Dragons with Weapons

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This is something thats kind of bothered me for a while. Can dragons use weapons? I would assume no given their physical characteristics. They tend to walk on all four legs, so I can't really picture them holding swords. Wearing armor sure, I could easily imagine a dragon having custom armor for itself.

However, I'm interested in having dragons that can wield weapons. To that extent I'm thinking about creating special dragon friendly weapons. Things like swords they can wear on their claws, tail blades, and maybe some sort of fang based weapon like iron jaws.

I can't decide if this is a good idea or not. I'm just looking for some input on the matter. Maybe some suggestions for possible weapons.

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You may escape into it at will. You need no secret password, no magic wand or Aladdin's lamp;

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A dragon IS a weapon.
Yes; as a DM all you have to do is this
"In this world dragons can use weapons and wear armor"

Role-play wise it is a super easy fix, go with the super magical dragons; the dragons are all basickly super old and have a great deal of magical power; the abiltiy to shape their hands, or to hold weapon hilts to match their claws, is an easy feat for them.
As well the ability to summon magical armor or turn mundane armor so it would fit them is as easy.

Any weapon would work; could change it depending on type of dragon.

Red Dragons maybe use crystalized lava for their materials.
Black Dragons maybe use raw steel that has been molded with acid
White Dragons maybe use weapons/armor mabe of solid light.

Mechanics wise I wouldn't change anything; just pick up a regual dragon block and simply refluff their attacks as weapon attacks.

If the player aqquired one of these weapons just choose something that looks right and fluff it into a dragon weapon
Love the idea; and good lucl.

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/1.jpg)

You know those forearm crutches that some people use instead of the more traditional underarm?

If a quadruped used manufactured blades, clubs and spears instead of their natural weapons, I imagine that they'd look something like that. Less flexibility than normal, but probably greater control.

I also imagine that a spear would be the more useful for aerial melee combat than would a swinging weapon like a blade or club.

Founder - but not owner - of Just Say Yes!

Member of LGBT Gamers

Odds are, if 4-6 people can't figure out an answer you thought was obvious, you screwed up, not them. - JeffGroves
Which is why a DM should present problems to solve, not solutions to find. -FlatFoot
Why there should be the option to use alignment systems:
Show
If some people are heavily benefiting from the inclusion of alignment, then it would behoove those that AREN'T to listen up and pay attention to how those benefits are being created and enjoyed, no? -YagamiFire
But equally important would be for those who do enjoy those benefits to entertain the possibility that other people do not value those benefits equally or, possibly, do not see them as benefits in the first place. -wrecan (RIP)
That makes sense. However, it is not fair to continually attack those that benefit for being, somehow, deviant for deriving enjoyment from something that you cannot. Instead, alignment is continually attacked...it is demonized...and those that use it are lumped in with it.

 

I think there is more merit in a situation where someone says "This doesn't work! It's broken!" and the reply is "Actually it works fine for me. Have you considered your approach might be causing it?"

 

than a situation where someone says "I use this system and the way I use it works really well!" and the back and forth is "No! It is a broken bad system!" -YagamiFire

Large dragonborn with wings.
Back to Basics - A Guide to Basic Attacks You might be playing DnD wrong if... "Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former." Albert Einstein
Dragons could easily wear tail clubs and spikes, and in their claw hands, carry objects even if a little clumsily. They would have an easy time gripping, but a harder time maneuvering.

I would have the dragons have weapons and armor that exists in "humanoid" form but not in dragon form. In my game, all dragons have 2 humanoid forms; one which looks like a dragon except medium size; and another which is actually humanoid looking (however, by the bone structure anyone can tell the difference). Some dragons who live among human societies might go a very long time without living in dragon form.


That said, I would allow dragons to use any type of weapon your players found believable and acceptable. If your players despise the idea of dragons with weapons, tell them "that dragon was trying to start a fad; good you stopped it, 'eh?"  Then you can join the mockery instead of being the joke!  Ask your players, ask your players, ask your players.

