"Fix" Feats & Houserules?

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I'm trying to compile a list of all the "Fix" feats to possibly allow as Houserules in an upcoming Campaign. There may also be some others like those that've been mentioned in another thread here (racial prereqs removed from themes, maybe a few extra ability points, etc) Off the top of my head: Improved Defenses Expertise Focus Epic NADs (?) Anybody have anymore, or interesting Houserules to add?


**EDIT**

Forgot to add Toughness as well- maybe 1/Tier for low HP Casters? What about the Initiative line of feats?
RIP George! 4-21-11 RIP Abie! 1-2-13
Funny Forum Quotes
[quote author=82733368 post=532127449]
58115148 wrote:
"You notice a large piece of mold clinging to your toothbrush. What do you do?" "I cast Fireball." "I run like hell!
63797881 wrote:
The standard d4 is somewhat (SOMEWHAT) rounded on the top, the older models are even flat. The Lego is shaped in such a way that in an emergency, you can use one as a makeshift surgical knife.
147742801 wrote:
57457938 wrote:
My wife asked me if her pants made her look fat. What do you think I said?
Wife: Do these pants make me look fat? RedSiegfried: I just killed a bunch of orc women and children.
63797881 wrote:
82733368 wrote:
28.) Making a "Drunken Master" style character (Monk or otherwise) does not require my character to be completely shitfaced, no matter what the name (and fun interpretation) implies.
29.) Making a "Drunken Master" style character does not require ME to be completely tanked, no matter how "in-character" I want to be..
Initiative isn't a fix, it's more of a "why wouldn't you take it?"-type of deal.

I usually hand out a stupid number of extra feats over the course of 1-30 because I don't want to tell my players "you would take this anyway" but rather "now you can take this and that other thing".
I really only consider ID and Expertise to be appropriate for freebies. Maybe also Melee Training because rogues/avengers/battleminds/etc. not having a decent native MBA is just dumb.
What's your goal here? I generally only do house rules to speak to a specific theme for the campaign.

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
DMs: Don't Prep the Plot | Structure First, Story Last | Prep Tips | Spoilers Don't Spoil Anything | No Myth Roleplaying
Players: 11 Ways to Be a Better Roleplayer | You Are Not Your Character     Hilarious D&D Actual Play Podcast: Crit Juice!

FREE CONTENT: Encounters With Alternate Goals | Full-Contact Futbol  |  Pre-Gen D&D 5e PCs | Re-Imagining Phandelver | Three Pillars of Immersion | Seahorse Run

Follow me on Twitter: @is3rith

What's your goal here? I generally only do house rules to speak to a specific theme for the campaign.



Just to unburden some feat-taxed PCs and make things a little easier all-around.

@ Scatter: I didn't even think of Melee Training, must've skipped my mind, thanks!

**EDIT** Anyone have any interesting Houserule(s) in their Campaigns?
RIP George! 4-21-11 RIP Abie! 1-2-13
Funny Forum Quotes
[quote author=82733368 post=532127449]
58115148 wrote:
"You notice a large piece of mold clinging to your toothbrush. What do you do?" "I cast Fireball." "I run like hell!
63797881 wrote:
The standard d4 is somewhat (SOMEWHAT) rounded on the top, the older models are even flat. The Lego is shaped in such a way that in an emergency, you can use one as a makeshift surgical knife.
147742801 wrote:
57457938 wrote:
My wife asked me if her pants made her look fat. What do you think I said?
Wife: Do these pants make me look fat? RedSiegfried: I just killed a bunch of orc women and children.
63797881 wrote:
82733368 wrote:
28.) Making a "Drunken Master" style character (Monk or otherwise) does not require my character to be completely shitfaced, no matter what the name (and fun interpretation) implies.
29.) Making a "Drunken Master" style character does not require ME to be completely tanked, no matter how "in-character" I want to be..
I apparently have the most controversial house rule ever (if these forums are to be believed):

Show
When your character would normally die according to game mechanics, you decide whether your character actually dies in the fiction or not. In any event, you are effectively “taken out” of the current scene though you may continue to participate in the creation of the fiction as normal. If you decide your character lives, tell us what happened, the cost her or she paid, and what grim knowledge he or she brought back from The Other Side. The choice will remain with the individual players as to when death “sticks” if it comes up. If you prefer to abide by the standard D&D rules with regard to this issue, you can do that, too – simply choose death when it comes around, every time. What others decide to do with their character in this regard does not affect you. Adventures I design are often described as challenging and I never fudge; it wouldn’t hurt to have a backup character if you feel like making the effort.

