"Player's always roll" makes for a more fluid game.

Did this for attack and defense and it was a much better game experince.

The cleric rolled the saving throws for the bird-man.  He rolled low and knew he hit. He rolled high and knew he missed.  He rolled a 12, and the hit/miss response from the DM came immidiatly, since he was already looking at the paper.

It was also done for defense.   Rolling the to-hit for the monsters.  Again, the fighter rolls low and knew he was missed, rolled high and knew he was hit.  And with the DM having his sheet right in front of him, the response came immidiatly.

DM still rolled damage.


Unless the DM spends time memorizing all the monsters (like players tend to memorize their PC's), he needs to look it up every attack or defense from every monster.  Removing the die roll from him ment less tmie juggling objects, and more story (or possibly just room for juggling other objects, like mini's)


And not only does it speed up the DM's side, the players are now more involved.  As they get to participate on monster's turns.

Before:
DM: The monster swings at you, (thinking of numbers) 19 AC.
Player: Hits
DM: (thinking of numbers) 5 damage
Player: Ok.

After:
DM: The monster swings at you, with a (thinking of discription).
Player: (rolling)  that's a 19.
DM: 5 damage
Player: Ouch.


Overall the game went faster and more fluid, as well as feeling more dynamic.

guides
List of no-action attacks.
Dynamic vs Static Bonuses
Phalanx tactics and builds
Crivens! A Pictsies Guide Good
Power
s to intentionally miss with
Mr. Cellophane: How to be unnoticed
Way's to fire around corners
Crits: what their really worth
Retroactive bonus vs Static bonus.
Runepriest handbook & discussion thread
Holy Symbols to hang around your neck
Ways to Gain or Downgrade Actions
List of bonuses to saving throws
The Ghost with the Most (revenant handbook)
my builds
F-111 Interdictor Long (200+ squares) distance ally teleporter. With some warlord stuff. Broken in a plot way, not a power way.

Thought Switch Higher level build that grants upto 14 attacks on turn 1. If your allies play along, it's broken.

Elven Critters Crit op with crit generation. 5 of these will end anything. Broken.

King Fisher Optimized net user.  Moderate.

Boominator Fun catch-22 booming blade build with either strong or completely broken damage depending on your reading.

Very Distracting Warlock Lot's of dazing and major penalties to hit. Overpowered.

Pocket Protector Pixie Stealth Knight. Maximizing the defender's aura by being in an ally's/enemy's square.

Yakuza NinjIntimiAdin: Perma-stealth Striker that offers a little protection for ally's, and can intimidate bloodied enemies. Very Strong.

Chargeburgler with cheese Ranged attacks at the end of a charge along with perma-stealth. Solid, could be overpowered if tweaked.

Void Defender Defends giving a penalty to hit anyone but him, then removing himself from play. Can get somewhat broken in epic.

Scry and Die Attacking from around corners, while staying hidden. Moderate to broken, depending on the situation.

Skimisher Fly in, attack, and fly away. Also prevents enemies from coming close. Moderate to Broken depending on the enemy, but shouldn't make the game un-fun, as the rest of your team is at risk, and you have enough weaknesses.

Indestructible Simply won't die, even if you sleep though combat.  One of THE most abusive character in 4e.

Sir Robin (Bravely Charge Away) He automatically slows and pushes an enemy (5 squares), while charging away. Hard to rate it's power level, since it's terrain dependent.

Death's Gatekeeper A fun twist on a healic, making your party "unkillable". Overpowered to Broken, but shouldn't actually make the game un-fun, just TPK proof.

Death's Gatekeeper mk2, (Stealth Edition) Make your party "unkillable", and you hidden, while doing solid damage. Stronger then the above, but also easier for a DM to shut down. Broken, until your DM get's enough of it.

Domination and Death Dominate everything then kill them quickly. Only works @ 30, but is broken multiple ways.

Battlemind Mc Prone-Daze Protecting your allies by keeping enemies away. Quite powerful.