Maybe if you tell them "Look guys, my vision of a dragon is a bit more dangerous than the one in the book." and get their feedback. Maybe they want stronger dragons without "objects", otherwise you can look at the "slots" a dragon "could" wear:  bracelets (replacing rings) amulet, tail ornamentation.

Psionic Skins, magical paint, and headpieces. For a headpiece, either a crown, or a helmet made from the skull of a bigger dragon, maybe their horns have rings or something.

Within; Without.

...Mechanics wise I wouldn't change anything; just pick up a regular dragon block and simply refluff their attacks as weapon attacks.

If the player acquired one of these weapons, just choose something that looks right and fluff it into a dragon weapon...




Quoted for emphasis.
[spoiler New DM Tips]
  • Trying to solve out-of-game problems (like cheating, bad attitudes, or poor sportsmanship) with in-game solutions will almost always result in failure, and will probably make matters worse.
  • Gun Safety Rule #5: Never point the gun at anything you don't intend to destroy. (Never introduce a character, PC, NPC, Villain, or fate of the world into even the possibility of a deadly combat or other dangerous situation, unless you are prepared to destroy it instantly and completely forever.)
  • Know your group's character sheets, and check them over carefully. You don't want surprises, but, more importantly, they are a gold mine of ideas!
  • "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." It's a problem if the players aren't having fun and it interferes with a DM's ability to run the game effectively; if it's not a problem, 'fixing' at best does little to help, and at worst causes problems that didn't exist before.
  • "Hulk Smash" characters are a bad match for open-ended exploration in crowds of civilians; get them out of civilization where they can break things and kill monsters in peace.
  • Success is not necessarily the same thing as killing an opponent. Failure is not necessarily the same thing as dying.
  • Failure is always an option. And it's a fine option, too, as long as failure is interesting, entertaining, and fun!
[/spoiler] The New DM's Group Horror in RPGs "This is exactly what the Leprechauns want you to believe!" - Merb101 "Broken or not, unbalanced or not, if something seems to be preventing the game from being enjoyable, something has to give: either that thing, or other aspects of the game, or your idea of what's enjoyable." - Centauri
The main limitation for a dragon as compared to a humanoid is the need to use their forelimbs to walk around. Any weapon that doesn't run up against that - throwing weapons, weapons attached to other limbs, weapons attached to the sides of the forelimbs (rather than held in the 'hand'), and/or weapons meant to be used while flying are all perfectly reasonable.
I like this idea. Go for it. As mentioned, there's not much to change. Fictionally speakingm the dragon under all the armor and weapons would be actually less powerful than a dragon of the same level without the equipment. Lots of cool fiction can stem from that.

The rules give a bit of a nod toward this, actually: per one of the 4e Draconomicon books, a dragon can swallow any magical item and use its powers as if it were wielding it.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

No reason why they can't, they would most likely be adapted to enhance his natural weapons, such as a spiked tail club, adamantine claws, jaws, tail sling for tossing boulders, with all the magical enhancements of course. 3.5s dragononicon had a list of dragon weapons and items that they could use
For what it's worth, I seem to recall that Smaug from The Hobbit actually wore metal armor of a sort:  Smaug slept on treasture until it was embedded into his skin... I'm pretty sure that the armor ended up being a plot point in the story.



