A red dragon like Smaug and a new Draconomicon book?

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I would not be suprised if this has been posted before, and I apologize if I bring it up again. I have taken a recent interest in dragons themselves as well as the Dungeons and Dragons game after watching the first The Hobbit film. I am wondering if it is possible that an individual large Red Dragon can resemble or match Smaug? The original story of The Hobbit could be a classic quest, or it can have other different plots instead. Based on the recent Draconomicon book, the dragons due have similarities to how dragans are of Middle-Earth, and the Red Dragon matches Smaug even more closely. I think it would be awesome to add a dragon like him to the universe of the game. 

Also, will their likely be a new  Draconomicon book? It would be sweet to learn new information about the game's dragons and see new artwork. 
A Draconomicon for Chromatic Dragons has already been published for D&D 4th edition. Yes its possible for a Red Dragon to ressemble Smaug. Here are some Red Dragon statistics, artwork amd miniature figurine for D&D 4th edition if interested;



Red Dragon Statistics

Adult Red Dragon
Large natural magical beast (dragon)
Level 15 Solo Soldier      XP 6000
Initiative +13        Senses Perception +15
HP 750; Bloodied 375
AC 33; Fortitude 33, Reflex 30, Will 29
Resist 20 fire
Saving Throws +5
Speed 6, fly 8 (hover), overland flight 12
Action Points 2
 Bite (standard, at-will)  Fire
Reach 2; +22 vs AC; 2d8+7 damage, plus 3d6 fire damage.
 Claw (standard, at-will)
Reach 2; +22 vs AC; 2d8+7 damage.
 Double Attack (standard, at-will)
The dragon makes two claw attacks.
 Tail Strike (immediate reaction, when an enemy moves to a position where it flanks the red dragon, at-will)
the dragon attacks the target; reach 2; targets the triggering enemy; +20 vs Reflex; 2d10+7 damage, and the target is pushed 1 square.
 Breath Weapon (standard, recharge  Fire
Close blast 5; +20 vs Reflex; 2d12+6 fire damage. Miss: Half damage.
 Bloodied Breath (free, when first bloodied, encounter)  Fire
The dragon’s breath weapon recharges, and the dragon uses it immediately.
 Frightful Presence (standard, at-will)  Fear
Close burst 5; targets enemies; +20 vs Will; the target is stunned until the end of the dragon’s next turn. Aftereffect: The target takes a -2 penalty to attack rolls (save ends).
Alignment Evil        Languages Common, Draconic
Skills Bluff +14, Insight +15, Intimidate +19
Str 25 (+14)      Dex 19 (+11)      Wis 16 (+10)
Con 22 (+13)      Int 13 (+8)      Cha 14 (+9)



Young Red Dragon
Large natural magical beast (dragon)
Level 7 Solo SoldierXP 1500
HP 332; Bloodied 166  
Initiative +8  Perception+11
AC 23, Fortitude 21, Reflex 18, Will 18  
Resist 15 fire 
Speed 6, fly 8  Darkvision
Saving Throws +5; Action Points 2
Traits
Action Recovery
Whenever the dragon ends its turn, any dazing, stunning, or dominating effect on it ends.
Instinctive Assault
On an initiative of 10 + its initiative check, the dragon can use a free action to use bite or claw. If the dragon cannot use a free action to make this attack due to a dominating or stunning effect, then that effect ends instead of the dragon making the attack.
Standard Actions
 Bite (fire)  At-Will
Attack: Melee 2 (one creature); +12 vs. AC
Hit: 2d10 + 6 damage. The target is grabbed and takes ongoing 5 fire damage, or ongoing 10 fire damage if the dragon is bloodied, until the grab ends (escape DC 19).
 Claw  At-Will
Attack: Melee 2 (one or two creatures); +12 vs. AC. If the dragon targets only one creature, it can make this attack twice against that creature
Hit: 2d8 + 5 damage, and the dragon grabs the target (escape DC 16) if it has fewer than two creatures grabbed.
 Breath Weapon (fire)  Recharge  
Attack: Close blast 5 (creatures in the blast); +10 vs. Reflex
Hit: 2d12 + 7 fire damage, or 2d12 + 17 fire damage while the dragon is bloodied.
Miss: Half damage.
Triggered Actions
 Tail Strike  At-Will
Trigger: An enemy leaves a square within 2 squares of the dragon.
Attack (Immediate Reaction): Melee 3 (the triggering enemy); +10 vs. Reflex
Hit: 1d6 + 5 damage, and the target falls prone.
 Bloodied Breath  Encounter
Trigger: The dragon is first bloodied.
Effect (Free Action): Breath weapon recharges, and the dragon uses it.
Skills Bluff +10, Insight +11
Str 22 (+9)                Dex 17 (+6)                Wis 16 (+6)
Con 19 (+7)                Int 11 (+3)                Cha 14 (+5)
Alignment evil        Languages Common, Draconic