The Retaliator Getting hit deals more damage to the enemy then you receive yourself, and you can take plenty of hits. Heavy item dependency, Broken.

Dead Kobold Transit Teleports 98 squares a turn, and can bring someone along for the ride. Not fully built, so i can't judge the power.

Psilent Guardian Protect your allies, while being invisible. Overpowered, possibly broken.

Rune of Vengance Do lot's of damage while boosting your teams. Strong to slightly overpowered.

Charedent BarrageA charging ardent. Fine in a normal team, overpowered if there are 2 together, and easily broken in teams of 5.

Super Knight A tough, sticky, high damage knight. Strong.

Super Duper Knight Basically the same as super knight with items, making it far more broken.

Mora, the unkillable avenger Solid damage, while being neigh indestuctable. Overpowered, but not broken.

Swordburst Maximus At-Will Close Burst 3 that slide and prones. Protects allies with off actions. Strong, possibly over powered with the right party.

Some groups like it that way. I don't because it removes the DM's ability to alter rolls for the story's sake or make secret rolls and such.
Some groups like it that way. I don't because it removes the DM's ability to alter rolls for the story's sake or make secret rolls and such.

It's not like he has to gave up his dice completly.  Just gave up attack/save rolls.  The DM can still made stealth rolls for creatures for instance.  Or rolls for treasure, or whatever.


You are right that it does stop him from "cheating".  But I don't see that as such a bad thing though.  Especially with how much better the game ran otherwise.

It's not an obvious thing, but it really does make things more fluid.

guides
List of no-action attacks.
Dynamic vs Static Bonuses
Phalanx tactics and builds
Crivens! A Pictsies Guide Good
Power
s to intentionally miss with
Mr. Cellophane: How to be unnoticed
Way's to fire around corners
Crits: what their really worth
Retroactive bonus vs Static bonus.
Runepriest handbook & discussion thread
Holy Symbols to hang around your neck
Ways to Gain or Downgrade Actions
List of bonuses to saving throws
The Ghost with the Most (revenant handbook)
my builds
F-111 Interdictor Long (200+ squares) distance ally teleporter. With some warlord stuff. Broken in a plot way, not a power way.

Thought Switch Higher level build that grants upto 14 attacks on turn 1. If your allies play along, it's broken.

Elven Critters Crit op with crit generation. 5 of these will end anything. Broken.

King Fisher Optimized net user.  Moderate.

Boominator Fun catch-22 booming blade build with either strong or completely broken damage depending on your reading.

Very Distracting Warlock Lot's of dazing and major penalties to hit. Overpowered.

Pocket Protector Pixie Stealth Knight. Maximizing the defender's aura by being in an ally's/enemy's square.

Yakuza NinjIntimiAdin: Perma-stealth Striker that offers a little protection for ally's, and can intimidate bloodied enemies. Very Strong.

Chargeburgler with cheese Ranged attacks at the end of a charge along with perma-stealth. Solid, could be overpowered if tweaked.

Void Defender Defends giving a penalty to hit anyone but him, then removing himself from play. Can get somewhat broken in epic.

Scry and Die Attacking from around corners, while staying hidden. Moderate to broken, depending on the situation.

Skimisher Fly in, attack, and fly away. Also prevents enemies from coming close. Moderate to Broken depending on the enemy, but shouldn't make the game un-fun, as the rest of your team is at risk, and you have enough weaknesses.

Indestructible Simply won't die, even if you sleep though combat.  One of THE most abusive character in 4e.

Sir Robin (Bravely Charge Away) He automatically slows and pushes an enemy (5 squares), while charging away. Hard to rate it's power level, since it's terrain dependent.

Death's Gatekeeper A fun twist on a healic, making your party "unkillable". Overpowered to Broken, but shouldn't actually make the game un-fun, just TPK proof.

Death's Gatekeeper mk2, (Stealth Edition) Make your party "unkillable", and you hidden, while doing solid damage. Stronger then the above, but also easier for a DM to shut down. Broken, until your DM get's enough of it.

