Rules differences between 4e and 3.5/Pathfinder

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I'm trying to capture this all in one place, so I can distribute to my players.  We've been running a Pathfinder AP but I would like to take break between chapters and run 4e to take a break and enjoy the things that, I think 4e, does really well.  

I'm asking for help from yall.  I know this is similiar to "rules you didn't realize" thread, but that was is less useful since the op is gone.  

4e: Charge is a standard action. You can do anything you like that you have the actions for before the charge (movement, drawing weapons, etc). After the charge is resolved your turn ends regardless of any available actions remaining. Exceptions are using action points to gain more actions (and then using those actions) or something that specifically states it can be used after a charge. 
3.5e: Charge is a full round action which ends your turn after it is resolved, barring specific abilities that state they can be used after a charge.


4e: You get 1 Opportunity attack per turn, enemy or ally. They can not be used on your own turn. 
3.5e: You get 1 Attack of Opportunity per round, barring feats or other abilities that give you more (Combat Reflexes being the main one).

4e: To roll a saving throw, you roll a 1d20 (without modifiers unless granted one by a power), and you succed with a roll of 10 or higher.
3.5e/Pathfinder: There are three types of savings throws which act as your modifier to a d20 roll: Fortitute, Reflext and Will.  You roll vs a DC as determined by DM.

 
Charge is a standard action that also involves moving. So you can move then charge, effectively doubling your movement range+attacking at the end.

You can take one OA per turn (monsters each get their own turn, remember).

There really isn't a lot of similarity between the two rulesets. I anticipate you and your players getting pretty confused.
Charge is a standard action that also involves moving. So you can move then charge, effectively doubling your movement range+attacking at the end.

You can take one OA per turn (monsters each get their own turn, remember).

There really isn't a lot of similarity between the two rulesets. I anticipate you and your players getting pretty confused.

Terminology is similiar, which I think is where the confusion comes from. 
 
Since I like picking nits Wink


4e: Charge is a standard action. You can do anything you like that you have the actions for before the charge (movement, drawing weapons, etc). After the charge is resolved your turn ends regardless of any available actions remaining. Exceptions are using action points to gain more actions (and then using those actions) or something that specifically states it can be used after a charge.

I'm fairly certain Free actions can be used also, but I'm not positive.

3.5e: Charge is a full round action which ends your turn after it is resolved, barring specific abilities that state they can be used after a charge.


4e: You get 1 Opportunity attack per turn, enemy or ally. They can not be used on your own turn.

3.5e: You get 1 Attack of Opportunity per round, barring feats or other abilities that give you more (Combat Reflexes being the main one).


Note the difference between turn and round. Each participant in the encounter gets a turn during each round of combat. 
Since I like picking nits Wink


4e: Charge is a standard action. You can do anything you like that you have the actions for before the charge (movement, drawing weapons, etc). After the charge is resolved your turn ends regardless of any available actions remaining. Exceptions are using action points to gain more actions (and then using those actions) or something that specifically states it can be used after a charge.

I'm fairly certain Free actions can be used also, but I'm not positive.

3.5e: Charge is a full round action which ends your turn after it is resolved, barring specific abilities that state they can be used after a charge.


4e: You get 1 Opportunity attack per turn, enemy or ally. They can not be used on your own turn.

3.5e: You get 1 Attack of Opportunity per round, barring feats or other abilities that give you more (Combat Reflexes being the main one).


Note the difference between turn and round. Each participant in the encounter gets a turn during each round of combat. 

I liked your wording and accurancy.  Changed in OP. 
Another difference in Charge between 3.5 and 4e is that you no longer need to charge in a straight line.  The only requirement in 4e is that each square of movement brings you 1 square closer to the target.  You can also jump, climb, etc during a charge as long as you're always moving closer.

  Also remember that distance and movement in 4e is measured purely in squares, even diagonally - you don't have to mess with every other diagonal square counting as 2 squares.

 If an OA or interrupt hits moves your position mid charge (like the OA did a Push 2), you can still continue moving to the end of your movement and complete the charge if you have enough movement squares to get within range of the target.   If the OA/Interrupt actually stops your movement (immobilize) or dazes you and you took at least one other action befor the charge, then the charge stops.
If the OA/Interrupt actually stops your movement (immobilize) or dazes you and you took at least one other action befor the charge, then the charge stops.

Charging is a weird situation since it's an action that contains movement and an attack.   

If you get immobilized before you charge or during the charge, yeah, you're pretty much done charging since you can't move any further to your target. 

But regarding a daze situation, the OA interrupts leaving a square, even if it's the first square of movement of a charge; it doesn't interrupt the charge action, and doesn't prevent the charger from completing his action because the daze doesn't happen before he charged, it only happened before he left a particular threatened square.

If you're in the middle of taking an action (charge) when you get dazed, I don't see how that denies you the ability to finish taking your action ... the actions you may or may not have taken before you got dazed aren't relevant.  Just because the action you're taking involves movement doesn't mean the daze interrupted your action, it just interrupted one particular square of movement.

Plus, I still say that Daze doesn't care which actions you took before you got Dazed ... in other words, just because you got Dazed in the middle of your turn after taking an action doesn't mean you still don't get to take one more action.  The Dazed condition only applies after you get Dazed and you don't get limited to one action until you get Dazed, not before.  But that's another argument for another thread.

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@Despana: You can use free actions after a charge (hence your ability to use an Action Point (which is a free action)).