What do middle earth red dragons do that 4e dragons don't? Sorry I haven't read the hobbit.

Shouldn't be too hard to add whats missing. 

 Actually, I think it's the other way around - Tolkien's dragon is never hinted at being anything more than an intelligent flying, fire-breathing beast. There's never any mention of any sort of magical ability at all. Tolkien doesn't really delve into the ecology of his dragons - in fact, Smaug may be the only one he ever mentions by name, unless there's one in the Silmarillion or in one of the appendices somewhere.

 Aside from being pretty close to unkillable (nobody ever voluntarily fights a dragon, much less actively provokes one), Smaug is described as having an accute sense of smell and hearing, possibly enough to warrant an actual mechanical advantage - possibly tremorsense, and probably has night vision, but he still wasnt able to see Bilbo Baggins when Bilbo was wearing the One Ring (i.e., invisible and stealthed).  
 I only watched the recent movie once, but I don't recall Smaug (the little we've seen of him so far) doing anything that's not bog-standard for a typical firebreathing dragon.

 Although Smaug is described as being more lithe and cat-like than the fairly bulky D&D reds, that boils down to nothing but fluff and personal artistic choice on the part of the illustrators and individual DMs.

Show

I am the Magic Man.

(Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.)

 

I am the Lawnmower Man.

(I AM GOD HERE!)

 

I am the Skull God.

(Koo Koo Ka Choo)

 

There are reasons they call me Mad...

Thank you for the replies and the info provided. 

Plaguescarred, thak you very much for uploading the images and stats. I just so happen to actually have that book on Chromatic Dragons, which is great. 

Janx_14, I don't think Middle-Earth dragons have any unique features from D&D dragons, except maybe that Smaug (SPOILER) had a beam of light from his eye and that people who stare into his eye can fall under the dragon spell and be controled. 

Mad_Jack, you bring up some very good points. Tolkien does not really mention of dragons having any special powers or magical abilities, except the dragon spell with their eyes. Tolkein does I believe mention maybe two other dragons with his work of Middle-Earth; I researched that online somewhere.

I am sure that any D&D dragon had the same keen seneses as Smaug, and I think they can not see invisibility either(?). Correct me if I am wrong.

I am wondering how Smaug will be portrayed in the next film, but I am sure that any Red Dragon that is fully grown can match him and his role. I just think that since he is described as "Red-Golden" in color, large in size, likes to collect hoards, speaks and is intelligent, and enjoys riddles, that could fit with D&D since it matches from what I have read in the Draconomicon about typical dragons and he looks like a Red Dragon. 
"Revenge, you? Ha! I am Smaug! I kill where I wish. I am strong, strong, STRONG!!! My armor is like 10 fold shields, my teeth are like swords, my claws spears! The shock of my tail a thunderbolt! My wings a hurricane! Any my breath, death!"

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Or8G_jDcLNo

Seems like a red dragon would fit him quite easily. And the green dragons have an ability like the hypnotism, so you could just lift that ability and plant it into the red dragon's stats.
"Barrel-rider! Your fee came from the waterside and up the water you came with out a doubt. I don't know your smell, but if you are not one of those men of the Lake, you had their help. They shall see me and remember who is the real King under the Mountain!"

I will have to keep that in mind. Good advice tehsquirrely. 
Smaug is also described in the book as having a very powerful personality which can daunt or dominate most normal mortals.