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
DMs: Don't Prep the Plot | Structure First, Story Last | Prep Tips | Spoilers Don't Spoil Anything | No Myth Roleplaying
Players: 11 Ways to Be a Better Roleplayer | You Are Not Your Character     Hilarious D&D Actual Play Podcast: Crit Juice!

FREE CONTENT: Encounters With Alternate Goals | Full-Contact Futbol  |  Pre-Gen D&D 5e PCs | Re-Imagining Phandelver | Three Pillars of Immersion | Seahorse Run

Follow me on Twitter: @is3rith

Anyone have any interesting Houserule(s) in their Campaigns?



I let my players use thier Action Point to re-roll an attack.  This way, if they use thier daily or encounter power and it misses, instead of taking an Action Point to use a different attack, the have another chance at thier daily.  My players love it.  I actually stole this from a DM in a game I played in though, so am not taking credit for it.

Versatile Expertise as a free feat
@ iserith & lathais: I will be using both suggestions- thanks!
RIP George! 4-21-11 RIP Abie! 1-2-13
Funny Forum Quotes
[quote author=82733368 post=532127449]
58115148 wrote:
"You notice a large piece of mold clinging to your toothbrush. What do you do?" "I cast Fireball." "I run like hell!
63797881 wrote:
The standard d4 is somewhat (SOMEWHAT) rounded on the top, the older models are even flat. The Lego is shaped in such a way that in an emergency, you can use one as a makeshift surgical knife.
147742801 wrote:
57457938 wrote:
My wife asked me if her pants made her look fat. What do you think I said?
Wife: Do these pants make me look fat? RedSiegfried: I just killed a bunch of orc women and children.
63797881 wrote:
82733368 wrote:
28.) Making a "Drunken Master" style character (Monk or otherwise) does not require my character to be completely shitfaced, no matter what the name (and fun interpretation) implies.
29.) Making a "Drunken Master" style character does not require ME to be completely tanked, no matter how "in-character" I want to be..
I've never actually noticed any difference between a game in which the PCs were given the "feat tax" feats for free and one where that wasn't the case. What are the benefits of doing this? Remove opportunity cost so players take "other" feats? I've never felt the need to take Expertise feats either if my character concept didn't call for it. I know it's a math fix, but in my experience it's much ado about nothing in actual play.

Another house rule: DM never pours his own drinks. 

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
DMs: Don't Prep the Plot | Structure First, Story Last | Prep Tips | Spoilers Don't Spoil Anything | No Myth Roleplaying
Players: 11 Ways to Be a Better Roleplayer | You Are Not Your Character     Hilarious D&D Actual Play Podcast: Crit Juice!

FREE CONTENT: Encounters With Alternate Goals | Full-Contact Futbol  |  Pre-Gen D&D 5e PCs | Re-Imagining Phandelver | Three Pillars of Immersion | Seahorse Run

Follow me on Twitter: @is3rith

We started giving an expertise feat for free a while ago in our games and it really doesn't change much.  Just means the damage and accuracy are improved at level 1 instead of one or the other.  Usually the player will take focus with the level one feat after getting expertise for free.  We started giving improved defenses this last campaign and really not seeing a big difference.
We also make forced movement cause opportunity attacks.  Only if the creature goes from a square adjacent to you to a square no longer adjacent to you though.  Makes forced movement stronger, but really hasn't been overpowering.  Enemies can use forced movement the same way against the party.
I find all the fixes ridiculous, especially given what I hear about epic combat being easy even after the supposed monster fixes. It's clear to me that relying on the rules themselves to counteract the vagaries of players, DMs and dice is a lost battle.

I don't give out anything for free. If players aren't having fun with their characters or with combat, I'll work with them. Making failure interesting obviates much of the supposed need to "fix" anything else.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

IMO, some of the fixes do more to "balance" PCs with one another than they do to "balance" the game or make it more/less difficult. 
I've never actually noticed any difference between a game in which the PCs were given the "feat tax" feats for free and one where that wasn't the case. What are the benefits of doing this? Remove opportunity cost so players take "other" feats? I've never felt the need to take Expertise feats either if my character concept didn't call for it. I know it's a math fix, but in my experience it's much ado about nothing in actual play.

