DDN Summarized!....And GO!

For those like myself that are just coming to DDN and trying to figure out what the changes are from previous editions...and without doggedly going through hundreds of pages on the other threads, can some of you very frequent posters summarize what DDN is all about?

That would be greeeaat.
There is a recent thread called "What do you love about DDN", and I think this covers so much.  The people there are being honest, and they're celebrating what they love about the new game.
DDN resembles third edition in that the basic functionality is derived from the core mechanic:
Roll a d20, add and subtract modifiers, see if the result is high enough to hit the target number.

There has been some significant paring down of how many of this modifiers over needs to keep track of. One important way has been to replace many numeric modifiers with a new system called "advantage/disadvantage." If you have advantage, you get to roll two dice and take the higher. If you have disadvantage, you roll two dice and take the lower.

Classes are still being worked on. The AEDU system from 4th edition has been largely scrapped, though casting classes like wizards and clerics retain a few at-will spells so they aren't reduced to hurling rocks when they run out of their other spells. Martial classes are much simplified, and while you can use a battle map and miniatures, you no longer have to. This renders combat much faster, around the 10-minute mark.

Aesthetically, the game feels more 1st edition. Magic items are rarer. Monsters are simpler to run, with one or two special abilities, not six to eight. Little has been said about any default setting.
Great sumation profdad, TY.
6 ability scores:
Strength
Dexterity
Constitution
Intelligence
Wisdom
Charisma

4 Resolution Mechanics:
Ability Checks
Contests
Saves
Attack Rolls

and Hit Points. 

everything else is suggestion and idea building, take the pieces and put them together how you like. All you need to adjudicate the game is 6 ability scores, four resolution mechanics, and for every character to have hit points, and hit points are just a function of constitution and a die of some size (generally but you could make up your own hit point method as well).
Thanks! I enjoyed 3.X even though it had flaws...didnt care much for 4e mostly because all classes seemed carbon copies with just flavor or damage done changed...

Are saves vs Fort, Ref, Will? Or some other mechanic altogether?

Less magic items is a good thing I think, but of course people can run their world any way they want.

As a person who plays spellcasters almost exclusively what can I expect regarding spell progression,  DCs, and accumulation?
Saving Throws are all purely ability based now. So a Fortitude save is essentially a Constitution save (d20 + Con modifier). The difference is you can have Strength saves, Charisma saves etc. Its a bit of a throw back to 2nd Edition though with 3rd edition modifiers.

As for spellcasters, I find them quite similar to 3rd edition except you now have rituals, spellcasters have fewer spells per day but some spells can be cast out of combat as a ritual which require no spell slots. DCs are essentially 10 + magic ability modifier + spellcasting bonus (similar to base attack bonus but for spells)
Thanks! I enjoyed 3.X even though it had flaws...didnt care much for 4e mostly because all classes seemed carbon copies with just flavor or damage done changed...


It's mostly just like that on the surface. The classes are actually very different once you get into it, and even classes with very simialr pwoers have different uses for them.
Thanks! I enjoyed 3.X even though it had flaws...didnt care much for 4e mostly because all classes seemed carbon copies with just flavor or damage done changed...

Are saves vs Fort, Ref, Will? Or some other mechanic altogether?

Less magic items is a good thing I think, but of course people can run their world any way they want.

As a person who plays spellcasters almost exclusively what can I expect regarding spell progression,  DCs, and accumulation?



Saves are versus ability scores. So you have six of them. However, most of the spells still just require Dexterity or Wisdom saves. DC's accumulate with level but saves do not, so spells become less and less resistable as you level.

Spell slots accumulate slower than they used to. At the moment you can't expect to get more than a couple of the higher level spell slots. So basically you'll have fewer daily resources but be able to fall back on a few at-will spells to conserve those resources for when they're needed.

You probably won't be surprised by the fact that class balance isn't really emphasized yet and will remain greatly dependent on the DM and Player choices for adventure length.
In addition, your damaging at will spells become more powerful as you gain levels, so they're always a viable option if you run out of spells. Your other spells don't scale automatically, but you can cast them using a higher level spell slot to make them more powerful.

The spell and spell slot system works a little differently than in 3.5 as well. Instead of preparing each instance of each spell in each slot (so if you wanted to cast fireball 3 times in a day, you'd need to prepare three of your slots with fireball) you now prepare spells based on your level, and can cast any of your prepared spells by "expending" the spell slot, rather than the spells. (So if you want to cast fireball three times in a day, you just make sure fireball is one of your prepared spells, and then use three of your spell slots that day to cast it.)

An easier way to think of it is just that all spell casters work like 3.5 sorcerers, only they get to reselect their "spells known" every day.
what about non-damaging lowe level spells like sient image? always loved the amazing versatility of that spell in 3.x and seemed a beacon (negatively for me, obviously not for everyone) for the kind of changes 4e brought about relative to 3.x.
what about non-damaging lowe level spells like sient image? always loved the amazing versatility of that spell in 3.x and seemed a beacon (negatively for me, obviously not for everyone) for the kind of changes 4e brought about relative to 3.x.



They're still there, but you have much less spell slots so you have to use those spells more sparingly.
The Oberoni fallacy only applies to broken rules, not rules you don't like. If a rule you don't like can be easily ignored, it should exist in the game for those who will enjoy it.
They're there. Some of the more egregious ones have been slightly toned down and/or increased in level, but you've still got your fun utility spells. As the previous poster pointed out, there are fewer spell slots to dedicate to them. But many also have ritual versions, which basically allow you to take your time casting them and not use up a spell slot.
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