AssasSeekVenger

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I've been noodling something for a while and would like some feedback. This is my first suggestion here, so if I'm not providing enough (or too much) info, just let me know. Also, apologies if somebody has already built this.

A few years back I went on the hunt for the "perfect archer" and eventually gave up after bouncing back and forth between the usual suspects (seemed like people had already solved this problem and I wasn't coming up with anything different). And more recently I have thinking about trying to build a ranged Avenger. So these two ideas have collided and here's where I stand now.

Caveat: Let me state in advance that what I'm going for here is "optimized in a box." I.e., I'm fully aware that there are harder hitting characters out there (by a long shot), but I'm interested in pushing *this* particular concept as far as I can go.

The basic idea is to somehow exploit the Avenger's OoE capability in the ranged arena.

The AssasSeekVenger
Class: Hybrid Avenger/Assassin, MC Seeker
Race: Drow
Weapons/Implements: Hand Xbow, Ki Focus, maybe a Dagger
Feats: Primal Sharpshooter (to get Primal Eye), Expertise, Ruthless Hunter, Distant Vengeance, Painful Oath, Primal Eye, Focus or similar
Gear: basic +3 stuff, the only things that are crucial are Eagle Eye Goggles, Bracers of the Perfect Shot

So here's the big crux of it. Since we're a Hybrid Avenger, our OoE is restricted by this:
"you can apply the effect only when you make a melee attack using an avenger power or an avenger paragon path power."
But then we have Distant Vengeance, which says this:
"As long as you are within 10 squares of your oath of enmity target and no other enemies are adjacent to you, you gain the benefit of your oath of enmity on all ranged basic attacks against your oath of enmity target."
My read on this is that OoE will now apply to RBAs as long as they qualify under Distant Vengeance, whether or not they are Avenger powers. If you agree, then awesome. If not, then tell me why (the concept of general/specific here is somewhat ambiguous me thinks). I *think* there are plenty of analogous examples of why this *does* work, but I certainly understand that some might not agree with it. For now, let's assume it works.

Assume lvl15. And I'll only look at offense for now, but leave room for defense, too.

Our 15th level RBA looks like this:
+23 to hit, with double OoE rolls
+7 DEX, +7 LVL, +2 PROF, +3 ENH (ki focus, probably), +2 EXP FEAT, +2 ITEM (eagle eye)
DAMAGE:
1d8 (xbow) +7 DEX +3 ENH +2 FEAT (or could be 3) +4 ITEM (bracers) +2d8 (attack finesse) +5 (primal eye) +7 (painful oath)
CRIT:
retain high crit even if using ki focus, so this would be decent.

This doesn't take any PP stuff into account, or frost cheese or whatever else you might want to add.
The two PPs that seem best to me are boring old Morninglord and Occular Adept, which is much more intresting.

Other power choices: Doesn't matter really, but can grab some decent implement Avenger and Assassin powers to make your everyday combat life interesting.

With Cloud of Darkness and other possibilies (Shadowdance Armor), this character would be happy to shoot folks at point blank, too, which would make playing it more fun.

--

If the Distant Vengeance interpretation above doesn't work, then we could:

Go straight Avenger, possibly MC Seeker or Paragon MC Seeker to get loads of weirdo RBAs
Go Half-elf to pick up Twin Strike
Get some Shadowdance Armor
Use a Superior Xbow

The idea would be to optimize for two different situations:
ranged: pump RBA stuff (primal eye, etc.) as above
"melee": use Twin Strike at point blank to get OoE rolls and... well... 'cause it's funny.
PPs that would work, among others: Morninglord, Occular Adept, Paragon MC as Seeker

This is all less exciting than the first one, except for the shoot-you-in-the-eyeball-from-two-feet-away idea.