In any event, you don't really need validation from the fluff or any sort of literary or mythological precedent - as long as it doesn't result in a game-breaking change of rules, follow the Rule of Cool.  In a generic D&D world, dragons might not be able to use swords because they crawl around on all four legs, but in your own fantasy setting, it's up to you and your players what dragons can and can't do.
[spoiler New DM Tips]
  • Trying to solve out-of-game problems (like cheating, bad attitudes, or poor sportsmanship) with in-game solutions will almost always result in failure, and will probably make matters worse.
  • Gun Safety Rule #5: Never point the gun at anything you don't intend to destroy. (Never introduce a character, PC, NPC, Villain, or fate of the world into even the possibility of a deadly combat or other dangerous situation, unless you are prepared to destroy it instantly and completely forever.)
  • Know your group's character sheets, and check them over carefully. You don't want surprises, but, more importantly, they are a gold mine of ideas!
  • "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." It's a problem if the players aren't having fun and it interferes with a DM's ability to run the game effectively; if it's not a problem, 'fixing' at best does little to help, and at worst causes problems that didn't exist before.
  • "Hulk Smash" characters are a bad match for open-ended exploration in crowds of civilians; get them out of civilization where they can break things and kill monsters in peace.
  • Success is not necessarily the same thing as killing an opponent. Failure is not necessarily the same thing as dying.
  • Failure is always an option. And it's a fine option, too, as long as failure is interesting, entertaining, and fun!
[/spoiler] The New DM's Group Horror in RPGs "This is exactly what the Leprechauns want you to believe!" - Merb101 "Broken or not, unbalanced or not, if something seems to be preventing the game from being enjoyable, something has to give: either that thing, or other aspects of the game, or your idea of what's enjoyable." - Centauri
I think every part of a dragon is a weapon more fiersome that any man-made.  How can you make them better, I donno.  Unless you put big-ass cannons on his back, jet booster for greater fly speed.  Stuff like that maybe.  His claws are sharper and harder then a steel sword.  
 I can imagine a fantasy world in which dragons use weapons against other dragons. Their natural abilities are more than a match against any other race, but against one another, when you all can fly, have claws and a tail, have breath weapons and natural armor, you require more of an edge.

I would make draconic weapons unique to named dragons, and only brought out under very unique and important circumstances (which should be the focus of the adventure and why the adventure is taking place).

If you believe the Great Red Dragon Garmauth has a fabled weapon of power, you need to set him up against another dragon to have any chance of seeing, much less capturing, said weapon. Anything else he will just roast and eat with his natural weapons.
The main limitation for a dragon as compared to a humanoid is the need to use their forelimbs to walk around. Any weapon that doesn't run up against that - throwing weapons, weapons attached to other limbs, weapons attached to the sides of the forelimbs (rather than held in the 'hand'), and/or weapons meant to be used while flying are all perfectly reasonable.



Speaking form personal experience?
The sea looks at the stabillity of the mountian and sighs. The mountian watches the freedom of the sea and cries.
The main limitation for a dragon as compared to a humanoid is the need to use their forelimbs to walk around. Any weapon that doesn't run up against that - throwing weapons, weapons attached to other limbs, weapons attached to the sides of the forelimbs (rather than held in the 'hand'), and/or weapons meant to be used while flying are all perfectly reasonable.

Speaking form personal experience?

As much as anybody is about anything on a "Wizards of the Coast: Dungeons&Dragons" forum

Founder - but not owner - of Just Say Yes!

Member of LGBT Gamers

Odds are, if 4-6 people can't figure out an answer you thought was obvious, you screwed up, not them. - JeffGroves
Which is why a DM should present problems to solve, not solutions to find. -FlatFoot
Why there should be the option to use alignment systems:
Show
If some people are heavily benefiting from the inclusion of alignment, then it would behoove those that AREN'T to listen up and pay attention to how those benefits are being created and enjoyed, no? -YagamiFire
But equally important would be for those who do enjoy those benefits to entertain the possibility that other people do not value those benefits equally or, possibly, do not see them as benefits in the first place. -wrecan (RIP)
That makes sense. However, it is not fair to continually attack those that benefit for being, somehow, deviant for deriving enjoyment from something that you cannot. Instead, alignment is continually attacked...it is demonized...and those that use it are lumped in with it.

 

I think there is more merit in a situation where someone says "This doesn't work! It's broken!" and the reply is "Actually it works fine for me. Have you considered your approach might be causing it?"

