shelves.

After 1993 ( maybe like 1994 or 1995 )magic the gathering became a big hype and we saw the opening of the first game shops.
Besides Magic the gathering they did sell AdnD 2nd, but as far as i know retailers at that point coulden't order directly from TSR.
meaning there where middel man the order time was long and it was still expensive.

The main Boom for DnD came with the release of 3rd edition that used the much more efficient WOTC/Hasbro distribution system that was already in place.


so players of early editions are rare, personaly i never met a person who played version of DnD before ADnD 2nd exept when traveling abroad.
There is a small group like me that started with ADnD 2nd, but i think in my area 75% who play DnD started with 3rd.



I think that in general this is a reasonable description of D&D in the Netherlands. There was some earlier D&D stuff. The early 80's cartoon TV series was broadcast here somewhere in the late eighties and I remember an article about D&D in some cartoon magazine, I think it was Wham! which I read at the time.

But in general both D&D and MtG started around 1992-94 with AD&D 2E and got a big boost around 2000 as the books became much more available. My friendly local game store (www.wirwar.nl) just celebrated it's 20th anniversary.

I started playing AD&D 2E somewhere around 1996, with a friend who had been playing it for a few years. I know of one other group who started around the same time. Getting books was really hard, we only had 2 PHBs and 1 DMG and MM. 3E and proper availability of books and materials, websites and forums was a huge breath of fresh air and a major boost, it allowed you to be part of a community for the first time.

I tihnk most of the interest in D&D came from people being involved in the early internet from 1990 onwards, discovering MUDs, newsgroups and such in the years before the world wide Web was established. The early internet was filled with USA Geek culture. I remember things like the Virtual World Club of New Mexico, which I used to connect to a lot from over here in the Netherlands after I got internet in 1994. D&D is very much related to the internet for me.

D&D never got huge in the Netherlands as it was never translated into Dutch. This means on those with a good grasp of English and the specific D&D legalese get to play. The number of PhDs in the D&D community is around 50% where I live. I think the D&D community is only about 5% of the size of the MtG community and even that is still a fringe hobby, but most game and toy stores will carry the cards.

4E never really caught on where I live. There are mostly 3E and PF groups. The 3.5 SRD is the main recruiting tool.

5e should strongly stay away from "I don't like it, so you can't have it either."

 

I once asked the question (in D&D 3.5) "Does a Druid4/Wizard3/ArcaneHierophant1 have Wildshape?". Jesse Decker and Andy Collins: Yes and the text is clear and can't be interpreted differently. Rich Redman and Ed Stark: No and the text is clear and can't be interpreted differently. Skip Williams: Lol, it's worded ambiguously and entirely not how I intended it. (Cust. Serv. Reference# 050815-000323)


It was 2e's psionics book that drove me away from D&D and into the arms of GURPS; I returned briefly for 3e/3.5e, and was initially enthusiastic about 4e, welcoming the edition's dedication to making sure that the Fighter--my favorite class by far--didn't suck compared to the spellcasters.  I played a year-long campaign of 4e and concluded that it wasn't for me--it didn't feel right somehow. 5e looks neat so far, and I have enjoyed introducing my daughter to both it and to 1e.



Awesome screen you have there, mate!

I'm curious as to why the Psionics drove you away from 2e.
Personally I find the 2e Psionics Handbook a masterpiece. Very well done, interesting systems different from regular spells and such, very interesting and unique powers... and you can see as you read the book that they put a lot of effort and research into making the Psionicist seem like a real (even if fictitious) exploration of the untapped powers of the mind, using many actual psychological concepts and translating that into fantasious "mental abilities".

Other versions of the Psionicist from newer editions I didn't like at all, I must say. They felt to me just like a Wizard-variant with similar shinny spells that came from the mind instead of elsewhere. Not that I have anything against the Wizard class from those editions necessarily, but these "newer" Psionicists just failed to capture the essence of the idea like that 2E one did, imho.

Now I understand that using Psionics in a D&D game is not for any campaign. If you like a traditional medieval fantasy, or are more historical-based campaign, Psionics will probably just feel out of place entirely. Nonetheless, for a setting that is "prepared" to receive Psionics into it (like they did with Dark Sun), I found the Psionics in 2E a fantastic class!

So I'm curious as to why you disliked it so much that it actually drove you away from D&D?
Considering you could always not use Psionics in the game too.


BTW, not criticizing your decision or point of view here, just genuinely curious. Wink
In November of 1981, my best friends (twins) got the red box set from another friend of theirs at their 12th birthday party. I remember them opening it at the party in the bowling alley and looking at it like 'gee, thanks Doug, this looks...cool', Doug said from the back of the throng of kids (they always had huge birthday parties) 'Don't worry, you'll love it'. It then got lost in the mountain of gifts for a couple of weeks.

