I'm really confused with 4e

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I never played d&d before and I'm having trouble with the starter box.

1. What does this mean?
ATTACK: ___ (intelligence) vs. reflex
Is it your intel. Modifier plus your reflex modifier for your attack?

2. Do different powers require different weapons? If so, can "spell" count as an implement because my wizard never obtained an implement.

3. Am I correct on how to attack?
Start with picking a weapon or power on your character sheet. Lets say if I choose "spell." I roll a 20 sided die and and that to my weapon/power bonus which is +4. If I get higher than the monsters ac, I then move onto calculating damage on my at will power.

4. For a cleric it says I get a sword and an implement. On the next page I get a mace. Do I replace the mace with a sword?

I know that these are a lot of questions but thank you for reading.
I never played d&d before and I'm having trouble with the starter box. 1. What does this mean? ATTACK: ___ (intelligence) vs. reflex Is it your intel. Modifier plus your reflex modifier for your attack?



Your attack bonus is half your level plus your int mod, plus any proficiency, enhancement, or feat bonuses you have.
In this particular case, this is very likely a spell, and you're likely level 1 without a magic weapon or implement expertise feat, so it is just your intelligence modifier.

2. Do different powers require different weapons? If so, can "spell" count as an implement because my wizard never obtained an implement.



There are in general two types of power.  Powers with the "Weapon" keyword require a weapon of some sort.  Powers with the "Implement" keyword (most spells) benefit from an implement, but do not require them to use.

3. Am I correct on how to attack? Start with picking a weapon or power on your character sheet. Lets say if I choose "spell." I roll a 20 sided die and and that to my weapon/power bonus which is +4. If I get higher than the monsters ac, I then move onto calculating damage on my at will power.



You start by picking a power.  It could be a basic attack, a regular at-will, an encounter power, whatever.
The power will say something like "Intelligence vs. Reflex" or "Strength vs. AC".
You determine your attack bonus as in #1, roll d20, add your attack bonus, and compare the result to whatever defense the ability says above (for instance, Int vs. Reflex would mean you compare to the creature's Reflex defense, not their AC).  If you TIE or get higher, then you calculate damage.

4. For a cleric it says I get a sword and an implement. On the next page I get a mace. Do I replace the mace with a sword? I know that these are a lot of questions but thank you for reading.



There seems to be a mistake in the red box. Cleric gets a mace (on page 12, section 35, it says pull a mace from your belt) but one of the graphics has a "Sword" where it shouldn't be.
I never played d&d before and I'm having trouble with the starter box. 1. What does this mean? ATTACK: ___ (intelligence) vs. reflex Is it your intel. Modifier plus your reflex modifier for your attack?


This is a d20 roll + your intelligence modifier vs. the target's Reflex defense.  If you match or beat their Reflex number, you hit.  Note that there can be lots of other modifiers that get added in depending on the situation, but that's getting ahead of ourselves.

 2. Do different powers require different weapons? If so, can "spell" count as an implement because my wizard never obtained an implement.

Some powers require a particular weapon, but the power will state this if it's the case.  Powers with the "Weapon" keyword require you use a weapon, but even your fists can be considered a weapon!  Other powers will have the "implement" keyword and that means that you MAY use an implement, like a magic wand or holy symbol with the attack, but it's not required.  If you do use an implement and the implement grants any bonuses, those bonuses get incorporated into the attack.  If you don't use an implement, you simply don't get extra bonuses.
3. Am I correct on how to attack? Start with picking a weapon or power on your character sheet. Lets say if I choose "spell." I roll a 20 sided die and and that to my weapon/power bonus which is +4. If I get higher than the monsters ac, I then move onto calculating damage on my at will power.

All attacks work the same.  First, you choose an attack power to use.  Simply using a weapon will be the "Melee Basic Attack" or "Ranged Basic Attack" power.  If you are in range to use the power you can roll a d20 and then add whatever ability modifier is in the power (STR or INT or whatever).  If it's a weapon attack you can also add a weapon proficiency bonus if you are proficient in the weapon.  There may also be many other things to add depending on the situation.  The book I believe tells you straight up what all your bonuses will be so you can just add one number.  You then add it all up and compare it to the target's defense ... the power will tell you which defense to use:  AC, FORT, REF or WILL.  If you match or beat that number, you hit, and then you roll damage as described in the power.
     4. For a cleric it says I get a sword and an implement. On the next page I get a mace. Do I replace the mace with a sword? I know that these are a lot of questions but thank you for reading.

It's up to you whether you want to replace the sword with the mace, and you could of course switch back and forth between them.   But since the book is a tutorial in this case, go with whatever weapon it tells you to use ... I can't remember the adventure and I don't have my Red Box available right now to check it.  The sword and the mace would have different proficiency bonuses and do different damage, but I'm not sure if the book just handwaves that at first to keep it simple or not.