--

Thoughts, improvements, criticism, tomatoes thrown at my head? Again, remember that I'm trying to "optimize in a box," but even saying that I'm sure that there are lots of things I could do better, so please let me know!
um... just came back to check and noticed that there are a number of other avenger/executioner builds being discussed right now. that's pretty randomly coincidental since i posted without reading any of the recent stuff. anyways, hopefully we can learn a few things from each other.
It works fine if you assume the reading of Distant Vengeance that works with non-class RBAs on hybrids.  But many don't.  Worth being aware that it has provoked many large arguments.
Harrying your Prey, the Easy Way: A Hunter's Handbook - the first of what will hopefully be many CharOp efforts on my part. The Blinker - teleport everywhere. An Eladrin Knight/Eldritch Knight. CB != rules source.
It works fine if you assume the reading of Distant Vengeance that works with non-class RBAs on hybrids.  But many don't.  Worth being aware that it has provoked many large arguments.



understood. there's a non-hybrid version that works, too, but it seems a lot less potent.

from the other thread:

Nice idea, also has some damage potential. Didnt konw about the feat Painful Oath. What about MC skald instead of seeker for skald aura procs with RBAs?? Or add skald with Traveler's Harlequin? Also, if you use Avenging Shackles as your RBA you could add the feat world serpent's grasp for some control.



ya. Painful Oath is like old faithful for optimizing avenger builds. World Serpent's Grasp possible, but i don't actually want things prone 'cause i'm an archer, right? also, i want the RBA to be a weapon attack to keep the executioner damage bonus on there.

re skald's aura, i'm not following you yet. what's the suggestion exactly?
Since we're a Hybrid Avenger, our OoE is restricted by this:
"you can apply the effect only when you make a melee attack using an avenger power or an avenger paragon path power."
But then we have Distant Vengeance, which says this:
"As long as you are within 10 squares of your oath of enmity target and no other enemies are adjacent to you, you gain the benefit of your oath of enmity on all ranged basic attacks against your oath of enmity target."



As long as your DM accepts that the Feat overrides the Hybrid version of your "Hybrid and thus less good" class feature and, by extension, accepts that "Hybrid Oath Of Enmity" is the same as "Oath Of Enmity", looks good.

Expect table variation.  Because some DMs will not consider "Hybrid X" to be "X".

Confused about Stealth? Think "invisibility" means "take the mini off the board to make people guess?" You need to check out The Rules Of Hidden Club.
Damage types and resistances: A working house rule.
For my archer ranger, i was looking at the PPs travelers harlekin and darkstrider. Darkstrider has some damage potential if you can stealth all the time (lV 10 persitent tail, enshrouding candle).

But travelers harlekin opens some nova potential, if you choose all the striker extra damage feats (sneak attack, warlocks curse, hunters quarry, etc.), in addition to a very nice polymorph power at LV12, which has some very fun role playing potential, if you're good at bluff (use MC feats to train bluff, maybe).

I myself took the traveler.

Want anime-style Power cards? Then try the Touhou Power Cards!

Darkstrider is a good one, certainly.

Traveler's Harlequin is just a barrel of fun though. You can do so much with it. I had a Bard once with all those MC feats that could absolutely obliterate a monster in one fell swoop, but only once/day. It wasn't really playable, but it was funny. I feel somewhat similarly about stocking up on the MC feats for the archer; by the time you've oathed and quarried and cursed something (while also trying to move), it might have died by other means. Nonetheless, it's a fun idea, to be sure. 
Expect table variation.  Because some DMs will not consider "Hybrid X" to be "X".

Rr that.  Although for feat prerequisites "Hybrid X" = "X".
Rr that.



sorry... not sure what "rr" means.

re feat prereqs, i'm certain that i qualify for the feat; i'm just not completely certain i gain anything from it.

Rr that.

sorry... not sure what "rr" means.

Guess I'm making up stuff. "Rr that" is short for "Roger that."  Defined in urbandictionary.com as "I understand" or "I hear you."

re feat prereqs, i'm certain that i qualify for the feat; i'm just not completely certain i gain anything from it.

It works fine if you assume the reading of Distant Vengeance that works with non-class RBAs on hybrids.  But many don't.  Worth being aware that it has provoked many large arguments.

thespaceinvader has it right.  It's one of the "Ask your DM" questions.  I agree with your interpretation in any case. RAW, the feat Distant Vengeance does exactly what it says it does, for both avengers and hybrid avengers, which both meet the prerequisites.