 

than a situation where someone says "I use this system and the way I use it works really well!" and the back and forth is "No! It is a broken bad system!" -YagamiFire

The main limitation for a dragon as compared to a humanoid is the need to use their forelimbs to walk around. Any weapon that doesn't run up against that - throwing weapons, weapons attached to other limbs, weapons attached to the sides of the forelimbs (rather than held in the 'hand'), and/or weapons meant to be used while flying are all perfectly reasonable.



Speaking form personal experience?


I see what you did there.
Thinking about creating a race for 4e? Make things a lil' easier on yourself by reading my Race Mechanic Creation Guide first.
If you believe the Great Red Dragon Garmauth has a fabled weapon of power, you need to set him up against another dragon to have any chance of seeing, much less capturing, said weapon. Anything else he will just roast and eat with his natural weapons.



That's a great set up for a Xorvintaal campaign. I might try that next time I run one.
AS far as I know, dragons have enough manual dexterity to cast spells so they should be able to use weapons of their size, I just don't think it would really occur to them to try that. Also, a dragon may walk on all fours but it doesn't it can't stand on 2 legs.
I don't feel like looking up their 4th Edition counterparts, but -

Even the generally stupidest varieties of 3rd Edition Great Wyrm Dragons (such as Great Wyrm White Dragons) have intelligence and wisdom in the 20's... they're sharp, brilliant, clever, and inventive on a scale that dwarfs real-world human beings.  I'd be surprised if the 4th Edition equivalents were much different.

Whatever the artwork in the books depict, dragons are exceptional and talented tool-users in my book.

Whether they do the damage they do because their claws are that sharp, or because they are armed with enchanted weapons of their own design, they still drop that Magical Vorpal +12 Pointy Stick at the end of the combat... so why not describe the Dragon actually using that weapon? 

(What?  A Magical Vorpal +12 Pointy Stick that your Level 19.7 Gnome Ankle-biter can use would be "too small" for a Dragon to use?  Did I mention that it was a magical pointy stick, dropped by a magic-using Dragon?  Why can't the magical monster and the Gnome use the same magic pointy stick again?)
[spoiler New DM Tips]
  • Trying to solve out-of-game problems (like cheating, bad attitudes, or poor sportsmanship) with in-game solutions will almost always result in failure, and will probably make matters worse.
  • Gun Safety Rule #5: Never point the gun at anything you don't intend to destroy. (Never introduce a character, PC, NPC, Villain, or fate of the world into even the possibility of a deadly combat or other dangerous situation, unless you are prepared to destroy it instantly and completely forever.)
  • Know your group's character sheets, and check them over carefully. You don't want surprises, but, more importantly, they are a gold mine of ideas!
  • "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." It's a problem if the players aren't having fun and it interferes with a DM's ability to run the game effectively; if it's not a problem, 'fixing' at best does little to help, and at worst causes problems that didn't exist before.
  • "Hulk Smash" characters are a bad match for open-ended exploration in crowds of civilians; get them out of civilization where they can break things and kill monsters in peace.
  • Success is not necessarily the same thing as killing an opponent. Failure is not necessarily the same thing as dying.
  • Failure is always an option. And it's a fine option, too, as long as failure is interesting, entertaining, and fun!
[/spoiler] The New DM's Group Horror in RPGs "This is exactly what the Leprechauns want you to believe!" - Merb101 "Broken or not, unbalanced or not, if something seems to be preventing the game from being enjoyable, something has to give: either that thing, or other aspects of the game, or your idea of what's enjoyable." - Centauri
Yeah, fans of fantasy often forget the Prime Directive of fantasy: It's pretend, it does whatever you want it to do.

If you want to argue dragon physiology with me, you'd better be prepared to hear my dissertation on leprechaun/unicorn conspiracy theories.
...Leprechauns? 

