Where to go from the Red box?

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Hey, me and my friends are new to the whole roleplaying scene and upon doing some research I found out that the best game to start with is probably Dungeons and Dragons. So I decided to buy the new Red Box online and have (attempted) to play a couple of times with my friends and we are all enjoying it, but Im starting to wonder what we should be buying next. I have seen that there a couple of different variants of Dungeons and Dragons and am wondering what we as complete newbs should be looking for. I cant tell if we should invest in the original 4th edition books, the essentials line or even go for the newly reprinted AD&D books. Any advice would be greatly appreciated and as a side note, Im also unsure of what exactly me and my friends should buy, what books are neccesary to get and, as money is a problem, what books are needed just to play the game?
I strongly suggest you purchase the Dungeon Master's Kit. It includes a great adventure for 2nd level characters, tokens and an updated rule book.
I almost always tell folks that if they started with the Red Box they should just continue on with the Essentials line of products and only go for the original hardcover books once they feel they want more stuff of they're getting tired of the somewhat limited options that the Essentials line presents.   IOW, keep it simple until you want something more than simple.

The newly reprinted AD&D books are in no way compatible with any 4th Edition/Essentials products.  They are a completely seperate and different game.

If you're DMing you should have the Rules Compendium, DM's Kit, the Heroes Of ... books and one or more Monster Vault products.  The other players should have one or more Heroes Of ... books and a Rules Compendium.  That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

OD&D, 1E and 2E challenged the player. 3E challenged the character, not the player. Now 4E takes it a step further by challenging a GROUP OF PLAYERS to work together as a TEAM. That's why I love 4E.

"Your ability to summon a horde of celestial superbeings at will is making my ... BMX skills look a bit redundant."

"People treat their lack of imagination as if it's the measure of what's silly. Which is silly." - Noon

"Challenge" is overrated.  "Immersion" is usually just a more pretentious way of saying "having fun playing D&D."

"Falling down is how you grow.  Staying down is how you die.  It's not what happens to you, it's what you do after it happens.”

I strongly suggest you purchase the Dungeon Master's Kit. It includes a great adventure for 2nd level characters, tokens and an updated rule book.



this was going to be my answer so I will second this suggestion
The intended progression from the Red Box is first to the Dungeon Master's Kit (not "Guide"), as a couple of others have already pointed out.  Then to the Monster Vault (not "Monster Vault: Threats to the Nentir Vale").  The reason behind this progression is that these three products have a sequence of adventures that are interconnected, where you're supposed to start with the one in the Red Box, then go to the ones in the Dungeon Master's Kit, then the Monster Vault.

For players, they can pick up Heroes of the Fallen Lands +/- its companion, Heroes of the Forgotten Kingdoms.

After that, you might consider investing in the Rules Compendium + a D&D Insider subscription, so that you can access all the rules and then create your own adventures.

Have fun!
You could also pick another good adventure, The Slaying Stone. It's for level 1 characters, but it can be adapted. If you do want to create your own adventures, then the token sheets in Dungeon Master's Kit and the Monster Vaults are a treasure.
The intended progression from the Red Box is first to the Dungeon Master's Kit (not "Guide"), as a couple of others have already pointed out.  Then to the Monster Vault (not "Monster Vault: Threats to the Nentir Vale").  The reason behind this progression is that these three products have a sequence of adventures that are interconnected, where you're supposed to start with the one in the Red Box, then go to the ones in the Dungeon Master's Kit, then the Monster Vault.

For players, they can pick up Heroes of the Fallen Lands +/- its companion, Heroes of the Forgotten Kingdoms.

After that, you might consider investing in the Rules Compendium + a D&D Insider subscription, so that you can access all the rules and then create your own adventures.

Have fun!



This is solid advice.
Well, if you're having a lot of fun, you could also consider getting the core books behind fourth edition Dungeons & Dragons. I lovve the Dungeon Master's Guide and Dungeon Master's Guide II - just for a more solid understanding of the game in its entirety. But along with those come the Player's Handbooks as well. It really depends upon how much you feel you want tot continue with the game, and how much you can afford to invest. I had the good fortune of having the right amounts to spend when I wanted to get a good, solid collection of tomes and adventures, tiles sets and miniatures. You don't need minis, but I like collecting them. H1 - H3 is pretty cool for running through the Heroic Tier - and P1 - P3 is fun for the Paragon Tier, etc.,
But this all comes from a fellow that loves collecting D&D products nearly as much as I love playing the game.