--

A corollary An analogous example I could think of is Darkhunter, the drow ranger paragon feat that lets you break normal 'rules' dealing with the ranger striker At-Will class feature "Hunter's Quarry" (HQ),  normally limited to dealing the extra damage once per round, lasting until the end of the encounter unless over-ridden by target death or reapplication of HQ on a new quarry.  Hybrid ranger adds the stipulation, "you can deal the extra damage only when you hit your quarry with a ranger power or a ranger paragon path power." In the case of a multiclass ranger (Warrior of the Wild), HQ can only be used once per encounter (instead of At-Will) and only grants extra damage effect until the end of your next turn (two potential extra damage instances).

Darkhunter Benefit: "When you use the cloud of darkness racial power, each enemy within the cloud is designated as your quarry until it is no longer within the cloud. These quarries don’t count toward the normal limit of one quarry, and any other creature designated as your quarry remains so. You can deal Hunter’s Quarry damage against each quarry that you hit in the cloud."

Warrior of the Wild (Hunter's Quarry) Benefit: "Once per encounter, you can use the ranger's Hunter's Quarry class feature. The target you designate as your quarry remains your quarry until the end of your next turn."

A multiclass, pure, or hybrid ranger is eligible to take the Darkhunter feat, which breaks several constraints of both the multiclass Hunter's Quarry benefit and pure/hybrid ranger class feature.

Warrior of the Wild OR Pure/Hybrid Ranger: LIMIT to using Hunter's Quarry once per encounter (MC Ranger) OR once per turn (Pure/Hybrid Ranger).
WITH Darkhunter: PLUS automatic Hunter's Quarry applied to any creature within CoD

Warrior of the Wild OR Pure/Hybrid Ranger: LIMIT to one Hunter's Quarry target per encounter (MC Ranger) OR one Hunter's Quarry target at a time (Pure/Hybrid Ranger)
WITH Darkhunter: PLUS automatic Hunter's Quarry applied to any creature within CoD

Warrior of the Wild OR Pure/Hybrid Ranger: LIMIT extra damage vs. quarry to once per round
WITH Darkhunter: PLUS any creature hit within CoD takes Hunter's Quarry Damage

Hybrid Ranger (only): Only deal extra damage when you hit your quarry with a ranger power or a ranger PP power

As the above illustrates, Darkhunter allows any ranger (multiclass, hybrid, or pure) to have multiple quarries at a time and deal Hunter's Quarry extra damage multiple times in a round as long as the targets remain within Cloud of Darkness (which could also be extended through several means). The only constraint that Darkhunter doesn't explicitly override is the Hybrid Ranger class feature constraint. Since each creature in CoD is treated as "your quarry," as a hybrid ranger you still only deal the extra damage when hitting with a ranger or ranger PP power.

--

In comparison/contrast, the Distant Vengeance feat can be taken by any multiclass (via Hero of Faith or Disciple of Divine Wrath), hybrid, or pure avenger since they all satisfy the Oath of Enmity power requirement. This also breaks several constraints of the Oath of Enmity class feature.

Avenger Oath of Enmity feature: "When you make a melee attack against the target and the target is the only enemy adjacent to you, you make two attack rolls and use either result."

Hybrid Oath of Enmity feature: As above, but "you can apply the effect only when you make a melee attack using an avenger power or an avenger paragon path power."

Distant Vengeance benefit: As long as you are within 10 squares of your oath of enmity target and no other enemies are adjacent to you, you gain the benefit of your oath of enmity on all ranged basic attacks against your oath of enmity target.

HoF/DoDW OR Pure/Hybrid Avenger: double roll limited to melee attack (MC/Pure/Hybrid) while target is only enemy adjacent (MC/Pure/Hybrid) and using an avenger or avenger PP power (Hybrid only)
WITH Distant Vengeance: PLUS all ranged basic attacks within 10 squares of your OoE target and no other enemies are adjacent to you

HoF/DoDW OR Pure/Hybrid Avenger: double roll limited to melee attack (MC/Pure/Hybrid) while target is only enemy adjacent (MC/Pure/Hybrid) and using an avenger or avenger PP power (Hybrid only)
WITH Distant Vengeance: PLUS all ranged basic attacks within 10 squares of your OoE target and no other enemies are adjacent to you

Hybrid Avenger: double roll limited to melee attack (MC/Pure/Hybrid) while target is only enemy adjacent (MC/Pure/Hybrid) and using an avenger or avenger PP power (Hybrid only)
WITH Distant Vengeance: PLUS all ranged basic attacks within 10 squares of your OoE target and no other enemies are adjacent to you 