Another house rule: DM never pours his own drinks. 

I do free expertise feats because my group is a mixed bag of players who really enjoy the combat hack and slash style and players who really want to develop their concept of a character and have some cool non-combat related things to add on.  One of my players has a hafling druid who is just plain not as strong as some of the other characters, so giving him a free combat bonus lets him select feats he likes the flavor of without feeling as though he's falling behind mechanically. 
I plan on doing the Houserules mainly because I have a diverse group- CharOP'ers, and "flavor-OP'ers" who tend to use slightly weaker builds where this would be a simple fix and free up feat space for stuff they want.
RIP George! 4-21-11 RIP Abie! 1-2-13
Funny Forum Quotes
[quote author=82733368 post=532127449]
58115148 wrote:
"You notice a large piece of mold clinging to your toothbrush. What do you do?" "I cast Fireball." "I run like hell!
63797881 wrote:
The standard d4 is somewhat (SOMEWHAT) rounded on the top, the older models are even flat. The Lego is shaped in such a way that in an emergency, you can use one as a makeshift surgical knife.
147742801 wrote:
57457938 wrote:
My wife asked me if her pants made her look fat. What do you think I said?
Wife: Do these pants make me look fat? RedSiegfried: I just killed a bunch of orc women and children.
63797881 wrote:
82733368 wrote:
28.) Making a "Drunken Master" style character (Monk or otherwise) does not require my character to be completely shitfaced, no matter what the name (and fun interpretation) implies.
29.) Making a "Drunken Master" style character does not require ME to be completely tanked, no matter how "in-character" I want to be..
I guess it matters what style of game you run. If you're mostly using the default dramatic question for encounters, perhaps these house rules would make a noticeable difference. In an approach like ours, you can have super-optimized characters and non-optimized characters in the same party and everyone contribues equally.

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
DMs: Don't Prep the Plot | Structure First, Story Last | Prep Tips | Spoilers Don't Spoil Anything | No Myth Roleplaying
Players: 11 Ways to Be a Better Roleplayer | You Are Not Your Character     Hilarious D&D Actual Play Podcast: Crit Juice!

FREE CONTENT: Encounters With Alternate Goals | Full-Contact Futbol  |  Pre-Gen D&D 5e PCs | Re-Imagining Phandelver | Three Pillars of Immersion | Seahorse Run

Follow me on Twitter: @is3rith

Another house rule: DM never pours his own drinks. 



My live group adopted a similar rule all on thier own apparently.  One of the guys was going to order pizza for everyone and they were deciding what type of pizzas to order.  He said DM gets first choice on one pizza, then they would vote on the other 2.  I told them I'd eat whatever, but what my favortie was as well.  That ended up being what they got though, so apparently, DM gets to pick the food is a houserule now too.

I house rule crit strike. 150% max dmg, target is unconscious unless make save. Makes save stunned 1-4 rounds. This one change changed entire feel of combat. My players think twice before starting a fightevt, and each roll of 20 adds excitement.
Was your intended goal with that house rule to make the players think twice before going into a fight?

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
DMs: Don't Prep the Plot | Structure First, Story Last | Prep Tips | Spoilers Don't Spoil Anything | No Myth Roleplaying
Players: 11 Ways to Be a Better Roleplayer | You Are Not Your Character     Hilarious D&D Actual Play Podcast: Crit Juice!

FREE CONTENT: Encounters With Alternate Goals | Full-Contact Futbol  |  Pre-Gen D&D 5e PCs | Re-Imagining Phandelver | Three Pillars of Immersion | Seahorse Run

Follow me on Twitter: @is3rith

Nope. Key was to add unpredictable random excitement. Rolling a 20 is big thing. Max dmg as its only result was...extreme anti-climatic, especially for paragon lvl pc's and equally highly monsters, sitting on X number of health. The result has been tense, emotional roller coaster ride encounter, and our players dont start a fight unless necessary with anyone, including farmers, especially against high numbers. One roll of 20 and no save = fights over. It goes both ways. Pcs pull off lucky rolls and what was losing fight becomes win fight... it just adds crazy excitement so we been using it. Small yet Chance of 1 shot lethal blow, changes entire feel of combat for us.