Domination and Death Dominate everything then kill them quickly. Only works @ 30, but is broken multiple ways.

Battlemind Mc Prone-Daze Protecting your allies by keeping enemies away. Quite powerful.

The Retaliator Getting hit deals more damage to the enemy then you receive yourself, and you can take plenty of hits. Heavy item dependency, Broken.

Dead Kobold Transit Teleports 98 squares a turn, and can bring someone along for the ride. Not fully built, so i can't judge the power.

Psilent Guardian Protect your allies, while being invisible. Overpowered, possibly broken.

Rune of Vengance Do lot's of damage while boosting your teams. Strong to slightly overpowered.

Charedent BarrageA charging ardent. Fine in a normal team, overpowered if there are 2 together, and easily broken in teams of 5.

Super Knight A tough, sticky, high damage knight. Strong.

Super Duper Knight Basically the same as super knight with items, making it far more broken.

Mora, the unkillable avenger Solid damage, while being neigh indestuctable. Overpowered, but not broken.

Swordburst Maximus At-Will Close Burst 3 that slide and prones. Protects allies with off actions. Strong, possibly over powered with the right party.

Players handling as much of the dice rolling as possible is a great way to really jazz up the game, as it keeps the players all engaged in the activity, rather than allowing them to semi-"check out" because it isn't their turn.

...oddly though, the most immersive and engaged I have ever seen players, and the most fluid game I have ever seen run or been a part of was a game in which the players did absolutely no rolling at all other than that required by character creation - the DM (me, in this anecdote) performed every roll behind the DM's screen.

All the players could do is tell me what their character was going to try and do, and keep track of their inventory and resources.

A note for full disclosure: This was done using AD&D 2nd edition without a lot of optional rules and only the 3 core books, so I could easily have nothing more behind my screen than a single sheet of paper that detailed the entire party's stats, a single sheet of scratch paper, the tables on the DM screen interior, and a monstrous manual nearby to reference any detail of the opposition that I hadn't (easily) memorized.

ATTENTION:  If while reading my post you find yourself thinking "Either this guy is being sarcastic, or he is an idiot," do please assume that I am an idiot. It makes reading your replies more entertaining. If, however, you find yourself hoping that I am not being even remotely serious then you are very likely correct as I find irreverence and being ridiculous to be relaxing.

I could see how that would work.

guides
List of no-action attacks.
Dynamic vs Static Bonuses
Phalanx tactics and builds
Crivens! A Pictsies Guide Good
Power
s to intentionally miss with
Mr. Cellophane: How to be unnoticed
Way's to fire around corners
Crits: what their really worth
Retroactive bonus vs Static bonus.
Runepriest handbook & discussion thread
Holy Symbols to hang around your neck
Ways to Gain or Downgrade Actions
List of bonuses to saving throws
The Ghost with the Most (revenant handbook)
my builds
F-111 Interdictor Long (200+ squares) distance ally teleporter. With some warlord stuff. Broken in a plot way, not a power way.

Thought Switch Higher level build that grants upto 14 attacks on turn 1. If your allies play along, it's broken.

Elven Critters Crit op with crit generation. 5 of these will end anything. Broken.

King Fisher Optimized net user.  Moderate.

Boominator Fun catch-22 booming blade build with either strong or completely broken damage depending on your reading.

Very Distracting Warlock Lot's of dazing and major penalties to hit. Overpowered.

Pocket Protector Pixie Stealth Knight. Maximizing the defender's aura by being in an ally's/enemy's square.

Yakuza NinjIntimiAdin: Perma-stealth Striker that offers a little protection for ally's, and can intimidate bloodied enemies. Very Strong.

Chargeburgler with cheese Ranged attacks at the end of a charge along with perma-stealth. Solid, could be overpowered if tweaked.

Void Defender Defends giving a penalty to hit anyone but him, then removing himself from play. Can get somewhat broken in epic.

Scry and Die Attacking from around corners, while staying hidden. Moderate to broken, depending on the situation.