The point with the above comparison, is unlike Darkhunter (which has no specific exception trumping the Hybrid Ranger extra damage constraint (only ranger and ranger PP powers), Distant Vengeance grants the "make two attack rolls" benefit of Oath of Enmity to ALL ranged basic attacks (RAW) in addition to melee attacks (by MC/Pure/Hybrid avenger) using an avenger or avenger PP power (Hybrid avenger).  Oath of Enmity (Hybrid) is a core Hybrid Avenger class feature (not a Hybrid Talent feat option).  As a core class feature, it gains all the rules breaking exceptions granted from other games elements (such as the DV feat) as a pure avenger would get.  

The Distant Vengeance feat applies the "benefit of your oath of enmity" (Not restrictions! If it was referring to restrictions neither the pure avenger OoE nor hybrid avenger OoE would work with DV!) to "all ranged basic attacks" against your OoE target.  The "benefit" of your Oath of Enmity, whether you are pure or hybrid avenger is "you make two attack rolls and use either result."

"All" expands the class and hybrid avenger class feature the same way.  If the pure avenger gets an exception to be able to use "all ranged basic attacks" in addition to melee attacks (with single adjacent enemy caveat) the hybrid avenger gets the exact same benefit, which specifically trumps both the melee attack and avenger/avenger PP power restriction.

Having said this, make sure to "ask your DM first" since there is a difference of opinion/interpretation on these boards.
okay, here's what's weird. i was searching for an analogous example (you used the word "corollary" - i don't think that's what you meant), and i also came up with Darkhunter. and i got half way through writing something very similar to what you wrote, then erased it all 'cause i thought maybe nobody would actually want to read it except me. obviously, i was wrong.

in any case, i completely agree with your interpretation. AND you've done a better job of making the case than i did, so thanks very much for taking the time to do that. you've illustrated why the general/specific ruling can reasonably applied, when previously i didn't have a compelling way to do that.
okay, here's what's weird. i was searching for an analogous example (you used the word "corollary" - i don't think that's what you meant)

Thanks, updated verbiage to "analogous."

, and i also came up with Darkhunter. and i got half way through writing something very similar to what you wrote, then erased it all 'cause i thought maybe nobody would actually want to read it except me. obviously, i was wrong.

in any case, i completely agree with your interpretation. AND you've done a better job of making the case than i did, so thanks very much for taking the time to do that. you've illustrated why the general/specific ruling can reasonably applied, when previously i didn't have a compelling way to do that.

In any case, if you have an interesting character concept (you do!) don't let ambiguous rules hold you back from posting (I know I have).  You should be able to get good feedback/critiques regardless of different RAW interpretations.
thanks for the encouragement, Dzance - will do. and thanks again for the well-constructed argument.
Avenger Oath of Enmity feature: "When you make a melee attack against the target and the target is the only enemy adjacent to you, you make two attack rolls and use either result."

Hybrid Oath of Enmity feature: As above, but "you can apply the effect only when you make a melee attack using an avenger power or an avenger paragon path power."

Distant Vengeance benefit: As long as you are within 10 squares of your oath of enmity target and no other enemies are adjacent to you, you gain the benefit of your oath of enmity on all ranged basic attacks against your oath of enmity target.

HoF/DoDW OR Pure/Hybrid Avenger: double roll limited to melee attack (MC/Pure/Hybrid) while target is only enemy adjacent (MC/Pure/Hybrid) and using an avenger or avenger PP power (Hybrid only)
WITH Distant Vengeance: PLUS all ranged basic attacks within 10 squares of your OoE target and no other enemies are adjacent to you

HoF/DoDW OR Pure/Hybrid Avenger: double roll limited to melee attack (MC/Pure/Hybrid) while target is only enemy adjacent (MC/Pure/Hybrid) and using an avenger or avenger PP power (Hybrid only)
WITH Distant Vengeance: PLUS all ranged basic attacks within 10 squares of your OoE target and no other enemies are adjacent to you

Hybrid Avenger: double roll limited to melee attack (MC/Pure/Hybrid) while target is only enemy adjacent (MC/Pure/Hybrid) and using an avenger or avenger PP power (Hybrid only)
WITH Distant Vengeance: PLUS all ranged basic attacks within 10 squares of your OoE target and no other enemies are adjacent to you 

