Invisibility

9 posts / 0 new
Last post
Not really a rules Q, but how do you handle invisibility in practice?

There is a mat, there are models, so when a monster goes "invisible" what do you do?

One idea I came up with was keep graph paper, pick the model up, and trace out where it goes, but that seems wasteful.

Any other ideas?

Thanks

 Leave it where it is...
 Invisible creatures don't automatically become Hidden - they need to make a Stealth check to hide first. If the creature hasn't moved from the space it's in, then everybody has a pretty good idea where it is even if they can't see it (thus the -5 to hit it). If it does move, there's still a pretty good chance they'll know where it went.

 When a character or creature becomes invisible, I usually just replace the miniature with either a clear die or other placeholder to represent the invisibility.

Show

I am the Magic Man.

(Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.)

 

I am the Lawnmower Man.

(I AM GOD HERE!)

 

I am the Skull God.

(Koo Koo Ka Choo)

 

There are reasons they call me Mad...

Under the stealth rules (if I understand correctly) if you move into a square occupied by a creature hidden by stealth, the stealth drops.  So I think that if you are using a grid or battlemat, its better if the GM records the position of the stealthed creatures separately.

I recently had an encounter where this became an issue.  To be honest, I was a little disappointed in the behaviour of my players   Still, next time I will move the token to the Hidden Layer (Maptool reference).

And if you haven't already seen it ... This Thread is Your Friend   Sad that I find a forum thread necessary to explain an important area of 4e rules.
Yeah, just leave the mini or marker or whatever on the board, since being Invisible without being Hidden still means everyone knows where you are.  You just need some indicator so that people know you're Invisible, since that has its own baggage.

I got some Invisibility Stand-Ins from GaleForce Nine a while back.  They're cool little transparent standup 2D minis that you can use in place of your normal mini when your character is invisible.  Stuff like that is totally overpriced IMO, but it is kinda neat.

OD&D, 1E and 2E challenged the player. 3E challenged the character, not the player. Now 4E takes it a step further by challenging a GROUP OF PLAYERS to work together as a TEAM. That's why I love 4E.

"Your ability to summon a horde of celestial superbeings at will is making my ... BMX skills look a bit redundant."

"People treat their lack of imagination as if it's the measure of what's silly. Which is silly." - Noon

"Challenge" is overrated.  "Immersion" is usually just a more pretentious way of saying "having fun playing D&D."

"Falling down is how you grow.  Staying down is how you die.  It's not what happens to you, it's what you do after it happens.”

Please let me re-phrase the question.

If there is an effect that causes a player to guess which square the monster is in, how do you, in practice, keep track of the monster's location (as it moves about) so that the players do not know which square he is in?

Just looking for ideas that will be quick to implement yet be accurate & fair as well. So far all I have come up with is a sheet of graph paper, & I am would like to find a better method.

Thanks
how do you handle invisibility

I replace the creature's miniature with a transparent miniature.

let me re-phrase the question.

If a creature becomes 'hidden' from the PC's, I remove it from the battlemat (which the players seem to enjoy/prefer), and mentally track where the creature is. Players should be able to trust you to keep it straight. Taking extra time to write down each location will likely detract from (rather than add to) their enjoyment.

Luckily it doesn't happen too often, since at least a couple of the PC's will likely have high passive perceptions.

So far all I have come up with is a sheet of graph paper, & I am would like to find a better method.

Honestly, this is how I do it, only I don't even use graph paper.  I just make a little graph on whatever paper I'm holding and track it there.  It's not ideal though, and forunately Hidden doesn't come up much in our games.

An idea just occurs to me though, if your grid on the table had alphanumeric coordinates on it, that would make tracking the location of a hidden creature really simple.  If you expect a situation where someone might become hidden you could write the letters and numbers on a wet or dry-erase grid (I use a piece of plexiglass or lexan over my maps or tiles so I can write on any map with dry-erase markers.) 

Alice:  "G8!"

Bob:  "You sunk my Wizard!"

OD&D, 1E and 2E challenged the player. 3E challenged the character, not the player. Now 4E takes it a step further by challenging a GROUP OF PLAYERS to work together as a TEAM. That's why I love 4E.

"Your ability to summon a horde of celestial superbeings at will is making my ... BMX skills look a bit redundant."

"People treat their lack of imagination as if it's the measure of what's silly. Which is silly." - Noon

"Challenge" is overrated.  "Immersion" is usually just a more pretentious way of saying "having fun playing D&D."

"Falling down is how you grow.  Staying down is how you die.  It's not what happens to you, it's what you do after it happens.”

Please let me re-phrase the question.

If there is an effect that causes a player to guess which square the monster is in, how do you, in practice, keep track of the monster's location (as it moves about) so that the players do not know which square he is in?

Just looking for ideas that will be quick to implement yet be accurate & fair as well. So far all I have come up with is a sheet of graph paper, & I am would like to find a better method.

Thanks

I put a marker on the creature to show it is invisible. I have them roll a d6, d8, or d10. I pick a number to represent the creature's space at random, and if they roll it, then their character guessed correctly.

Now, with area attacks, I will usually pick squares that each number represents for the die that they roll, and see if they hit. The squares are usually the square the creature was in when it disappeared, and all the squares that creature's speed away from that original square.

Like some have said on this thread, though. Creatures with invisibility don't last long against at least one member of the party with great perception.
Inivisibility *doesn't prevent people from knowing where you are located*.  Only rolling Stealth to become Hidden does that.

You can still hear Invisible people, unless they go out of their way to ensure you cannot (by rolling Stealth and beating your passive perception).  The distinction is important.
Harrying your Prey, the Easy Way: A Hunter's Handbook - the first of what will hopefully be many CharOp efforts on my part. The Blinker - teleport everywhere. An Eladrin Knight/Eldritch Knight. CB != rules source.