Skimisher Fly in, attack, and fly away. Also prevents enemies from coming close. Moderate to Broken depending on the enemy, but shouldn't make the game un-fun, as the rest of your team is at risk, and you have enough weaknesses.

Indestructible Simply won't die, even if you sleep though combat.  One of THE most abusive character in 4e.

Sir Robin (Bravely Charge Away) He automatically slows and pushes an enemy (5 squares), while charging away. Hard to rate it's power level, since it's terrain dependent.

Death's Gatekeeper A fun twist on a healic, making your party "unkillable". Overpowered to Broken, but shouldn't actually make the game un-fun, just TPK proof.

Death's Gatekeeper mk2, (Stealth Edition) Make your party "unkillable", and you hidden, while doing solid damage. Stronger then the above, but also easier for a DM to shut down. Broken, until your DM get's enough of it.

Domination and Death Dominate everything then kill them quickly. Only works @ 30, but is broken multiple ways.

Battlemind Mc Prone-Daze Protecting your allies by keeping enemies away. Quite powerful.

The Retaliator Getting hit deals more damage to the enemy then you receive yourself, and you can take plenty of hits. Heavy item dependency, Broken.

Dead Kobold Transit Teleports 98 squares a turn, and can bring someone along for the ride. Not fully built, so i can't judge the power.

Psilent Guardian Protect your allies, while being invisible. Overpowered, possibly broken.

Rune of Vengance Do lot's of damage while boosting your teams. Strong to slightly overpowered.

Charedent BarrageA charging ardent. Fine in a normal team, overpowered if there are 2 together, and easily broken in teams of 5.

Super Knight A tough, sticky, high damage knight. Strong.

Super Duper Knight Basically the same as super knight with items, making it far more broken.

Mora, the unkillable avenger Solid damage, while being neigh indestuctable. Overpowered, but not broken.

Swordburst Maximus At-Will Close Burst 3 that slide and prones. Protects allies with off actions. Strong, possibly over powered with the right party.

Some groups like it that way. I don't because it removes the DM's ability to alter rolls for the story's sake or make secret rolls and such.

It's not like he has to gave up his dice completly.  Just gave up attack/save rolls.  The DM can still made stealth rolls for creatures for instance.  Or rolls for treasure, or whatever.


You are right that it does stop him from "cheating".  But I don't see that as such a bad thing though.  Especially with how much better the game ran otherwise.

It's not an obvious thing, but it really does make things more fluid.



This kind of thing should be an option for groups who want to play this way, but as for me "cheating" is sometimes an essential function of the DM. I don't want a bad roll to completely ruin the story I'm telling, because that's no fun for me, and I don't want to openly defy the dice and assert DM fiat to save the story, because that's no fun for the players. I don't do it a lot, but having the screen and the secrecy is vital for me during that moment when I really need it.

And as a player I think it would take me out of the immersion. I don't need to know what the enemy rolled on his saving throw, I just need to know if he's on fire or not. I do think this should be in a sidebar, though, for sure.
...as for me "cheating" is sometimes an essential function of the DM. I don't want a bad roll to completely ruin the story I'm telling, because that's no fun for me, and I don't want to openly defy the dice and assert DM fiat to save the story, because that's no fun for the players.

Have you tried just not rolling dice at all when one result can "ruin" the story but another cannot?

I don't mean to sound harsh or judgemental when asking that, I am just genuinely curious as to how a person that is a "story first" DM (which I am, and you seem from this comment to be as well) ends up feeling that altering a roll behind the screen for the sake of the story is solving anything - that being a different conclusion than the one that I reached, and me always striving to understand differing viewpoints so that my own may evolve.

For reference, just in case you are curious, I came to the conclusion that, for the sake of the story, I should absolutely forbid any die from being rolled unless the story will benefit, progress, and evolve no matter what number comes up... and I have never "cheated" because of it. Of course, I have also always been a believer that loss, failure, and death can be benefits to the story, so perhaps the difference is just that I have (and insist my players have, so as they can be compatible with me) a much narrower view of what could ruin a story.