The point with the above comparison, is unlike Darkhunter (which has no specific exception trumping the Hybrid Ranger extra damage constraint (only ranger and ranger PP powers), Distant Vengeance grants the "make two attack rolls" benefit of Oath of Enmity to ALL ranged basic attacks (RAW) in addition to melee attacks (by MC/Pure/Hybrid avenger) using an avenger or avenger PP power (Hybrid avenger).  Oath of Enmity (Hybrid) is a core Hybrid Avenger class feature (not a Hybrid Talent feat option).  As a core class feature, it gains all the rules breaking exceptions granted from other games elements (such as the DV feat) as a pure avenger would get.  

The Distant Vengeance feat applies the "benefit of your oath of enmity" (Not restrictions! If it was referring to restrictions neither the pure avenger OoE nor hybrid avenger OoE would work with DV!) to "all ranged basic attacks" against your OoE target.  The "benefit" of your Oath of Enmity, whether you are pure or hybrid avenger is "you make two attack rolls and use either result."



Except 4e is a set of general rules and specific exceptions. And when you have two specific exceptions, you don't get to pick which one overrules the other when there is a reading that allows both of them to function(even if that benefit is effectively zero)

i.e. you gain the benefit of oath of enmity with RBAs as long as they are a melee Avenger power..

If a feat allowed one to use Impaling Spear with not just MBAs, but RBAs as well, you still need to use a spear to use that second feat. Same thing goes for hybrid oath of enmity.
well... that is what i was afraid of; there is certainly an argument for each direction.

so i *think* Mommy is arguing that the Distant Vengeance has exactly zero benefit for a hybrid Avenger.

i.e. (Normal OoE) restricted by ((hybrid) intersected with (DV)) = 0

but if you do ( ( (Normal OoE) modified by (hybrid) )  modified by DV ) then it does work.

similarly, if you consider the BASE power to be Hybrid OoE, then it also seems to work since you're just applying an exception to THAT.

from a purely logical perspective, i don't think there is a clear answer.
Except 4e is a set of general rules and specific exceptions. And when you have two specific exceptions, you don't get to pick which one overrules the other when there is a reading that allows both of them to function(even if that benefit is effectively zero)

i.e. you gain the benefit of oath of enmity with RBAs as long as they are a melee Avenger power..

If a feat allowed one to use Impaling Spear with not just MBAs, but RBAs as well, you still need to use a spear to use that second feat. Same thing goes for hybrid oath of enmity.

In context of Rules Compendium verbiage (its back cover states "All the Rules in One Book"), it sounds like any rules element NOT found inside the Rules Compendium is a specific element that modifies/creates exceptions to the General Rules (all found in RC). It goes as far to cite elf longbow proficiency as an example of a specific exception to the rules (p29).

RC further states, "Powers, class features, racial traits, feats, magic items, monster abilities, and other game statistics usually include some element that breaks the general rules in some way. The element creates an exception to how the rest of the game works. Remember this: If a specific rule contradicts a general rule, the specific rule wins... Powers often create major exceptions to the rules."

In such context, Oath of Enmity and most/all other class features are specific elements that break the general rules.  This would definitely include a pure or hybrid avenger's OoE class feature/power, which (among other things) creates an exception to "Making Attacks" #3 (RC, p214), allowing two rolls of a single d20 instead of 1 (with restrictions on when it occurs).  A pure or hybrid avenger's Oath of Enmity class feature/power and likely all other class features should be considered "specific exceptions" to the general rules, based on RC context.

However, the Rules Compendium is silent on the question of when you have conflicting specific exceptions, other than the general principle "Specific Beats General."  It does seem like "Specific Beats General" principle should include gradated specificity rather than be binary, to avoid unintended logical intersections.

For example, if you consider Oath of Enmity to be a specific exception that lets you roll twice when making a melee attack against an adjacent OoE target while not adjacent to any other enemy, and Distant Vengeance feat to be another specific exception that lets you gain this OoE roll-twice benefit when using an RBA against an OoE target within 10 while you're not adjacent to another enemy, the logical intersection of these two specific exceptions (pure avenger OoE + DV) would require a Shadar-kai with Reaper's Touch using an MBA/RBA against an adjacent OoE target.  Which definitely isn't RAI.