Man, I knew those little creeps must be guilty of something!



...You face Death Itself in the form of One Leprechaun Conspirator...
...The Leprechaun Conpsirator gropes at you for 1 point of damage...
[spoiler New DM Tips]
  • Trying to solve out-of-game problems (like cheating, bad attitudes, or poor sportsmanship) with in-game solutions will almost always result in failure, and will probably make matters worse.
  • Gun Safety Rule #5: Never point the gun at anything you don't intend to destroy. (Never introduce a character, PC, NPC, Villain, or fate of the world into even the possibility of a deadly combat or other dangerous situation, unless you are prepared to destroy it instantly and completely forever.)
  • Know your group's character sheets, and check them over carefully. You don't want surprises, but, more importantly, they are a gold mine of ideas!
  • "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." It's a problem if the players aren't having fun and it interferes with a DM's ability to run the game effectively; if it's not a problem, 'fixing' at best does little to help, and at worst causes problems that didn't exist before.
  • "Hulk Smash" characters are a bad match for open-ended exploration in crowds of civilians; get them out of civilization where they can break things and kill monsters in peace.
  • Success is not necessarily the same thing as killing an opponent. Failure is not necessarily the same thing as dying.
  • Failure is always an option. And it's a fine option, too, as long as failure is interesting, entertaining, and fun!
[/spoiler] The New DM's Group Horror in RPGs "This is exactly what the Leprechauns want you to believe!" - Merb101 "Broken or not, unbalanced or not, if something seems to be preventing the game from being enjoyable, something has to give: either that thing, or other aspects of the game, or your idea of what's enjoyable." - Centauri
...Leprechauns? 

Man, I knew those little creeps must be guilty of something!



...You face Death Itself in the form of One Leprechaun Conspirator...
...The Leprechaun Conpsirator gropes at you for 1 point of damage...



Believe me when I say this goes all the way to the top ... of the rainbow.

Things like swords they can wear on their claws, tail blades, and maybe some sort of fang based weapon like iron jaws.




What a stupid idea!
Things like swords they can wear on their claws, tail blades, and maybe some sort of fang based weapon like iron jaws.



What a stupid idea!



How so? Wasn’t sure if you where trying to be sarcastic or not.

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/1.jpg)

Things like swords they can wear on their claws, tail blades, and maybe some sort of fang based weapon like iron jaws.



What a stupid idea!



How so? Wasn’t sure if you where trying to be sarcastic or not.




With claws that can rend flesh and jaws that can snap an ogre in two its impractical and inefficient to try and attach weapons to a dragon. Not only that but attaching blades to a dragons tail will do the dragon more harm than anything else, having blades whirling about during flight or combat. A dragon doesnt need to be altered in any way!

Things like swords they can wear on their claws, tail blades, and maybe some sort of fang based weapon like iron jaws.

What a stupid idea!

Stupid AWESOME.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

A dragon doesnt need to be altered in any way!




Maybe they are worried about that vulnerability under their arm, so they decide to wear armour?

Maybe they lost a claw to a pesky adventurer and had to find an alternative?  What would happen if you tried to attach the Hand of Vecna to a dragon's stump?

Dragon's are master spell crafters, who knows what things they might have constructed over the years?
A dragon doesnt need to be altered in any way!





In your opinion; there have been plenty of reasons and explanations of how role-play wise it would work and make sense.

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/1.jpg)



Dragon's are master spell crafters, who knows what things they might have constructed over the years?




With such a command of magic, the abiliy to heal and to shapeshift, any material contruct will pale by comparrison.
With such a command of magic, the abiliy to heal and to shapeshift, any material contruct will pale by comparrison.

If that's what you believe, then of course it's true. For you.

Dragons in 4th Edition are not inherently magically inclined anyway. I never understood why they were, except that magic dominates so much as high levels in past editions that anything without it gets left in its own dust.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

A dragon doesnt need to be altered in any way!