So bottom line:  the base mechanic of the game is to always roll a d20, add or subtract modifiers, then compare it to a target number.  If you meet or beat that target number, you succeed in whatever you are trying to do.  In combat, this would result in a successful hit.  In other situations you might be trying to use your Diplomacy skill to convince someone of something or your Athletics to jump a distance.  There are an infinite number of situations and oftentimes the DM determines the target number based on how hard the situation is, and he has guidelines on what numbers are reasonable for different levels of play.

OD&D, 1E and 2E challenged the player. 3E challenged the character, not the player. Now 4E takes it a step further by challenging a GROUP OF PLAYERS to work together as a TEAM. That's why I love 4E.

"Your ability to summon a horde of celestial superbeings at will is making my ... BMX skills look a bit redundant."

"People treat their lack of imagination as if it's the measure of what's silly. Which is silly." - Noon

"Challenge" is overrated.  "Immersion" is usually just a more pretentious way of saying "having fun playing D&D."

"Falling down is how you grow.  Staying down is how you die.  It's not what happens to you, it's what you do after it happens.”

Maybe some examples will help:

1. Let's say that your Wizard has an Intelligence score of 16. That means your Wizard's Intelligence modifier is +3. So, when you make an attack, you would roll a twenty-sided die (d20) and add the INT mod of +3. Example: You choose to use Cloud of Daggers. You roll a d20 and it shows a 9. You then add your +3 modifier to that result. Now, you have a total of 12. Compare that to the target's Reflex defense. If 12 is higher than the defense value then you hit. For damage, you would roll a six-sided die (d6) and then add your INT mod of +3. So, let's say you roll a 3 on the d6. Add +3 to that result for a total of 6.

2. If a power has the 'Weapon' keyword then you can use any weapon (including your fists) with that power. Mace, sword, dagger, staff, whatever you want. As long as it's a weapon, you can use it. If it has the 'Implement' keyword then you can use any implement you choose with that power. Keep in mind that you should use a weapon or implement that you are proficient with. This means that you can add a Proficiency Bonus to your attack roll (for powers with the 'Weapon' keyword). 
Thanks for your help. A lot of my questions have been answered.

However, I'm still confused with weapons and implements. Are they added to the attack bonus (not the damage bonus) in addition to the inteligence modifier? Or can a weapon be used by itself?

Can you use multiple weapons?

At the end of the guide, it said to pick between a staff, an orb, and a wand. However, it didn't give the stats of them. Do they matter?


What is passive insight and perception?

I'm sorry for the extra questions. It's just that the game doesn't explain these well. Thank you though.
Non-magical Implements don't really matter. Non-magical weapons have a Proficiency Bonus (+2-3) and a damage die (1d4-2d6).

For powers with the Weapon keyword, you add the Proficiency Bonus of your weapon to the attack roll. If a power says X[W] in the damage line, it means you roll X Weapon Damage Dice. For instance if you had a weapon whose damage die was 2d6, and your power said 1[W], you'd roll 2d6. If your Weapon has a damage die of 1d4, you'd roll 1[W]=1d4. Etc.

If you have a Magical weapon or implement, you add the Enhancement bonus to both attack and damage rolls made with that Weapon or Implement, as long as the power has the Weapon or Implement keyword. So if you have a +1 Staff, and use an Implement Power with that staff, you would add an additional +1 to hit. So the power is Int vs Reflex. You have 18 Int (+4 Mod) and are level 2. You add 1/2 level and get 5. You add +1 from the staff, get 6. Roll a d20, you get say 11, add 6, 17 vs Reflex.

Passive Insight and Perception basically means you notice everything that can be noticed with that number. If you walk into a room with traps and the traps can be noticed with a perception score equal to or less than your passive, you just see them. No rolling needed. Emphasis on you see them, if you don't tell your party they are there and their passive perceptions are lower than yours... well.

 A weapon has a proficiency modifier - for example, a staff is a +2 proficiency weapon. If you are proficient with the staff as a weapon than you can add that proficiency bonus to your attack roll.
 Implements don't have a proficiency modifier - if you're not proficient with them, you simply can't use them.
 (Side note: Implement attacks are generally made against the non-Armor Class defenses like Will and Reflex, which are usually a couple of points lower than your AC, so the lack of proficiency bonus doesn't affect their chance to hit successfully...)
 As stated, each weapon has a damage die, and when using a weapon attack the power you used will tell you how many times to roll that die (written as [W]) and what to add to that damage total. Implement powers will simply list the amont of damage to roll.

 You can have multiple weapons in your hands, but you only attack with one weapon at a time unless the power you're using tells you to do so. If you have a weapon in each hand, say a sword and dagger, you can decide which weapon to attack with when you make the attack.