Now the mechanic agrees with bbeg decisions to use underlings to do dirty work,  regardless of how powerful they are... and not unneccsarily risk themselves.  Otherwise it just becomes predictable math..you X level then you are untouchable by Y levels no matter how many of them, and we all know players exploit this simple math as well.

With this crit houserule... combat against anyone feels like combat...risk, no matter how small, of sudden incapacitation.

Its works for us. 
I see. It just sounded like you might be tired of the players attacking your NPCs, farmers or otherwise.

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
DMs: Don't Prep the Plot | Structure First, Story Last | Prep Tips | Spoilers Don't Spoil Anything | No Myth Roleplaying
Players: 11 Ways to Be a Better Roleplayer | You Are Not Your Character     Hilarious D&D Actual Play Podcast: Crit Juice!

FREE CONTENT: Encounters With Alternate Goals | Full-Contact Futbol  |  Pre-Gen D&D 5e PCs | Re-Imagining Phandelver | Three Pillars of Immersion | Seahorse Run

Follow me on Twitter: @is3rith

We also use lowest roll as fumble. Attacker is stunned 1-4 rounds, save ends. But...like I mentioned on older posts we use 2d10 instead of 1d20, to keep probability in the middle, and roll of 20 or 2 only becomes 1% chance, instead of 5%, which is too high since probability favors numbers which means favors monsters instead of pc. Yeah, we houseruled one thing that matters most to us...fast, furious, exciting combats.
I guess it matters what style of game you run. If you're mostly using the default dramatic question for encounters, perhaps these house rules would make a noticeable difference. In an approach like ours, you can have super-optimized characters and non-optimized characters in the same party and everyone contribues equally.

I see that, and I make use of alternate goals in combat a lot of the time.  I am wondering, though, are your non-OP players always relegated to doing something other than combat in your encounters?  I don't have a frame of reference for this, as I'm only running 1 campaign.
I see that, and I make use of alternate goals in combat a lot of the time.  I am wondering, though, are your non-OP players always relegated to doing something other than combat in your encounters?  I don't have a frame of reference for this, as I'm only running 1 campaign.



No, I haven't seen them relegated to anything they didn't necessarily want to do. The monsters/NPCs do what their goals, motivations, and impulses tell them to do. How the PCs set about stopping them is up to the players' goals, motivations, and impulses. Optimization, in my view, is actually a very narrow aspect of the game even if those practicing it is common. It's almost entirely about one side killing the other side. That's just one way to resolve a problem in D&D.

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
DMs: Don't Prep the Plot | Structure First, Story Last | Prep Tips | Spoilers Don't Spoil Anything | No Myth Roleplaying
Players: 11 Ways to Be a Better Roleplayer | You Are Not Your Character     Hilarious D&D Actual Play Podcast: Crit Juice!

FREE CONTENT: Encounters With Alternate Goals | Full-Contact Futbol  |  Pre-Gen D&D 5e PCs | Re-Imagining Phandelver | Three Pillars of Immersion | Seahorse Run

Follow me on Twitter: @is3rith

@iserith, I'm glad to hear that. i wasworried that my player would think something along the line of, well, I probably can't hit him so I guess I'll roll arcana again to disrupt the ritual circle -- to give a really bad example.

edit: for dyac 
I see that, and I make use of alternate goals in combat a lot of the time.  I am wondering, though, are your non-OP players always relegated to doing something other than combat in your encounters?  I don't have a frame of reference for this, as I'm only running 1 campaign.

No, for a few reasons. For one thing, the players helped come up with the alternate goals, so they have some interest in working on them. For another, the monsters have reason to focus on those PCs who are trying to accomplish a goal or prevent the monsters from accomplishing theirs. Finally, because the enemy doesn't necessarily win by killing the PCs, I can throw caution to the wind with my monster choices and play to the high end of the party's ability.

This is probably better off in another thread.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

My houserules that apply to D&D 4E:


  •  Improvisation = auto-success, complications depending on die roll


    • 20 = extraordinary success, added bonus effect

    • success = no complications

    • fail by less than 5 = small complications

    • fail by 5 or more = significant complications

    • 1 = extraordinary failure


  • PC Death = either continue as a ghost, or count as defeat instead.