There ARE actually other dragons, though Smaug may be the only one which survived into the Third Age. Glaurung sacked Nargothrond after Turin built a bridge across the gorge which had protected it. Later Glaurung enchanted Turin's sister, taking away her memory, which caused no end of problems. Glaurung was huge, almost invulnerable, and possessed powerful magic such that just talking to him would put any mortal under his spell. He was probably the Ur-Dragon of Middle Earth, though I don't know of any thorough history of dragons written by JRRT. Presumably dragons were embodiments of Maiar who fell under the sway of Melkor before Arda was made, much like Balrogs, but again this never discussed.
That is not dead which may eternal lie
I am sure that all the D&D dragons, especially the Red species can easily intimidate and dominate most by their personality alone. I think Smaug might have been the only one to enter the Third Age. But he took the castle many decades before the story of The Hobbit, and there may have been other dragons alive at the time. After Smaug took Erebor, the other dragons got killed or died off. Sort of sad that there weren't other dragons to enter The Lord of The Rings trilogy, but then The Hobbit would not be so unique. 

Glaurung was the first dragon, thank you for reminding me of the name. I totally forgot it in my earlier reply. He did not have wings, but I think he was very powerful. What you said sounds about the same as to what I found I believe. I don't know what Tolkein created for this information, but it is found online by the wikia pages I think. Great information AbdulAlhazred.
I am sure that all the D&D dragons, especially the Red species can easily intimidate and dominate most by their personality alone. I think Smaug might have been the only one to enter the Third Age. But he took the castle many decades before the story of The Hobbit, and there may have been other dragons alive at the time. After Smaug took Erebor, the other dragons got killed or died off. Sort of sad that there weren't other dragons to enter The Lord of The Rings trilogy, but then The Hobbit would not be so unique. 

Glaurung was the first dragon, thank you for reminding me of the name. I totally forgot it in my earlier reply. He did not have wings, but I think he was very powerful. What you said sounds about the same as to what I found I believe. I don't know what Tolkein created for this information, but it is found online by the wikia pages I think. Great information AbdulAlhazred.

Yeah, Glaurung (at least one version of the story) appears in The Silmarillion in the story of Turin Turambar. I think you're right, Glaurung was wingless. Turin eventually killed him, but wished he hadn't!

Anyway, yeah, a 4e Elder Red Dragon is going to be what, level 33? It can probably Intimidate or Bluff close to anyone in existence, though obviously PCs of around level 30 would be tough targets. Normal humans would simply melt against a skill bonus of something like +30. So it would be a lot like the description of Smaug. Of course the "killed with one fated arrow shot" part isn't really something that the rules would cover, but if I were setting up that scenario I'd make Smaug a giant SC, he would simply be impossible for the (presumably MUCH lower level) PCs to face in direct combat, but a successful SC could let the rogue sneak in, observe the dragon's weak point, describe it to an animal messenger, convey the information to the archer with the fated arrow, and result in the fated shot felling the Dragon. Its a fun story, though like most literary fantasy scenarios a bit cut-and-dried to easily translate to an RPG.
That is not dead which may eternal lie
I am sure that all the D&D dragons, especially the Red species can easily intimidate and dominate most by their personality alone. I think Smaug might have been the only one to enter the Third Age. But he took the castle many decades before the story of The Hobbit, and there may have been other dragons alive at the time. After Smaug took Erebor, the other dragons got killed or died off. Sort of sad that there weren't other dragons to enter The Lord of The Rings trilogy, but then The Hobbit would not be so unique. 

Glaurung was the first dragon, thank you for reminding me of the name. I totally forgot it in my earlier reply. He did not have wings, but I think he was very powerful. What you said sounds about the same as to what I found I believe. I don't know what Tolkein created for this information, but it is found online by the wikia pages I think. Great information AbdulAlhazred.

There was also Scatha the Worm, a cold-drake, and the mightiest of all dragons (and the first to fly) Ancalagon the Black.  Those (and Smaug) are the only named JRRT dragons that I can think of.  Of course there is dragon Chrysophylax from Farmer Giles of Ham if you count that as part of Middle Earth.

In the Silmarillion Melkor created dragons with "flame and sorcery."  Thus, they were not converted spirits like the balrogs.  Maybe something similar to how he created orcs though.  
I am sure that all the D&D dragons, especially the Red species can easily intimidate and dominate most by their personality alone. I think Smaug might have been the only one to enter the Third Age. But he took the castle many decades before the story of The Hobbit, and there may have been other dragons alive at the time. After Smaug took Erebor, the other dragons got killed or died off. Sort of sad that there weren't other dragons to enter The Lord of The Rings trilogy, but then The Hobbit would not be so unique. 