So another factor to consider is whether a base hybrid (or pure) class feature is a more general rule, or a specific exception on equal footing with feats. To keep sanity, I consider any class feature (hybrid or pure class (e.g. OoE)) as a more general rule element than feats that would modify such. This seems to keep to the spirit of "Specific Beats General" principle, and avoids less sensical interpretations (imo).  Further, I consider class features obtained by base/hybrid/multiclass to be equivalent in their specificity, only differing in restrictions to usage.  If other specific exceptions (e.g. Darkhunter, Distant Vengeance examples above) break rules that modify when or how they apply, they are all affected equally.

So another factor to consider is whether a base hybrid (or pure) class feature is a more general rule or a specific exception on equal footing with feats. To keep sanity, I consider any class feature (hybrid or pure class (e.g. OoE)) as a more general rule element than feats that would modify such. This seems to keep to the spirit of "Specific Beats General" principle, and avoids less sensical interpretations (imo).  Further, I consider class features obtained by base/hybrid/multiclass to be equivalent in their specificity, only differing in restrictions to usage.  If other specific exceptions (e.g. Darkhunter, Distant Vengeance examples above) break rules that modify when or how they apply, they are all affected equally.

The Darkhunter example isn't really relevant because, as you said in that (much longer than necessary) post, "The only constraint that Darkhunter doesn't explicitly override is the Hybrid Ranger class feature constraint." So Darkhunter and Hybrid Ranger do not actually contradict each other, making it easy to adjudicate.

You can't say that the hybrid class feature is more general, because the definitions of "specific" and "general" here tend to refer to "which rules do they modify." Here's what I mean:

Tier 1 (most general): the normal attack rules.
Tier 2 (more specific): OoE, because it directly modifies those attack rules.
Tier 3 (most specific): Hybrid OoE, because it directly modifies OoE's usage restrictions, AND DV, because it directly modifies OoE's usage restrictions

DV modifies OoE, it does not modify the hybrid version.

A good counterargument could be made that DV does *not* modify OoE, and it's actually a completely separate effect that just makes use of your OoE target. In that case, the hybrid restrictions are totally irrelevant, because DV is its own thing. That wasn't your argument though...
A good counterargument could be made that DV does *not* modify OoE, and it's actually a completely separate effect that just makes use of your OoE target. In that case, the hybrid restrictions are totally irrelevant, because DV is its own thing. That wasn't your argument though...



that's the point i was trying to illustrate when i compared this:

(Normal OoE) restricted by ((hybrid) intersected with (DV)) = 0



with this:

( ( (Normal OoE) modified by (hybrid) )  modified by DV )

For example, if you consider Oath of Enmity to be a specific exception that lets you roll twice when making a melee attack against an adjacent OoE target while not adjacent to any other enemy, and Distant Vengeance feat to be another specific exception that lets you gain this OoE roll-twice benefit when using an RBA against an OoE target within 10 while you're not adjacent to another enemy, the logical intersection of these two specific exceptions (pure avenger OoE + DV) would require a Shadar-kai with Reaper's Touch using an MBA/RBA against an adjacent OoE target.  Which definitely isn't RAI.



Both Distant Vengeance and Hybrid OoE are specific exceptions to how OoE generally works. There is no way of deciding which specific exception is more important within RAW except by using interpretation. And as long as we're using interpretation, we might as well decide that hybrids should use Avenging Shackles and that's it.
@Mommy... sarcasm aside... i agree that it's a completely reasonable argument that there's no way to no which is "more important" or "comes first in the chain of specificity" or whatever nomenclature works. (for the record, i can see how one would reason a certain order, but i don't think that argument is conclusive).

after this discussion (which i very much appreciate, by the way), my opinion is that it does require a DM ruling (as opposed to making the argument that it certainly works or it certainly doesn't). i.e., i can still see reasonable arguments for both cases.
The logical reading (to me, anyway) is that Distant Vengeance allows you to replace the "melee attack" part of Hybrid OoE with "ranged basic attack" without changing anything else (which pretty much limits you to Avenging Shackles unless there's some other avenger/avenger PP power that is/can be made to count as an RBA, but still...), but logic and the rules don't always mesh very well, especially where hybrids are involved.
ok, but i think we've already covered that. i think it's as reasonable to argue that we're replacing "melee attack using an avenger power" with "all ranged basic attacks." i'm not saying that's more right, i'm saying it's just as logical.
Tier 2 (more specific): OoE, because it directly modifies those attack rules.