Bored one Saturday their older brother (20 at the time), opened it and read it. He came and found us and said we should give this a try. I still remember coloring in the dice with the crayon that came in it. One twin made a Fighter, the other a Dwarf, and I made an Elf. Their older brother became the DM and made a pseudo-NPC Cleric which we eventually figured out was his way of bailing us out of stupid decisions. We completed Keep on the Borderlands, but my Elf did not. He turned into a pile of goo in the cursed cavern. Had to make a Thief afterwards. We then did the Palace of the Silver Princess. 

During the Palace module, I found the AD&D books at a local bookstore, bought the DMG, PHB, MM and Deities and Demigods (which I still have that original book). Brought them all to their house and we converted to AD&D after the Palace module. I ended up becoming a Gnome (continuity has never been a strongsuit when it came to my PCs). We then went through the Slave Lords modules, DM created quests focusing on each PC (the Dwarf got a Dwarven Thrower, can't even remember what mine was for, probably because it wasn't very cool), Dwellers of the Forbidden City, Expedition to the Barrier Peaks, and then two DM made modules which brought an end to that campaign. Still my favorite campaign of all time, its like a cherry-buzz. I still remember making sandwiches for the DM for extra XP. By then I was 14, and other activities started to take over my attention.

6 years later in College I found 2E in a hobby shop, I didn't play much but I loved reading the books. It wasn't until 1999 when 4 guys I met through my IT career wanted to play. All of them had read the books when younger but never had played an organized campaign. We did 2E till 3E was released. We have been playing a semi-regular game ever since. I mostly DM, with one other guy having run a campaing from 1st through 13th level. We have probably run through 7 other campaigns, and a lot of one-offs, especially since the start of the playtest.

Next year, I want to introduce the game to my two kids who will be 11 and 8 at that time. I am writing that up right now.
A RPG wasn't a family game for most players I known until recently, with the the first players becoming parents and the geeks rising in power around the world with internet.




The geek shall inherit the earth.

For me it all started with fantasy fiction . . .

Growning up in the 80's in South Western Ontario, Canada. I wasn't doing well in school. 

My Unlce who teaches at a large University takes me to the book store and introduces me to fantasy fiction.

This changes my life in a huge way. Now I'm reading all the time. I can't get enough fantasy fiction.

While looking for new books to read at a local store, I find a bunch of " Fighting Fantasy " books.

These books blow my mind and I begin collecting and reading every one I can find.

A few months later my best friend gets the " Red Box " for a birthday gift.

After just one game, I'm now buying and collecting all the D & D stuff I can find and reading D & D fiction . . .

Over the years I've played all editions of D & D and enjoyed them all for different reasons.

I have high hopes that D & D Next / 5 E will be a great success.

Right now I'm playing D & D 2 E, D & D 4 E and Pathfinder.

I don't use miniatures. Just books, dice, maps and plastic coloured game pieces.

I get everything from Amazon.ca / .com, Chapters.ca, Paizo.com and DriveThruRPG.com . . .

It helps keep the cost down.

On a side note -

This is a great topic ! ! !



My first exposure to D&D was when my sister and I would play very rules-lite D&D with mom (basically just interactive stories).  Mom was in very poor health and bed-ridden but she noticed I enjoyed reading the Hobbit.  When we passed the Player's Handbook in the store (the one with the jewel thief on the cover), and I stopped to look, she picked it up for me.  How cool is that ;)?

I think that's a major reason why I still love D&D to this day.  It gave me some quality time with mom that I wouldn't have otherwise had.  My sister has  moved on, never stuck with D&D, but it's a lifelong hobby for me. 

= = =

I started playing seriously around '83 when I picked up the red box with the dragon by Elmore (BECM). My friends and I played all through junior high, then we moved and I found another group in high school. That was right around the time 2nd Edition came out.  Our DM told us:  "Hey this game is so simple even you guys can understand it!" Smart ass ;).

Anyway, I've stayed with the game thru 3e, v3.5, 4e, DDE (which to be honest, nearly lost me), and now DDN.  Had some great fun, made some lifelong friends along the way.  D&D is my game.  
/\ Art
  Oh,and we were all metalheads who loved power metal :P  



Eh, eh. I'm a metalhead too. Mostly power stuff like Manowar, Blind Guardian, Rage and Savatage with some prog like SymphonyX...