  • Escalation Die (from 13th Age): "Starting round 2 by default, I will be bringing out a d6. Whatever the value of that d6 would be, that is the attack bonus all PCs will have for that round.  This usually starts off at 1, and increases each round until you reach 6; yes, that does mean that I grant up to +6 to hit for all PCs by round 7, or sooner given particular situations."

  • Uskglass' gridless, zone-based approach to combat (adapted from 13th Age), with options to include disengaging (but removing charging and combat advantage, having effects that trigger from combat advantage trigger instead when you have at least one ally engaged with your target and lowering monster defenses by 2 as well).

  • Second Wind and Total Defense are one and the same.  In addition, whenever you use Second Wind/Total Defense after the first time you spend a healing surge, you must roll a saving throw. If you pass, you can spend a healing surge again.


The Escalation Die rule combined with the lowering of monster defenses by 2 removes the need for Expertise feats or the bonuses to hit with charging and combat advantage, and encourages players to reserve their novas for later rounds.
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This is what I believe is the spirit of D&D 4E, and my deal breaker for D&D Next: equal opportunities, with distinct specializations, in areas where conflict happens the most often, without having to worry about heavy micromanagement or system mastery. What I hope to be my most useful contributions to the D&D Community: DM Idea: Collaborative Mapping, Classless 4E (homebrew system, that hopefully helps in D&D Next development), Gamma World 7E random character generator (by yours truly), and the Concept of Perfect Imbalance (for D&D Next and other TRPGs in development) Pre-3E D&D should be recognized for what they were: simulation wargames where people could tell stories with The Best Answer to "Why 4E?" Fun vs. Engaging
I apparently have the most controversial house rule ever (if these forums are to be believed):


Show
When your character would normally die according to game mechanics, you decide whether your character actually dies in the fiction or not. In any event, you are effectively “taken out” of the current scene though you may continue to participate in the creation of the fiction as normal. If you decide your character lives, tell us what happened, the cost her or she paid, and what grim knowledge he or she brought back from The Other Side. The choice will remain with the individual players as to when death “sticks” if it comes up. If you prefer to abide by the standard D&D rules with regard to this issue, you can do that, too – simply choose death when it comes around, every time. What others decide to do with their character in this regard does not affect you. Adventures I design are often described as challenging and I never fudge; it wouldn’t hurt to have a backup character if you feel like making the effort.


FYI this is the best house rule I ever implimented in any game regardless of the system.


With the exception of Paranoia. Anyone have any thoughts about how this would go over? I haven't run a game since bringing this into play, but I'd be curious how it goes. 

"In a way, you are worse than Krusk"                               " As usual, Krusk comments with assuredness, but lacks the clarity and awareness of what he's talking about"

"Can't say enough how much I agree with Krusk"        "Wow, thank you very much"

"Your advice is the worst"

FYI this is the best house rule I ever implimented in any game regardless of the system.

With the exception of Paranoia. Anyone have any thoughts about how this would go over? I haven't run a game since bringing this into play, but I'd be curious how it goes.


Well, since my understanding of Paranoia is that is is tailored primarily to the "players get their characters as redshirts to die in hilarious ways" crowd instead of the "players use their characters as heroes to succeed/fail in epic ways," then I imagine that such a rule would be less necessary ;) As long as the player agrees with how much control he has over the details of the death scenes, it's already good because the players should already happy. If the GM doesn't do that, then he should be set on fire for committing the treason of making his players unhappy, and then they should stab each other for the treason of burning the guy who made them unhappy instead of shooting themselves for being unhappy and then shooting him 

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Which is why a DM should present problems to solve, not solutions to find. -FlatFoot
Why there should be the option to use alignment systems:
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If some people are heavily benefiting from the inclusion of alignment, then it would behoove those that AREN'T to listen up and pay attention to how those benefits are being created and enjoyed, no? -YagamiFire
But equally important would be for those who do enjoy those benefits to entertain the possibility that other people do not value those benefits equally or, possibly, do not see them as benefits in the first place. -wrecan (RIP)
That makes sense. However, it is not fair to continually attack those that benefit for being, somehow, deviant for deriving enjoyment from something that you cannot. Instead, alignment is continually attacked...it is demonized...and those that use it are lumped in with it.

 

I think there is more merit in a situation where someone says "This doesn't work! It's broken!" and the reply is "Actually it works fine for me. Have you considered your approach might be causing it?"