I would probably amend this to be "Tier 2 (more specific): a rules element granting OoE, because it directly modifies those attack rules." This gives you specific flavor of OoE from the get-go, depending on whether acquired by pure avenger class feature, hybrid avenger class feature, or multi-class feat.  Tier 3 would then not include hybrid OoE.

DV modifies OoE, it does not modify the hybrid version.

It depends.  It specifies "your Oath of Enmity."  I consider "your Oath of Enmity" as a multiclass avenger to be different than "your Oath of Enmity" as a hybrid avenger, to be different than "your Oath of Enmity" as a pure avenger.  In this case "your" refers to a variable base class feature.

A good counterargument could be made that DV does *not* modify OoE, and it's actually a completely separate effect that just makes use of your OoE target. In that case, the hybrid restrictions are totally irrelevant, because DV is its own thing. That wasn't your argument though...

Good suggestion/counter argument. This may actually be the case, based on the DV feat verbiage.

Both Distant Vengeance and Hybrid OoE are specific exceptions to how OoE generally works. There is no way of deciding which specific exception is more important within RAW except by using interpretation.

I consider the rule element that grants you OoE as the determinant to how "your OoE" works.  This is your base feature, and any other game element is a specific exception that modifies this base feature.

In any case, sounds like this remains in the realm of DM's prerogative.
PHB3 pg 136: "...a hybrid character recives a modified version of a class feature.  Such a class feature counts as the full-fledged feature for the purpose of meeting prerequisites and applying various game options."

That statement leads me to believe that the feat would override even the hybrid avenger limitation for OoE.  It states that you apply the feat (a game option) to the class feature as though it was the full-fledged feature.  It is a specific modification as to what powers it can apply to.

Regular OoE: a melee attack
Hybrid OoE: an avenger or avenger PP melee attack
Regular OoE + DV: a melee attack or all RBA you make
Hybrid OoE + DV: an avenger or avenger PP melee attack or all RBA you make

The hybrid avenger portion states that the power "functions as normal, except you can apply the effect only when you make a melee attack using an avenger power or an avenger paragon path power."  So the limits are on what melee attacks trigger it.  The feat adds all ranged basic attacks.  You cannot satisfy the feat by limiting it to only avenger/avenger PP powers.  If it said any ranged basic attack, yes that would satisfy it.  Except that the feat says ALL ranged basic attacks. 
PHB3 pg 136: "...a hybrid character recives a modified version of a class feature.  Such a class feature counts as the full-fledged feature for the purpose of meeting prerequisites and applying various game options."

This is probably the best rules support that I've seen to indicate that Hybrid OoE + DV (and similar feat/hybrid class feature interactions) was not intended to equal zero. "All" means "all," for both the avenger and hybrid avenger OoE class feature. Thanks for sharing!
Again, this argument has happened many times before and never been resolved, because both sides have valid points of view, and there IS NOT A CLEAR RAW ANSWER.

Can we please not rehash the discussion yet again?
Harrying your Prey, the Easy Way: A Hunter's Handbook - the first of what will hopefully be many CharOp efforts on my part. The Blinker - teleport everywhere. An Eladrin Knight/Eldritch Knight. CB != rules source.
PHB3 pg 136: "...a hybrid character recives a modified version of a class feature.  Such a class feature counts as the full-fledged feature for the purpose of meeting prerequisites and applying various game options."



Also known as a general rule. Now only if there was something in 4e about overriding general rules. Say specific clauses in the class feature that it doesn't function when X happens.
PHB3 pg 136: "...a hybrid character recives a modified version of a class feature.  Such a class feature counts as the full-fledged feature for the purpose of meeting prerequisites and applying various game options."



Also known as a general rule. Now only if there was something in 4e about overriding general rules. Say specific clauses in the class feature that it doesn't function when X happens.



Or specific clauses in feats that modify what the class feature can be used on or used with.