Side note and bit a off topic,but connected. Most of D&D players and rpg fans in general I meet over the years were metalheads. My highschool oWoD group was gothic/black metal bunch,and D&D was more power/heavy/thrash. Maybe it's somehow connected. 

For all the metalheads here who play d&d a song that describes tipical campaign :P

www.youtube.com/watch?v=MM_c_avPlx4 

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/20.jpg)

  Oh,and we were all metalheads who loved power metal :P  



Eh, eh. I'm a metalhead too. Mostly power stuff like Manowar, Blind Guardian, Rage and Savatage with some prog like SymphonyX...



Side note and bit a off topic,but connected. Most of D&D players and rpg fans in general I meet over the years were metalheads. My highschool oWoD group was gothic/black metal bunch,and D&D was more power/heavy/thrash. Maybe it's somehow connected. 

For all the metalheads here who play d&d a song that describes tipical campaign :P

www.youtube.com/watch?v=MM_c_avPlx4 




I do like some good metal, but when I was 14 it was all about D&D and Allan Holdsworth for me.
  Oh,and we were all metalheads who loved power metal :P  



Eh, eh. I'm a metalhead too. Mostly power stuff like Manowar, Blind Guardian, Rage and Savatage with some prog like SymphonyX...



THE single most underrated band of all time.  It amazes me how many people have never heard of Savatage.

"Lightning...it flashes bright, then fades away.  It can't protect, it can only destroy."

  Oh,and we were all metalheads who loved power metal :P  



Eh, eh. I'm a metalhead too. Mostly power stuff like Manowar, Blind Guardian, Rage and Savatage with some prog like SymphonyX...



THE single most underrated band of all time.  It amazes me how many people have never heard of Savatage.





Or Buckethead.
  Oh,and we were all metalheads who loved power metal :P  



Eh, eh. I'm a metalhead too. Mostly power stuff like Manowar, Blind Guardian, Rage and Savatage with some prog like SymphonyX...



Side note and bit a off topic,but connected. Most of D&D players and rpg fans in general I meet over the years were metalheads. My highschool oWoD group was gothic/black metal bunch,and D&D was more power/heavy/thrash. Maybe it's somehow connected. 

For all the metalheads here who play d&d a song that describes tipical campaign :P

www.youtube.com/watch?v=MM_c_avPlx4 



Here's one I was introduced to early in High School that I always thought fit D&D.

It's a bit old, but give it a chance.  I've -never- met a D&D player who didn't like it.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=aiN2_ks9klc

"Lightning...it flashes bright, then fades away.  It can't protect, it can only destroy."

Anjelika,that song is so nice. Especially live. When you are in first row :P No more off topic,I promise. :D It's just that topics like this one bring out lots of good memories and a bit of nostalgia creeps in. :D

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/20.jpg)

Anjelika,that song is so nice. Especially live. When you are in first row :P No more off topic,I promise. :D It's just that topics like this one bring out lots of good memories and a bit of nostalgia creeps in. :D



Oh I am soooooo jealous.

Ahem!  Yes, back on topic!  Sorry everyone!

"Lightning...it flashes bright, then fades away.  It can't protect, it can only destroy."

  Oh,and we were all metalheads who loved power metal :P  



Eh, eh. I'm a metalhead too. Mostly power stuff like Manowar, Blind Guardian, Rage and Savatage with some prog like SymphonyX...



Side note and bit a off topic,but connected. Most of D&D players and rpg fans in general I meet over the years were metalheads. My highschool oWoD group was gothic/black metal bunch,and D&D was more power/heavy/thrash. Maybe it's somehow connected. 

For all the metalheads here who play d&d a song that describes tipical campaign :P

www.youtube.com/watch?v=MM_c_avPlx4 




QFT, that song IS all about epic gaming.
Let's see....for me, I started just at the tail end of 1st Edition, but managed to play both that and Basic D&D (a friend had the books) before moving on to 2nd Edition. I'd say that was the edition that I really cut my teeth on, both playing and DM'ing.

It didn't take long at all for me to end up DM'ing some games, and I learned a lot - mostly from my mistakes. I'll admit I made a lot of them back then, but who doesn't when they start running games?

After that, it was only a matter of time before I started trying other games, as folks pointed them out to me - TSR's Marvel Super Heroes and Palladium's Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Other Strangeness were early forays outside of D&D, as well as WEG's Star Wars (later I'd play the d20 version as well) and BattleTech. That's where I stayed through the early 90's for the most part. Another friend pointed out a game called Vampire: the Masquerade, and I initially was against it - I mean, playing the monster? No thanks.

