Can you refuse a saving throw?

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I have a feeling this would be DM discretion for many situations, but is it possible to refuse a saving throw or some of the results of a saving throw?

It makes sense that you could choose to not try to put yourself out if on fire, though it would eventually burn out on its own. Same with choosing not to catch yourself on a ledge. At the same time, it doesn't really make sense that you could choose to prevent your body from trying to neutralize a toxin.

In a similar vein, is it possible to choose to make a saving throw to not worsen, but not to actually end the effect (in the case of a "first failed save:" effect of course). For instance, if you felt some need to, would it be possible to make a saving throw against the spell sleep to avoid falling unconcious, but not to actually end the effect? Hypothetically, of course.

I would assume that RAW would be no, but I can't point to any actual ruling in the resources.
The Rules Compendium (page 228) says that creatures make saving throws at the end of their turn, not that they can make saving throws.  Since it says you do rather than you can, you must.

Think of saving throws as an automated and partly randomized timer.  It doesn't matter who rolls the d20, but someone needs to check to see how long the fire lasts, or whatever.

Thus, it's cheating to try to get out of a worse penalty that triggers when you fail a save by refusing to roll the saving throw at all.
THat's what I figured, but I think you misunderstood me on the second part (or I wrote it in terrible manner). I wasn't asking if it was possible to just say, "It doesn't get worse, I just won't save." I was asking if it is possible to save against getting worse, but voluntarily keep the previous effect of the spell. For example, if you succeed on a saving throw when hit by the spell Sleep, is it possible to remain slowed but not fall unconcious? Or must you end the whole effect all together?
there's also a cleric power that gives the cleric a save ends effect that for the purposes of the power, the cleric can choose not to save against for an additional effect.  This shows the specific (the cleric power) vs the general (normal saving throw rules).
"Non nobis Domine Sed nomini tuo da gloriam" "I wish for death not because I want to die, but because I seek the war eternal"

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THat's what I figured, but I think you misunderstood me on the second part (or I wrote it in terrible manner). I wasn't asking if it was possible to just say, "It doesn't get worse, I just won't save." I was asking if it is possible to save against getting worse, but voluntarily keep the previous effect of the spell. For example, if you succeed on a saving throw when hit by the spell Sleep, is it possible to remain slowed but not fall unconcious? Or must you end the whole effect all together?


Oh, sorry.  I think I understand now.  No, if a creature is hit by the Sleep spell and makes its first saving throw, it is no longer slowed.  It may of course choose to walk no more than 2 squares at a time, but the slowed condition no longer applies to it.
You can't refuse saves at the end of the turn, with the exception of the power Noctaem pointed out or anything else that has a similar effect.

 You can decline the saving throw to Catch yourself when falling or forced into hindering terrain, although there aren't a lot of cases where its to your advantage to do so. This is because the rule for Catching Oneself says you "can" make a saving throw, meaning it is optional:

Catching Oneself

If a target is forced over a precipice or into hindering terrain, such as lava or a pit, the target can immediately make a saving throw to avoid going over the edge or entering that terrain. If the creature saves, it falls prone in the last square it occupied before it would have fallen or entered the terrain. Otherwise, it falls over the edge or enters the terrain. Once the saving throw is resolved, the forced movement ends.
Alright, thanks. About what I was expecting to find out, but I'm glad to actually have it confirmed.