In your opinion; there have been plenty of reasons and explanations of how role-play wise it would work and make sense.




It's illogical and it de-values what it is to be a dragon. An argument could be made, perhaps, for armour on certain vulnerable areas but not for dragons carrying weapons. Sounds like it was thought up by a 13 year old because they thought it would be 'cool'. Even in a world of fantasy, there are rules which govern it to make it believable.

Even in a world of fantasy, there are rules which govern it to make it believable.

Sure. But not everyone follows the same rules in their game. Nor should they.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

With such a command of magic, the abiliy to heal and to shapeshift, any material contruct will pale by comparrison.

If that's what you believe, then of course it's true. For you.

Dragons in 4th Edition are not inherently magically inclined anyway. I never understood why they were, except that magic dominates so much as high levels in past editions that anything without it gets left in its own dust.




Let us talk about the wild, animalistic dragons then which have no inherent command of magic. As i've just said in my last post, an argument can only be made for wearing armour about vulnerable places. There can be no valid argument for dragons and weapons. To make it believable, even a fantasy world must be governed by rules and logic.
Let us talk about the wild, animalistic dragons then which have no inherent command of magic.

Neither are they wild and animalistic. The point is, it makes as much sense for them to use magic as it does for them to use items. Or to use neither.

As i've just said in my last post, an argument can only be made for wearing armour about vulnerable places. There can be no valid argument for dragons and weapons.

For you.

To make it believable, even a fantasy world must be governed by rules and logic.

Yes, but everyone finds different things believable, for different reasons. There's nothing universally right about your position, as true as it may be for your own games.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

Even in a world of fantasy, there are rules which govern it to make it believable.

Sure. But not everyone follows the same rules in their game. Nor should they.



Can you then present a logical argument then for dragons carrying weapons? As to someone mentioning replacing a lost limb, it still critically reduces the effectiveness of the dragon. However, in the original post that started this thread these weapons are proposed as 'enhancements'. What logical argument is there for these 'enhancements'?

Even in a world of fantasy, there are rules which govern it to make it believable.

Sure. But not everyone follows the same rules in their game. Nor should they.

Can you then present a logical argument then for dragons carrying weapons? As to someone mentioning replacing a lost limb, it still critically reduces the effectiveness of the dragon. However, in the original post that started this thread these weapons are proposed as 'enhancements'. What logical argument is there for these 'enhancements'?


Same reason as humans: being deadlier than the other guy. If the other guy is a regular dragon, and I am a dragon with a spear strapped to my fore-arm to functionally double my reach, I can kill him more easily without him being able to reach me to hurt me back. And then he starts using armor and/or longer spears...

Most importantly, looking for excuses to make something cool happen in a Fantasy Game is a lot more fun than looking for excuses not to.

Founder - but not owner - of Just Say Yes!

Member of LGBT Gamers

Odds are, if 4-6 people can't figure out an answer you thought was obvious, you screwed up, not them. - JeffGroves
Which is why a DM should present problems to solve, not solutions to find. -FlatFoot
Why there should be the option to use alignment systems:
Show
If some people are heavily benefiting from the inclusion of alignment, then it would behoove those that AREN'T to listen up and pay attention to how those benefits are being created and enjoyed, no? -YagamiFire
But equally important would be for those who do enjoy those benefits to entertain the possibility that other people do not value those benefits equally or, possibly, do not see them as benefits in the first place. -wrecan (RIP)
That makes sense. However, it is not fair to continually attack those that benefit for being, somehow, deviant for deriving enjoyment from something that you cannot. Instead, alignment is continually attacked...it is demonized...and those that use it are lumped in with it.

 

I think there is more merit in a situation where someone says "This doesn't work! It's broken!" and the reply is "Actually it works fine for me. Have you considered your approach might be causing it?"