ATTENTION:  If while reading my post you find yourself thinking "Either this guy is being sarcastic, or he is an idiot," do please assume that I am an idiot. It makes reading your replies more entertaining. If, however, you find yourself hoping that I am not being even remotely serious then you are very likely correct as I find irreverence and being ridiculous to be relaxing.

...as for me "cheating" is sometimes an essential function of the DM. I don't want a bad roll to completely ruin the story I'm telling, because that's no fun for me, and I don't want to openly defy the dice and assert DM fiat to save the story, because that's no fun for the players.

Have you tried just not rolling dice at all when one result can "ruin" the story but another cannot?

I don't mean to sound harsh or judgemental when asking that, I am just genuinely curious as to how a person that is a "story first" DM (which I am, and you seem from this comment to be as well) ends up feeling that altering a roll behind the screen for the sake of the story is solving anything - that being a different conclusion than the one that I reached, and me always striving to understand differing viewpoints so that my own may evolve.

For reference, just in case you are curious, I came to the conclusion that, for the sake of the story, I should absolutely forbid any die from being rolled unless the story will benefit, progress, and evolve no matter what number comes up... and I have never "cheated" because of it. Of course, I have also always been a believer that loss, failure, and death can be benefits to the story, so perhaps the difference is just that I have (and insist my players have, so as they can be compatible with me) a much narrower view of what could ruin a story.



Simple: the player shouldn't know that I'm forcing something to happen. That makes them feel railroaded by the plot, when they are used to complete freedom for their characters. If I just say "this happens, and you can't stop it," that's building a brick wall in front of the players. I can make a roll and tell them it's a miss when it's a hit because I didn't want that character to die yet, they were going to be awesome in an upcoming scene and I don't want the dice to ruin it. I can do that behind the screen and they're none the wiser that their fates are being altered, they still think the dice are in control so it feel amazing when they come out of something barely alive. For me it's a challenge of only doing that when it's necessary and not letting the players catch on. (They know that I do this, but they don't ever suspect when I do and when I don't, so I call that a success). If I just came out and said "the dice said this happened, but actually it didn't because I said so," they'd hate that, that would feel forced and contrived. That's how I run it. Hope I explained it well.
Simple: the player shouldn't know that I'm forcing something to happen. That makes them feel railroaded by the plot, when they are used to complete freedom for their characters. If I just say "this happens, and you can't stop it," that's building a brick wall in front of the players. I can make a roll and tell them it's a miss when it's a hit because I didn't want that character to die yet, they were going to be awesome in an upcoming scene and I don't want the dice to ruin it. I can do that behind the screen and they're none the wiser that their fates are being altered, they still think the dice are in control so it feel amazing when they come out of something barely alive. For me it's a challenge of only doing that when it's necessary and not letting the players catch on. (They know that I do this, but they don't ever suspect when I do and when I don't, so I call that a success). If I just came out and said "the dice said this happened, but actually it didn't because I said so," they'd hate that, that would feel forced and contrived. That's how I run it. Hope I explained it well.


I am not sure I understand you... I actually am not really sure how we got from Point A (not rolling dice if the die roll isn't good for the story no matter what the resutl) to Point B (this happens, and you can't stop it.)

I was talking about not rolling for things that the player characters are doing when failing would not be an interesting turn in the story. For example: A character trying to find information in a vast library on a mysterious item he has come across... unless him failing to find the information will enhance the story (such as by him having to experiment, where intersting circumstances might follow, or him having to seek out an NPC that will enrich the cast of characters), then I would say "Don't roll Knowledge," and proceed to describe to the player the research their character conducted and their findings.

I was absolutely not talking about putting the players on a railroad.

Specifically addressing more of your post - if I don't think the death of a character will add to the story, I don't plan out anyone attacking him (at least, not unless I plan a non-lethal attack)... but the dice fall where they may, and a player is free to start a fight with whoever or whatever they wish, and if their character ends up dead that is the direct result of their own choice.