 

than a situation where someone says "I use this system and the way I use it works really well!" and the back and forth is "No! It is a broken bad system!" -YagamiFire

My only houserule: When you stand up from prone you can also shift 1 square as a free action. You get to do it freely if someone is standing on your square, so it is silly if you can't when no-one is standing on the square. It helps both sides of the table and makes the "stand up" action significantly less lame.
House rule 1: Potions only take a minor action to use from stowed to drunk and you don't need to have a hand free. Otherwise you would need to free (drop weapon), minor (draw potion), minor (drink potion), minor (pick up weapon), which would make potions practically useless.

House rule 2: Any movement power/effect that would apply to you, you can give to your mount instead. This allows mounted combat to be significantly more workable.

House rule 3: +1/2 level to damage on all ranger beastmaster powers, including the beast's MBA. 
Back to Basics - A Guide to Basic Attacks You might be playing DnD wrong if... "Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former." Albert Einstein
My most obscene house rule was this:

-Combat Advantage  no longer gives a +2 to the attack roll.
-However, every effect on the target that would grant combat advantage allows the attacker an extra d20 to roll for the attack, keeping the best result.

Yes, this means that there have been instances where players were rolling five or even six d20's. (Surprisingly didn't see that many extra Crits)

Reasoning was that if a creature really did have all these conditions on it, it must be in such a bad position that hitting it should be trivial, and hitting a weak spot should be more likely.

My players loved it and it gave them a reason to want to stack CA granted effects, rather than feeling cheated when all those effects together did nothing but give a pitiful +2 to the attack.
House rule 1: Potions only take a minor action to use from stowed to drunk and you don't need to have a hand free. Otherwise you would need to free (drop weapon), minor (draw potion), minor (drink potion), minor (pick up weapon), which would make potions practically useless.

Wait... this wasn't the case already? We've been doing it this way since forever. Since potions give a static number of HP, at the cost of a healing surge, without using your healing surve value, we felt it was right and proper that consuming a postion as a minor action with lower HP return was perfectly balanced with the Second Wind as a standard action.
We never even thought of this as a house rule. O_o

House rule 2: Any movement power/effect that would apply to you, you can give to your mount instead. This allows mounted combat to be significantly more workable.

I'm assuming this is when the mount and rider aren't together, right? If the rider is mounted, it seems unnecessary. If the rider isn't mounted, well, okay. I'll have to look into this one next time I'm running a game with a mounted PC.

House rule 3: +1/2 level to damage on all ranger beastmaster powers, including the beast's MBA. 

Was this needed? I haven't played a BM Ranger or seen one played but shouldn't they already be doing enough damage? This feels like it could get unbalanced in higher levels compared to the rest of the party.
What brought you to make this house rule?

House rule 1: Potions only take a minor action to use from stowed to drunk and you don't need to have a hand free. Otherwise you would need to free (drop weapon), minor (draw potion), minor (drink potion), minor (pick up weapon), which would make potions practically useless.

Wait... this wasn't the case already? We've been doing it this way since forever. Since potions give a static number of HP, at the cost of a healing surge, without using your healing surve value, we felt it was right and proper that consuming a postion as a minor action with lower HP return was perfectly balanced with the Second Wind as a standard action.
We never even thought of this as a house rule. O_o

House rule 2: Any movement power/effect that would apply to you, you can give to your mount instead. This allows mounted combat to be significantly more workable.

I'm assuming this is when the mount and rider aren't together, right? If the rider is mounted, it seems unnecessary. If the rider isn't mounted, well, okay. I'll have to look into this one next time I'm running a game with a mounted PC.

House rule 3: +1/2 level to damage on all ranger beastmaster powers, including the beast's MBA. 

Was this needed? I haven't played a BM Ranger or seen one played but shouldn't they already be doing enough damage? This feels like it could get unbalanced in higher levels compared to the rest of the party.
What brought you to make this house rule?



1: Sadly not.  RAW, it's a minor action to draw a potion, and a minor to drink it (standard to feed it to someone else) and you have to have a hand free to do it.  Making 'use potion' a minor (or standard to use on someone else) is a VERY reasonable houserule.

2:There's a big discussion going on about this in CharOp at the moment.  Suffice it to say, it's not overpowered to allow people to let their mount use any movement they could use, if they are mounted on it at the time.  Teleportation being a bit of an exception, though not one that perticularly bothers me.