Glaurung was the first dragon, thank you for reminding me of the name. I totally forgot it in my earlier reply. He did not have wings, but I think he was very powerful. What you said sounds about the same as to what I found I believe. I don't know what Tolkein created for this information, but it is found online by the wikia pages I think. Great information AbdulAlhazred.

TheDragonHunter, I wouldn't use the stats from the first MM or Draconomicon if I were you as they are old.  Look at the Monster Vault dragons for a much improved design.  If you truely wanted to create a smaug I would suggest using the elder red dragon from the MV and maybe advance it's level and size as needed while adding in a gaze power or something similar.
I am sure that all the D&D dragons, especially the Red species can easily intimidate and dominate most by their personality alone. I think Smaug might have been the only one to enter the Third Age. But he took the castle many decades before the story of The Hobbit, and there may have been other dragons alive at the time. After Smaug took Erebor, the other dragons got killed or died off. Sort of sad that there weren't other dragons to enter The Lord of The Rings trilogy, but then The Hobbit would not be so unique. 

Glaurung was the first dragon, thank you for reminding me of the name. I totally forgot it in my earlier reply. He did not have wings, but I think he was very powerful. What you said sounds about the same as to what I found I believe. I don't know what Tolkein created for this information, but it is found online by the wikia pages I think. Great information AbdulAlhazred.

There was also Scatha the Worm, a cold-drake, and the mightiest of all dragons (and the first to fly) Ancalagon the Black.  Those (and Smaug) are the only named JRRT dragons that I can think of.  Of course there is dragon Chrysophylax from Farmer Giles of Ham if you count that as part of Middle Earth.

In the Silmarillion Melkor created dragons with "flame and sorcery."  Thus, they were not converted spirits like the balrogs.  Maybe something similar to how he created orcs though.  

Dragons do seem less tied to the will of Melkor than others of his creations though. One gets the impression in fact that they don't really care a whole lot about Sauron's plans for instance, though Gandalf does at one point mention the demise of Smaug in the context of the climactic War of the Ring. Anyway, yeah, Scatha and Ancalagon, and the mention of "A cold drake" pretty much sums up the lore of dragons in ME.
That is not dead which may eternal lie
In the Silmarillion there was a huge battle in the skies between a host of dragons and the giant eagles lead by Thorondor and Earendil. This occurred when Melkor's fortress Angband was finally stormed at the end of the War of Wrath and he was defeated. Tolkien describes a mighty host of dragons as Melkor's greatest weapon. The dragons are ultimately defeated and only a few escaped. It is never really explained, but it can be assumed that Smaug was one of these escapees or perhaps a descendant of them. 
dave2008, that sounds like good advice. I have honestly read the Draconomicon for information about them, I will certainly consider the Monster Vault and future releases. I think I found a web page on the D&D site that covers a bit about the Red Dragons from the Monster Vault edition. The link is here below.

www.wizards.com/dnd/article.aspx?x=dnd/4...


Also, I do agree that an elder huge Red Dragon would make a good Smaug impression and with advancing its power and size.

AbdulAlhazred, I totally did know about those other montsters. Great information. 

Style75, that sounds interesting with what you said. Smaug may indeed have been an escapee or a descendant for sure.
Tolkien's heroes exist in an E6 world. That's why dragons are so deadly in Middle Earth ;)

I did a 4e conversion of the red dragon wizard Infyrana from 2e's "Dragon Mountain", and used the charming gaze of Smaug and Glaurung as inspiration for some of her powers. I designed her to be a lethal challenge for a large 13th level party using the Draconomicon, wizard spells, and my imagination; I ended up designing her as a three-stage boss monster: three 14th level solos (each a different role) fought one after the other. It made for a VERY long fight, but a tense and exciting one!

Also, in the same campaign, I began the first session with a red dragon attacking the king's castle, and I pulled every nasty dragon trick I could think of: the dragon started a forest fire which drove peasant refugees to the castle, then launched a delayed blast fireball into the back of one of the refugee's wagons, dropping a flaming ball of hay on thatch roofs, deliberately falling on guardsmen, etc. Because of the dragon's maneuverability in the open air, this fight (a 15th level solo brute) was nearly as deadly as the Infyrana fight.

aaronil,

 

Very nice! How is the "Dragon Mountain" adventure? Is it good? I bet a female dragon would make a great opponet.

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