It wasn't until a friend of mine in AIT (for those who don't know, that's the thing you do in the US Army after Basic Training; it stands for Advanced Individual Training - basically, that's where they teach you your job) introduced me to Werewolf: the Apocalypse that I took a chance on the World of Darkness. It was much different from what I was used to, but in a good way, and I took to the game immediately.

I learned it was another game line similar to Vampire, and I further discovered the rest of the game lines, but didn't play any of them at first. A friend of mine had joined a LARP in college, and was playing live-action Werewolf: the Apocalypse, so I thought to give that a try. I bought the werewolf book, visited, and joined in a game.

That's when the World of Darkness got its hooks in me and hasn't let go since.

Since then, I've played and/or run nearly every game line White Wolf has put out for the World of Darkness (so not counting things like Street Fighter, Aberrant, or Trinity), in both/either tabletop or LARP formats. This includes both the "classic" and "new" versions of the World of Darkness, although the nWoD is my preference. I have every book put out for the WoD with the exception of the full version of the God-Machine Chronicle book (although I have the free rules update); that's something I plan on fixing as soon as possible.

I own, but have never managed to play, Exalted (at least the 1st edition book).

I was part of the Camarilla, at the time "White Wolf's Official Fan Club," although now they are just a fan club and are called the "Mind's Eye Society." (And I'm no longer a member.) While in that organization - for about 10 years - I served as a Storyteller at every level of the club, from local to global, sometimes holding positions at differing levels simultaneously, which I do not recommend ever. 

And of course I've most recently had the good fortune to accidentally (seriously!) back my group into playtesting the upcoming Demon: the Descent game, which was a great time (and the game is really, really well done - I recommend it in general, as it brings a level of espionage into the WoD).

I haven't let the WoD monopolize my time, though. I moved to D&D 3rd Edition when that came out, and then made the switch to 3.5 (slightly annoyed though I was). I revisited some older games like Marvel and TMNT, introducing them to new people. I've played Traveller, Legend of the Five Rings, and have done other games using rules adapted from Pike & Shot & Zombies, as well as played a Conan game using the Crom rules. I tried 4E, but found that ultimately I didn't care for it. And of course I've run a few games of the DDN playtest, but haven't for a while both due to real life and because the Demon playtest window was much smaller and that took precedence (and then we liked the game and story so much that we've kept playing).

As for my culture, I'd say that I have almost always played with friends, even within the Camarilla. While I came into contact with a ton of people, particularly when serving three times at the Global level (twice in the same position, once as the assistant to that position), I didn't necessarily game with them. At local games or when traveling, I tended to gravitate toward friends - either friends from the local area who had also gone to that event, or friends I'd met online and was meeting for the first time (or was seeing again at a convention after not seeing them perhaps for years).

Convention-wise, I've only attended Camarilla-specific conventions for the most part. My first con experience had me not only attending the convention, but running a game. I ended up running a Werewolf: the Forsaken game in three sessions (Thursday night, Friday afternoon, Saturday morning) for approximately 150 people. Happily, a number of folks volunteered to be on staff on site when they saw I didn't have enough people (hey, it was my first convention! I didn't know what to expect!), and in the end it turned out very well.

I probably could go on and on, but I think I'll end it with the following: no matter what I've done, gaming-wise, I've always tried to find the fun. Sometimes that just wasn't possible - ultimately, 4E wasn't for me, and ultimately I had too many problems with the direction of the Camarilla to remain in it, despite the awesome people I met (and still keep in touch with). However, I'm happy to say that the times that wasn't possible are grossly outnumbered by the times I could find the fun, and have a great time with old friends, current friends, or friends I had yet to meet. And that's really all I can ask for, I think.
 

For those confused on how DDN's modular rules might work, this may provide some insight: http://www.tor.com/blogs/2012/11/the-world-of-darkness-shines-when-it-abandons-canon

@mikemearls: Uhhh... do you really not see all the 3e/4e that's basically the entire core system?

 

It is entirely unnecessary to denigrate someone else's approach to gaming in order to validate your own.

Anjelika,that song is so nice. Especially live. When you are in first row :P No more off topic,I promise. :D It's just that topics like this one bring out lots of good memories and a bit of nostalgia creeps in. :D



Oh I am soooooo jealous.

Ahem!  Yes, back on topic!  Sorry everyone!




To me music and RPGs have always been intertwined. And that's true for some bands out there.  

A couple of songs directly inspired by D&D (actually Raistlin both times) for those who never heard about them:
Raistlin and the Rose by Lake of Tears
The Soulforged by Blind Guardian   

And other two directly inspired by RPGs:
In the Dragon's Den  by SymphonyX (about exploring a dungeon)
The Relic  by SymphonyX (about an evil artifact)

  
  

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/23.jpg)

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