 

than a situation where someone says "I use this system and the way I use it works really well!" and the back and forth is "No! It is a broken bad system!" -YagamiFire

Even in a world of fantasy, there are rules which govern it to make it believable.

Sure. But not everyone follows the same rules in their game. Nor should they.

Can you then present a logical argument then for dragons carrying weapons?

Of course. Several have been presented here already. But logical arguments about a fictional world aren't like logical arguments about the real world. Anyone, such as yourself, can always just add more fictional reasons why something can't work. We call that "blocking," and it's immature and uncreative, as well as a waste of imagination.

As to someone mentioning replacing a lost limb, it still critically reduces the effectiveness of the dragon.

Sez you. It could just as plausibly enhance the effectiveness of the dragon.

However, in the original post that started this thread these weapons are proposed as 'enhancements'. What logical argument is there for these 'enhancements'?

Any you like. If you don't like any, then none. For you. Luckily, it's not necessary to convince you of anything.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

A dragon using weapons is as logical and reasonable as a dragon existing in the first place. If you can believe in dragons, you can believe in dragons with weapons. If you choose not to, well, that's a different story.

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Even in a world of fantasy, there are rules which govern it to make it believable.

Sure. But not everyone follows the same rules in their game. Nor should they.

Can you then present a logical argument then for dragons carrying weapons? As to someone mentioning replacing a lost limb, it still critically reduces the effectiveness of the dragon. However, in the original post that started this thread these weapons are proposed as 'enhancements'. What logical argument is there for these 'enhancements'?


Same reason as humans: being deadlier than the other guy. If the other guy is a regular dragon, and I am a dragon with a spear strapped to my fore-arm to functionally double my reach, I can kill him more easily without him being able to reach me to hurt me back. And then he starts using armor and/or longer spears...

Most importantly, looking for excuses to make something cool happen in a Fantasy Game is a lot more fun than looking for excuses not to.




Human evolution and the evolution of human intelligence has allowed for us to create weapons that make us a more effective killing machine opposed to using our bare hands. It has not been necessary for the survival of dragons to create weapons of war due to the effectiveness of their own claws and jaws. And let us take a spear. For humans it is deadlier than our hands, has greater reach than a sword and would give the wielder a tactical advantage. A wooden spear made for a dragon would hardly be able to withstand the forces placed upon it by the dragon. To make it stronger, out of iron or steal would make it unwieldly. And, most importantly, a dragon is a quadroped. We have hands free to wield a weapon. A dragon requires all four legs for movement and to support its massive bulk.

Human evolution and the evolution of human intelligence has allowed for us to create weapons that make us a more effective killing machine opposed to using our bare hands. It has not been necessary for the survival of dragons to create weapons of war due to the effectiveness of their own claws and jaws. And let us take a spear. For humans it is deadlier than our hands, has greater reach than a sword and would give the wielder a tactical advantage. A wooden spear made for a dragon would hardly be able to withstand the forces placed upon it by the dragon. To make it stronger, out of iron or steal would make it unwieldly. And, most importantly, a dragon is a quadroped. We have hands free to wield a weapon. A dragon requires all four legs for movement and to support its massive bulk.

Meh, boring. I choose to disbelieve or use equally scientific facts to disprove all of that. See how my doing that doesn't affect your game at all, while making mine more enjoyable for my group?

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

A dragon using weapons is as logical and reasonable as a dragon existing in the first place. If you can believe in dragons, you can believe in dragons with weapons. If you choose not to, well, that's a different story.




Incorrect. Thats no better than saying 'I believe in horses, so why not horses carrying swords and shields into battle'. Before the emergence of the idea of dragons with weapons was the mythical dragon as a dragon, an animal. It was given four legs, two wings, claws and teeth. It cannot wield weapons. To have the idea now that they somehow can wield weapons would fundamentally change what a dragon is and what you would have as a result would be something new and not a dragon. If you change the biology of a horse so it can wield a sword, is it still a horse?

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