3: Ranger beasts have shocking damage compared to non-beasts (of the order of +6 to +10 at epic, when most people are at around +20 minimum, without significant optimisation, and the beast is more-or-less impossible to add damage to).  A wide range of houserules have been proposed to make the beast powers more viable; this one's OK.
Harrying your Prey, the Easy Way: A Hunter's Handbook - the first of what will hopefully be many CharOp efforts on my part. The Blinker - teleport everywhere. An Eladrin Knight/Eldritch Knight. CB != rules source.
That ^.
Back to Basics - A Guide to Basic Attacks You might be playing DnD wrong if... "Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former." Albert Einstein
My most obscene house rule was this:

-Combat Advantage  no longer gives a +2 to the attack roll.
-However, every effect on the target that would grant combat advantage allows the attacker an extra d20 to roll for the attack, keeping the best result.

Yes, this means that there have been instances where players were rolling five or even six d20's. (Surprisingly didn't see that many extra Crits)

Reasoning was that if a creature really did have all these conditions on it, it must be in such a bad position that hitting it should be trivial, and hitting a weak spot should be more likely.

My players loved it and it gave them a reason to want to stack CA granted effects, rather than feeling cheated when all those effects together did nothing but give a pitiful +2 to the attack.



You'll enjoy DNDN then...
Back to Basics - A Guide to Basic Attacks You might be playing DnD wrong if... "Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former." Albert Einstein
That ^.


Works for me.
Only one that I didn't already seem to have in mind was for the BM Rangers. I'll remember that one for whenever it should come up in any future game I run.

It seems the only official house rule at my table is DM buys all of the everything. Which is a little annoying, but since I like owning the stuff I don’t mind too much.

My most obscene house rule was this:

-Combat Advantage  no longer gives a +2 to the attack roll.
-However, every effect on the target that would grant combat advantage allows the attacker an extra d20 to roll for the attack, keeping the best result.

Yes, this means that there have been instances where players were rolling five or even six d20's. (Surprisingly didn't see that many extra Crits)

Reasoning was that if a creature really did have all these conditions on it, it must be in such a bad position that hitting it should be trivial, and hitting a weak spot should be more likely.

My players loved it and it gave them a reason to want to stack CA granted effects, rather than feeling cheated when all those effects together did nothing but give a pitiful +2 to the attack.



You'll enjoy DNDN then...



While I did lift this mechanic from Next, I'm not a fan of it or where it's going. In fact, that might be the only mechanic from it that I actually liked while the rest just.... didn't resonate with me.

If anything, I'm more excited over trying out 13th Age. It's the only other d20 game I think I could play after the clean, crisp design of 4e.

But please don't let me derail this thread on house rules and fixes.

Here's one we've been doing for a while:
-Initiative rolls are all done rolling a d10. (So as to actually make high initiative matter and not just lulck based) 
My most obscene house rule was this:

-Combat Advantage  no longer gives a +2 to the attack roll.
-However, every effect on the target that would grant combat advantage allows the attacker an extra d20 to roll for the attack, keeping the best result.

Yes, this means that there have been instances where players were rolling five or even six d20's. (Surprisingly didn't see that many extra Crits)

Reasoning was that if a creature really did have all these conditions on it, it must be in such a bad position that hitting it should be trivial, and hitting a weak spot should be more likely.

My players loved it and it gave them a reason to want to stack CA granted effects, rather than feeling cheated when all those effects together did nothing but give a pitiful +2 to the attack.



Very nice; don't know about the BM Ranger one, only because I doubt any of my people would use one, but otherwise I'll be implementing the other ideas.
RIP George! 4-21-11 RIP Abie! 1-2-13
Funny Forum Quotes
[quote author=82733368 post=532127449]
58115148 wrote:
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63797881 wrote:
The standard d4 is somewhat (SOMEWHAT) rounded on the top, the older models are even flat. The Lego is shaped in such a way that in an emergency, you can use one as a makeshift surgical knife.
147742801 wrote:
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My wife asked me if her pants made her look fat. What do you think I said?
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63797881 wrote:
82733368 wrote:
28.) Making a "Drunken Master" style character (Monk or otherwise) does not require my character to be completely shitfaced, no matter what the name (and fun interpretation) implies.
29.) Making a "Drunken Master" style character does not require ME to be completely tanked, no matter how "in-character" I want to be..