Maybe it is just me, but I really think that feeling your players would hate it if you were tranparent about a behavior (told them outright that the die you rolled came up with a result you didn't like, so you are changing it) is a clear, and powerful, reason not to do the behavior, no matter how well you hide it... it's that whole "what they don't know won't hurt them," thing, except that it never goes that way - eventually they figure out what it was that they didn't know, and not only does it hurt them, but they are also hurt that someone deliberately kept something from them.

My gaming group, for instance, had a DM before me that they accidentally noticed fudging a roll - not only were they upset by the roll they caught him on, but also lost all faith that anything cool that ever happened (like a monster missing and attack at the right moment for the party to have a come-back victory) actually happened, and they couldn't keep playing with him as DM because of it.

ATTENTION:  If while reading my post you find yourself thinking "Either this guy is being sarcastic, or he is an idiot," do please assume that I am an idiot. It makes reading your replies more entertaining. If, however, you find yourself hoping that I am not being even remotely serious then you are very likely correct as I find irreverence and being ridiculous to be relaxing.

I don't think I explained it well. My players are well aware that sometimes the DM alters rolls. In our group, several of us DM different games, and we all do this and are aware of it, nobody is upset about it, it's part of the game for us. That's what the screen is for. Nobody thinks about it, though, we're immersed in the story. However, if there just isn't a roll where there is supposed to be one (trying to bluff someone, saving throw to avoid the falling spiked ceiling of death, minotaur's attack roll against the paralyzed character with 3 HP, etc), then the players instantly know that the result was predetermined. If there is a roll every time, and 95% of rolls do determine the outcome, nobody thinks about whether this roll is real or not. And we like it that way, very much. It's a subtle difference, but it works for us. And even though we know that the roll has a small chance of being fake, we still think it's awesome when something cool happens, because we're immersed in the game and not thinking about the table.

Are you saying your group would rather a success just be given to them than the roll be rigged in their favor? It makes no difference mechanically, but my group prefers the illusion of chance even when it isn't there.

And I didn't mean to imply that you were railroading the players. I just prefer not to let things automatically happen without a roll, even if they will happen anyway. There will always be a knowledge check for me, so I can say whether they knew the most basic information, or some obscure but fascinating and useful detail, or if they have to find some other means of learning the information. I'll always call for a roll even if the monk is guarantteed to succeed at jumping over a pit, because I want to see if he gets a natural 20 and did some incredible feat of acrobatics in the process, or gets a 1 and barely catches the edge of the other side, because we think that's cool. Basically my group likes rolling dice; other groups only use them when they're absolutely necessary, and that's fine too, but not us.

DM: The monster swings at you, with a (thinking of discription).


To me, this is the best part.  The DM gets to free up more brain space to narrate awesome stuff.
I don't think I explained it well. My players are well aware that sometimes the DM alters rolls. In our group, several of us DM different games, and we all do this and are aware of it, nobody is upset about it, it's part of the game for us. That's what the screen is for. Nobody thinks about it, though, we're immersed in the story. However, if there just isn't a roll where there is supposed to be one (trying to bluff someone, saving throw to avoid the falling spiked ceiling of death, minotaur's attack roll against the paralyzed character with 3 HP, etc), then the players instantly know that the result was predetermined. If there is a roll every time, and 95% of rolls do determine the outcome, nobody thinks about whether this roll is real or not. And we like it that way, very much. It's a subtle difference, but it works for us. And even though we know that the roll has a small chance of being fake, we still think it's awesome when something cool happens, because we're immersed in the game and not thinking about the table.

I think I get it now, and thanks for taking the time to explain. It's not a playstyle I enjoy, but it is one with obvious merits so I see how your group can enjoy it.

Are you saying your group would rather a success just be given to them than the roll be rigged in their favor? It makes no difference mechanically, but my group prefers the illusion of chance even when it isn't there.