Passive Insight and Perception are each (your score in that skill) +10. When you're actively rolling for those skills you'd add your score in that skill to the result of a D20 roll and compare it to the difficulty of the skill check to see if you succeed. An active check requires you to spend an action to make the check.
However, a passive check is made whenever your character has a chance to notice something without actively looking for it - when they notice something just by walking past it or when something another person says just doesn't ring true even if you're not actively suspicious of them... (The +10 represents the average result of a D20 roll, what they would have rolled if they'd been actively looking.) If the DM has placed a tripwire in the dungeon corridor and decided that it has a difficulty of 19 to spot, when the party comes within the range at which the DM has determined the trap can be detected then he will check the DC of spotting the trap against the passive Perception scores of each of the characters.
 Anyone with a Perception modifier of +9 or higher will spot the trap without having to spend an action to do so, but anyone whose Perception modifier is lower than that would have to take an action to make an active check in order to spot it.

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Thanks for your help. A lot of my questions have been answered. However, I'm still confused with weapons and implements. Are they added to the attack bonus (not the damage bonus) in addition to the inteligence modifier?

A weapon will have a proficiency bonus and if you are proficient with that weapon you add that bonus to your attack roll any time you use a power with the "Weapon" keyword.  Implements don't have proficiency bonuses, because they usually target defenses that are slightly lower (FORT, REF, WILL) instead of AC, so they don't need the extra bonuses.  Magic weapons and implements will have Enhancement bonuses, though, and those you would add to your attack roll and damage roll. 
Or can a weapon be used by itself?

 All attacks are made by means of powers.  To just straight up attack with a weapon (swing your sword or shoot your bow) you use the Melee Basic Attack or Ranged Basic Attack power.  Everyone has these powers.
  Can you use multiple weapons?

You can wield more than one weapon at a time but the VAST majority of powers still only let you make one attack using one of those two weapons.  There are exceptions though, and those will be described in the power's stat block.
 At the end of the guide, it said to pick between a staff, an orb, and a wand. However, it didn't give the stats of them. Do they matter?

The staff, orb and wand are all Implements.  IIRC, Wizards get to pick a class feature that lets them choose one of those implements as their speciality, and based on that they will get a certain feature that makes them better with that particular implement.  I don't know the exact details, but they would be described in the Heroes of The Fallen Lands? book where they detail Wizards. 
What is passive insight and perception?

  These are whatever your Insight or Perception skill scores are + 10.  They are usually used by the DM in secret when he makes a roll against them, for example, he will roll a monster's Stealth skill to see if it beats your Passive Perception to determine whether or not you spotted the monster when you don't specifically state you are looking for monsters.  If you specifically are searching using your Perception skill, you would add your Perception skill score to a d20 roll and use that vs. the monster's Stealth score.
 I'm sorry for the extra questions. It's just that the game doesn't explain these well. Thank you though.

No problem.  Since you have so many questions though, it sounds like you're a prime candidate for taking the next step in the Essentials line which would be one or both of the Heroes Of ... books, depending on which races or classes you want to play.  These books answer all of these questions, and the Rules Compendium goes into even further detail about game rules (kind of like a referee's manual that has nothing but the rules themselves without actually telling you how to play the game).

OD&D, 1E and 2E challenged the player. 3E challenged the character, not the player. Now 4E takes it a step further by challenging a GROUP OF PLAYERS to work together as a TEAM. That's why I love 4E.

"Your ability to summon a horde of celestial superbeings at will is making my ... BMX skills look a bit redundant."

"People treat their lack of imagination as if it's the measure of what's silly. Which is silly." - Noon

"Challenge" is overrated.  "Immersion" is usually just a more pretentious way of saying "having fun playing D&D."

"Falling down is how you grow.  Staying down is how you die.  It's not what happens to you, it's what you do after it happens.”

Example: You choose to use Cloud of Daggers. You roll a d20 and it shows a 9. You then add your +3 modifier to that result. Now, you have a total of 12. Compare that to the target's Reflex defense. If 12 is higher than the defense value then you hit.

I'm going to nitpick, but this is important for a new player to know.  You don't have to BEAT the defense score, you just have to AT LEAST MATCH it.  This is why you will sometimes hear the number you need to hit called a "target DC (Difficulty Class)."  Think of the defense as a TARGET you have to reach, then you won't get confused.

Even playing with people who have been playing for years, sometimes when they make an attack roll and match the defense score, they hesitate because they're not sure if they hit or not.  They did hit.  All you have to do is match that target DC; you don't have to exceed it. 

In this example, since you rolled a total of 12, you would hit the enemy if their defense value was 12 or less. 

OD&D, 1E and 2E challenged the player. 3E challenged the character, not the player. Now 4E takes it a step further by challenging a GROUP OF PLAYERS to work together as a TEAM. That's why I love 4E.

"Your ability to summon a horde of celestial superbeings at will is making my ... BMX skills look a bit redundant."

"People treat their lack of imagination as if it's the measure of what's silly. Which is silly." - Noon

"Challenge" is overrated.  "Immersion" is usually just a more pretentious way of saying "having fun playing D&D."

"Falling down is how you grow.  Staying down is how you die.  It's not what happens to you, it's what you do after it happens.”

Good catch.