You are right that there is no mechanical difference, but there is a significant difference socially (that seems like the wrong word) because among my group we prefer absolute honest and game transparency (they like to know that I am using the rules, and in what ways I have altered the rules and why... but of course I don't make anything but that transparent, i.e. no story spoilers) - all of us having had very bad DMs in the past that constantly betrayed the trust that they had the player's enjoyment and best interests in mind. Really though, I think that it comes to the style I run with where I am not the Storyteller so much as I am filling in the blanks and arbitrating the rules while the players tell the story.

And I didn't mean to imply that you were railroading the players. I just prefer not to let things automatically happen without a roll, even if they will happen anyway. There will always be a knowledge check for me, so I can say whether they knew the most basic information, or some obscure but fascinating and useful detail, or if they have to find some other means of learning the information. I'll always call for a roll even if the monk is guarantteed to succeed at jumping over a pit, because I want to see if he gets a natural 20 and did some incredible feat of acrobatics in the process, or gets a 1 and barely catches the edge of the other side, because we think that's cool. Basically my group likes rolling dice; other groups only use them when they're absolutely necessary, and that's fine too, but not us.

I handle some situations where success is guaranteed (because I don't want there to be a chance of failure) by using a roll. It doesn't determine if the character succeed, but rather how well they do succeed, how long it takes them to succeed, or both.

For example, just last night a character in one of my campaigns was rounding up investers to start a freight business - there was no question that the character would succeed, but he needed the money quickly to pay off a hired thief (and yes, the whole thing was a scam because the character was convincing investers to give him money to buy a boat he already owned), so it was important to know if he would get the money before the hired thief came expecting it... he rolled well and got the money after about 6 hours of shmoozing with different potential investers, but had you rolled poorly he would have only had about half of the money he needed with only a couple of hours left until he was supposed to meet the thief and pay for the stolen goods.


DM: The monster swings at you, with a (thinking of discription).


To me, this is the best part.  The DM gets to free up more brain space to narrate awesome stuff.

As a DM, I think freeing up brain space to narrate is why I prefer more simple games (like BECM D&D).

ATTENTION:  If while reading my post you find yourself thinking "Either this guy is being sarcastic, or he is an idiot," do please assume that I am an idiot. It makes reading your replies more entertaining. If, however, you find yourself hoping that I am not being even remotely serious then you are very likely correct as I find irreverence and being ridiculous to be relaxing.

I guess for my part I'd like for the dice rolls to be what they are and for the story to adapt. I would hate for a favorite NPC to get saved because the DM wanted to yank him out of danger when the dice say he died. It's a railroad, and illusion of choice or no, it'd be hard for me to game in an environment like that.

Back to the original point about PCs rolling all the rolls, I really think we need to get 5e to a place where the attacker always rolls. This whole attackers roll unless it's magic, then the defender rolls thing is archaic and reminds me of THAC0 (you want to roll high, unless it's a stat roll or save or skill check when you want to roll low--and low AC is good!)

Just have defense numbers based on ability scores. Armor increases your Con save. Heavy armor increases your Con save more but slightly reduces your Dex save. It'd be a great way to get rid of AC, streamline gameplay and run everything right off your stats.

It could be cool, in the same vein as magic attack bonuses for spellcasters to give defense bonuses to nimble, dodgy classes like the rogue or monk to reflect that their saves are just better the same way a fighter's attacks are, regardless of armor.
Now with 100% more Vorthos!


DM: The monster swings at you, with a (thinking of discription).


To me, this is the best part.  The DM gets to free up more brain space to narrate awesome stuff.

As a DM, I think freeing up brain space to narrate is why I prefer more simple games (like BECM D&D).



That's exactly why I'm hoping Next will be successful.  More of that.
Totally. I really love the new rules light, flavor heavy approach to D&D. It's fantastic!
Now with 100% more Vorthos!
I used a variation of this, in which the Monsters had a static attack score, and the players had to beat it. It was pretty interesting, but we use crits and fumbles so we had to flip those when the players rolled defensively.